Finally! Converse Introduces Weatherproof Chuck Taylors

Converse
Converse

One thing devoted fans of Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star sneakers appreciate is consistency. Aside from a slight redesign for 2015’s Chuck II model, the shoes have remained largely unchanged since their debut in 1917. And while purists may not want even the tiniest tweak, this one will prevent a lot of soggy feet.

The company has announced a partnership with waterproofing fabric GORE-TEX and Italian design firm Slam Jam to create a line of water-resistant apparel and footwear, including Chucks reinforced with GORE-TEX sheathing to prevent slush from creeping into the seams. Dubbed “Hikers,” they retail for $150 and will be available in classic black or olive green beginning December 5.

A model sports a pair of Converse Hikers in black
Converse

The shoes are part of the Converse Urban Utility line, which also features designs from artist Cali Thornhill Dewitt and includes a Utility Jacket and the Converse Jump Boot, which the company says is a homage to paratrooper-style military footwear.

While Chuck Taylor fans might be worried about messing with a good thing, the Hikers are actually pretty faithful to the company’s origins. When Converse opened in 1908, they made winterized rubber boots.

[h/t Mashable]

America's Divorce Rate is Declining—and We Have Millennials to Thank for It

iStock/Jason_Lee_Hughes
iStock/Jason_Lee_Hughes

Millennials are reportedly killing off yet another cultural mainstay, but this time, it may be a good thing. According to Bloomberg, divorce rates are going down, thanks to the commitment powers of younger generations.

Between 2008 and 2016, the divorce rate in the U.S. dropped by 18 percent, according to a new analysis of data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Controlling for related factors like age (older people are less likely to get divorced than younger couples), the rate still dropped by 8 percent. By contrast, Baby Boomers have consistently divorced at higher rates than previous generations.

Many declines that Millennials are blamed for—like rates of homeownership or having kids—can actually be attributed to the dismal finances of a generation that came of age in a recession, is saddled with crushing student debt, and faces high costs of living and low wage growth. Divorces can be expensive, too. Yet several trends point to a higher likelihood of marriage stability for the Millennial generation that has nothing to do with finances. On average, Millennials are marrying later in life, and spending more time dating partners prior to marriage than earlier generations, both of which correlate with a lower chance of divorce, according to social scientists.

“The U.S. is progressing toward a system in which marriage is rarer, and more stable, than it was in the past,” author Philip Cohen writes in the paper.

Sorry, law school students, but it looks like being a divorce lawyer is going to get a little less lucrative in the future.

[h/t Bloomberg]

Tune in Tonight: Mental Floss on Jeopardy!

All that time you've spent on here is about to pay off.

Tune in tonight for Jeopardy! and you'll catch the debut of the "I Learned It From Mental Floss" category. Big bucket list moment for us.

We've been working closely with the Jeopardy! team over on Instagram, sharing amazing facts on both @jeopardy and @mental_floss. Study up!

Check your local listings for stations and show times.

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