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A Slice Above the Rest? Pizza Could Earn UNESCO World Heritage Status

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People all around the world love pizza. But the dish has special significance for Italians: It's widely believed that a 19th-century Naples man named Raffaele Esposito invented the modern iteration of the sliced pie. To celebrate this culinary legacy, Food & Wine reports that more than two million Italians have petitioned for pizza to be given UNESCO World Heritage status.

Launched in 2006, UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity list recognizes traditional practices and activities around the world—including music, food, and dance—that shape national identity. Delicious additions have included Turkish coffee, Croatian gingerbread, Japanese washoku, the Mediterranean diet, and the cuisines of Mexico and France. Not just any food can be added to the list, however: UNESCO honors (and aims to preserve) only traditional cooking methods that were pioneered by a single nation.

Pizza makers in Naples argue that their wares fit the bill, as Neapolitan pizza was born in their home city. As The Telegraph reports, they also hope that a special UNESCO designation will protect pizza from "food piracy and appropriation." This offense includes using non-Italian ingredients and unorthodox toppings and sauces. (Pineapple, anyone?)

UNESCO's committee on cultural heritage meets in Seoul, South Korea, in early December. There, they will decide whether Neapolitan pizza deserves a spot on the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity list—and maybe even enjoy a slice or two themselves.

[h/t Food & Wine]

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
Meet Japan's Original (Not-so-Fresh) Form of Sushi, 'Funazushi'
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)

When it comes to sushi, fresh is usually best. Most of the sushi we eat in America is haya-nare, which involves raw seafood and vinegared rice. But in Japan, there's an older form of sushi—said to be the original form—called funazushi. It's made from fermented carp sourced from one particular place, Lake Biwa, and takes about three years to produce from start to finish. The salt it's cured with keeps the bad bacteria at bay, and the result is said to taste like a fish version of prosciutto. Great Big Story recently caught up with Mariko Kitamura, the 18th generation to run her family’s shop in Takashima City, where she's one of the very few people left producing funazushi. You can learn more about the process behind the delicacy, and about Kitamura, in the video below.

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