BauBax
BauBax

Need to Travel Light? This Jacket Doubles as a Suitcase

BauBax
BauBax

Sometimes, carting a suitcase (or two) around on vacation is just too much of a hassle. You have to heave it into overhead compartments and taxi trunks, lug it up stairs, and deal with baggage claim. But if you need to travel extra light, there’s an extreme solution: Enter the jacket that can essentially double as a suitcase, as Travel + Leisure puts it.

BauBax jackets—$110 for a windbreaker on BauBax.com—feature 15 different compartments designed to hold all your stuff, no bag required. It has a built-in neck pillow and a hood already equipped with an eye mask to help you snooze on long flights as well as earphone holders so you never miss out on your travel tunes. It comes with its own slide-down gloves in the sleeves and a pocket for a blanket (sold separately). It has custom pockets for your passport, your sunglasses, your phone, your power bank, and your tablet. It even has a pocket just for your drink, so you never have to say “Hold my beer.” Essentially, if you want to carry it, BauBax has a dedicated place for it.

Close-ups of the 15 different pocket features of the men's BauBax bomber jacket
Screenshot via BauBax

The jackets come in a few different styles for men and women, including a bomber, a hoodie, a windbreaker, and a blazer, all with the same 15 features and compartments. You aren’t going to be able to take five changes of clothes and shoes, but if you’re just headed somewhere for a weekend or want to ditch your carry-on, it could easily cut down on your travel load.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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The Best (and Worst) States for Summer Road Trips
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iStock

As we shared recently, the great American road trip is making a comeback, but some parts of the country are more suitable for hitting the open road than others. If you're interested in taking a road trip this summer but are stuck on figuring out the destination, WalletHub has got you covered: The financial advisory website analyzed factors like road conditions, gas prices, and concentration of activities to give you this map of the best states to explore by car.

Wyoming—home to the iconic road trip destination Yellowstone National Park—ranked No. 1 overall with a total score of 58.75 out of 100. It's followed by North Carolina in the No. 2 slot, Minnesota at No. 3, and Texas at No. 4. Coming in the last four slots are the three smallest states in America—Rhode Island, Delaware, and Connecticut—and Hawaii, a state that's obviously difficult to reach by car.

But you shouldn't only look at the overall score if you're planning a road trip route: Some states that did poorly in one category excelled in others. California for example, came in 12th place overall, and ranked first when it came to activities and 41st in cost. So if you have an unlimited budget and want to fit as many fun stops into your vacation as possible, taking a trip up the West Coast may be the way to go. On the other end of the spectrum, Mississippi is a good place to travel if you're conscious of spending, ranking second in costs, but leaves a lot to be desired in terms of the quality of your trip, coming in 38th place for safety and 44th for activities.

Choosing the stops for your summer road trip is just the first step of the planning process. Once you have that covered, don't forget to pack these essentials.

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Netherlands Officials Want to Pay Residents to Bike to Work
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iStock

Thinking about relocating to the Netherlands? You might also want to bring a bike. Government officials are looking to compensate residents for helping solve their traffic congestion problem and they want businesses to pay residents to bike to work, as The Independent reports.

Owing to automobile logjams on roadways that keep drivers stuck in their cars and cost the economy billions of euros annually, Dutch deputy infrastructure minister Stientje van Veldhoven recently told media that she's endorsing a program that would pay employees 19 cents for every kilometer (0.6 miles) they bike to work.

That doesn't sound like very much, but perhaps citizens who need to trek several miles each way would appreciate the cumulative boost in their weekly paychecks. For employers, the benefit would be a healthier workforce that might take fewer sick days and reduce parking needs.

Veldhoven says she also plans on designing a program that would assist employers in supplying workers with bicycles. The goal is to have 200,000 people opting for manual transportation over cars. If the program proceeds, it might find a receptive population. The Netherlands is already home to 22.5 million bikes, more than the 17.1 million people living there. In Amsterdam, a quarter of residents bike to work.

There's no timeline for implementing the pay-to-bike plan, but early trial studies indicate that the expense might not have to be a long-term prospect. Study subjects continued to bike to work even after the financial rewards stopped.

[h/t The Independent]

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