CLOSE
NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Voyager 1's Back Thrusters Just Fired Up for the First Time in 37 Years

NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Imagine trying to start a car that's been sitting in a garage for decades—and the car is 13 billion miles away. That's what NASA attempted to do this week with the Voyager 1 spacecraft—and it worked.

Four of the thrusters on Voyager 1—the only human-made object ever to reach interstellar space—have been dormant since 1980, just three years after it and its twin probe, Voyager 2, were launched into the universe bearing the sights, sounds, and music of Earth on the Golden Record.

For the past 40 years, Voyager 1 has been using "attitude control thrusters" to keep the spacecraft's antenna oriented to Earth so that it can communicate with us, and us with it. The thrusters fire tiny pulses lasting for just milliseconds. For the past three years, they've been degrading, worrying the Voyager team.

Propulsion experts Carl Guernsey and Todd Barber, from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, considered different interventions and how the spacecraft might respond to them. They proposed attempting to start the four "trajectory correction maneuver," or TCM, thrusters located on the back of the spacecraft, hoping they could take over the job of correctly orienting Voyager. In the early days of the mission, these thrusters, identical in size and functionality to the attitude control thrusters, were used to keep the probe's instruments targeted on Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons as the spacecraft flew by them.

They pored over decades-old data and deciphered outdated software code to make sure they could attempt to turn on the TCM thrusters without causing damage to Voyager. Then, on Tuesday, engineers fired them up and tested their ability to orient the spacecraft, using 10-millisecond pulses. They had to wait 19 hours and 35 minutes for the data to make it to Earth, but eventually they got the good news: The TCM thrusters were up to snuff.

Now that the back thrusters are operational, Voyager 1 just got another two to three years of life, Suzanne Dodd, mission project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement. The plan is to shift the orientation work to the TCM thrusters in stages beginning in January. Each requires a heater to operate, and turning on the heaters requires power, which is a strain on the aging probe. So when there's no longer enough power for them, the job will switch back to the attitude control thrusters.

The engineers will likely attempt the same move with Voyager 2 when its attitude control thrusters start to break down; currently, they're in better shape than Voyager 1's. Now in the periphery of our solar system in what's known as the heliosheath, Voyager 2 will enter interstellar space in the next few years. As the twin crafts fly deeper into the universe at more than 36,000 mph, they'll keep talking to Earth for at least a little while longer. 

arrow
Space
The Fascinating Device Astronauts Use to Weigh Themselves in Space

Most every scale on Earth, from the kind bakers use to measure ingredients to those doctors use to weigh patients, depends on gravity to function. Weight, after all, is just the mass of an object times the acceleration of gravity that’s pushing it toward Earth. That means astronauts have to use unconventional tools when recording changes to their bodies in space, as SciShow explains in the video below.

While weight as we know it technically doesn’t exist in zero-gravity conditions, mass does. Living in space can have drastic effects on a person’s body, and measuring mass is one way to keep track of these changes.

In place of a scale, NASA astronauts use something called a Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) to “weigh” themselves. Once they mount the pogo stick-like contraption it moves them a meter using a built-in spring. Heavier passengers take longer to drag, while a SLAMMD with no passenger at all takes the least time to move. Using the amount of time it takes to cover a meter, the machine can calculate the mass of the person riding it.

Measuring weight isn’t the only everyday activity that’s complicated in space. Astronauts have been forced to develop clever ways to brush their teeth, clip their nails, and even sleep without gravity.

[h/t SciShow]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
fun
Watch Astronauts Assemble Pizza in Space
iStock
iStock

Most everyone enjoys a good pizza party: Even astronauts living aboard the International Space Station.

As this video from NASA shows, assembling pizza in zero gravity is not only possible, it also has delicious results. The inspiration for the pizza feast came from Paolo Nespoli, an Italian astronaut who was craving one of his home country’s national dishes while working on the ISS. NASA’s program manager for the space station, Kirk Shireman, sympathized with his colleague and ordered pizzas to be delivered to the station.

NASA took a little longer responding to the request than your typical corner pizzeria might. The pizzas were delivered via the Orbital ATK capsule, and once they arrived, the ingredients had to be assembled by hand. The components didn’t differ too much from regular pizzas on Earth: Flatbread, tomato sauce, and cheese served as the base, and pepperoni, pesto, olives, and anchovy paste made up the toppings. Before heating them up, the astronauts had some fun with their creations, twirling them around like "flying saucers of the edible kind,” according to astronaut Randy Bresnik.

In case the pizza party wasn’t already a success, it also coincided with movie night on the International Space Station.

[h/t KHQ Q6]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios