If You Don't See the Northern Lights on This Cruise, Your Next Trip is Free

iStock
iStock

Even if you wait for the best time of year and scope out the perfect spot, seeing the Northern Lights in person is never a guarantee. The visibility of the aurora borealis on any given night depends on multiple factors that are tough to predict. But one cruise line is confident they can take you to the light show—so confident that they’re promising a second trip on them if you miss the Lights the first time, Travel + Leisure reports.

The Astronomy Voyage from Hurtigruten Cruises leaves Norway between October and March, traveling from Bergen to the Arctic town of Kirkenes and back. During the 12-day tour, passengers are treated to views of Norwegian landscapes and wildlife and, if all goes according to plan, the Northern Lights in all their glory. In its first 10 years, the voyage has never gone all 12 days without at least one clear look at the aurora borealis, but if year 11 marks a break in that pattern, customers have no reason to worry. Hurtigruten promises to send them on a free six- or seven-day cruise next year to give them another shot at the experience.

“We know that no trip to the Arctic Circle is quite complete without experiencing this highlight (pun intended!) at least once on your journey,” the website reads, “so your Hurtigruten experience will be one with zero regrets.”

When passengers aren’t sky-gazing on the deck, they can sit in on presentations from the ship's own onboard astronomer or visit the Tromsø Planetarium (the northernmost planetarium in the world) during one of the ship’s many stops. Admission to the planetarium is included in the roughly $1,970 ticket price, along with meals and access to an English-speaking tour guide. The aurora borealis guarantee is also included in the fare, but considering that the current season is projected to be one of the best for viewing the Northern Lights until 2025, it’s likely that no one will need to redeem it.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

The Isle of Sark Needs a New Dairy Farmer, But You'll Have to Bring Your Own Cows

Philipp Guelland/Getty Images
Philipp Guelland/Getty Images

If you've ever dreamed of moving to a secluded island to become a farmer, the Isle of Sark is giving you the opportunity. Sark, located in England's Channel Islands, is seeking a dairy farmer to supply milk to the island's population of 500. The only catch is that job candidates must be ready to move there with their own herd of 25 to 35 cows, Atlas Obscura reports.

Sark is a 3-mile long, mile-and-a-half wide island with green pastures, rocky cliffs, and no cars or street lamps. The only way to get there is by boat or one of the ferries that leaves from the nearby Jersey and Guernsey islands.

The last time the island had a dairy farmer was 2017. That year, farmer Christopher Nightingale shut down his business due to issues with costs and land instability. The Isle of Sark held onto feudalism long after the rest of Europe abandoned it, and though the practice technically ended in 2008, it hasn't died completely. Sometimes this works to the community's advantage, like when Nazis invaded in 1940, but it also means that farmers must lease their land for short periods rather than own it.

If you're willing to trade your right to own property for idyllic island living, Sark's dairy farmer gig maybe the perfect fit for you. The island is looking for someone, or a couple, with lots of dairy farming experience, and a herd of Jersey or Guernsey cows, which are native to the Channel Islands. You can reach out to Caragh Couldridge at info@caraghchocolates.com for information on how to apply.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

Finland's New Tourism Campaign Wants to Show You Why It's the Happiest Country in the World

Visit Finland
Visit Finland

Finland has been named the happiest country on Earth for the second year in a row, according to the United Nations World Happiness Report for 2019. Recent government and health care reform issues notwithstanding, the Nordic nation has a lot to be pleased about, including a high GDP, strong school system, and long life spans.

Finns are eager to share the keys to their contentedness with the rest of the world. That’s why the country’s travel promotion organization, Visit Finland, is hosting a contest to bring international guests to Finland for a three-day tour this summer.

Dubbed “Rent a Finn,” the initiative will set guests up with a local host family in Helsinki, Lapland, Lakeland, or another part of the country. One guest will stay with Linda and Niko, a couple who live with their chihuahua, Helmi, on a Finnish island in the Baltic Sea. Another will stay with Esko, the mayor of Rovaniemi, which bills itself as “the hometown of Santa Claus.”

These “Happiness Guides” will help visitors connect to nature—one of the ways that Finns relieve stress. To apply, just film a short video introducing yourself and explaining your connection to nature and why you want to visit Finland. You can apply as an individual or as a group with friends or family. Then fill out an online application, upload your video, and submit it before the April 21 deadline.

Eight applicants (plus their friends and family) will be selected for the trip, with the cost of travel and accommodation covered. Guests who want to extend their stay are welcome to do so, but it would be at their own expense.

According to Visit Finland, there have been four times as many applicants from the U.S. than any other country. This isn’t entirely surprising, considering that the U.S. ranked 19th in the World Happiness Report—down five spots from 2017.

You don’t necessarily have to travel to Finland to improve your outlook on life, though. Here are 23 science-backed ways to feel happier without boarding a plane.

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