20 Years Later, James Cameron Is Using Physics to Defend Jack's Death in Titanic

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

Sorry, Titanic fans—Jack Dawson was apparently doomed from the get-go, director James Cameron confirmed in a recent Vanity Fair interview. Twenty years after Titanic’s release, fans of the 1997 film still wonder what could have been for Jack and Rose if fate—and physics—had dealt them a different hand (or a different door). And while Cameron is a stickler for accuracy, some question his science savvy, claiming that the floating board could have supported both of them as they awaited rescue.

Cameron conceded that Jack's death was “an artistic choice,” as the movie “is about death and separation.” But he still defended the means, saying he tested the floating board prop itself to gauge its buoyancy.

“I was in the water with the piece of wood putting people on it for about two days getting it exactly buoyant enough so that it would support one person with full free-board, meaning that she wasn't immersed at all in the 28 degree water so that she could survive the three hours it took until the rescue ship got there,” Cameron said. (A lifeboat ultimately picked up Rose about an hour later.)

The director believed then—and still does—“that that’s what it would have taken for one person to survive.” That said, his personal conviction (and artistic license) didn't stop the Mythbusters from challenging Cameron’s assertion in 2012.

Hosts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman first conducted a mock test using dolls and a tiny recreation of the film’s door. Sure enough, the board tipped—but when the duo themselves attempted the feat with a full-scale replica, they figured out that Rose could have taken off her life jacket and placed it underneath the board to add extra buoyancy. This trick raised the board so that around 80 percent of their bodies were out of the water while floating.

“With all we’ve learned, I think Jack’s death was needless,” Hyneman concluded. (Cameron, in turn, countered that the Mythbusters were “missing the point.”)

So, yes—with a little bit of ingenuity, Jack might have lived long enough to take Rose on the roller coaster at Santa Monica Pier. But even though Cameron isn't an artistic revisionist, fans can still appreciate the director’s overall commitment to scientific detail.

In 2012, when Titanic was re-released in 3D for its 15th anniversary, Cameron tweaked the night sky Rose stares at while floating in the Atlantic.

“Neil deGrasse Tyson sent me quite a snarky email saying that, at that time of year, in that position in the Atlantic in 1912, when Rose is lying on the piece of driftwood and staring up at the stars, that is not the star field she would have seen," Cameron said, according to The Telegraph. “And with my reputation as a perfectionist, I should have known that and I should have put the right star field in."

We're just sorry he didn't put in a different door.

[h/t Vanity Fair]

How Much Is Game of Thrones Author George RR Martin Worth?

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

by Dana Samuel

Unsurprisingly, Game of Thrones took home another Emmy Award earlier this week for Outstanding Drama Series, which marked the series' third time winning the title. Of course, George RR Martin—the author who wrote the books that inspired the TV show, and the series' executive producer—celebrated the victory alongside ​the GoT cast.

For anyone who may be unfamiliar with Martin's work, he is the author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the epic fantasy series that lead to the Game of Thrones adaptation. Basically, we really we have him to thank for this seven-year roller coaster we've been on.

At 70 years old (his birthday was yesterday, September 20th), Martin has had a fairly lengthy career as an author, consisting of a number of screenplays and TV pilots before A Song of Ice and Fire, which, ​according to Daily Mail he wrote in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings.

 Cast and crew of Outstanding Drama Series winner 'Game of Thrones' pose in the press room during the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

Martin sold the rights to his A Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007, and he truly owes the vast majority of his net worth to the success of his novels and the Game of Thrones TV series. So how much exactly is this acclaimed author worth? According to Daily Mail, Martin makes about $15 million annually from the TV show, and another $10 million from his successful literary works.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, that makes Martin's net worth about $65 million.

Regardless of his millions, Martin still lives a fairly modest life, and it's clear he does everything for his love of writing.

We'd like to extend a personal thank you to Martin for creating one of the most exciting and emotionally jarring storylines we've ever experienced.
We wish Game of Thrones could go ​on for 13 seasons, too!

The '90s PBS Shows We're Still Talking About Online, Mapped

Were you a Barney kid or an Arthur kid? Or maybe you were obsessed with the Teletubbies instead? Or maybe you're still that kid inside, off making PBS memes as an adult. You're never too old to appreciate public television's kids programming, if the recent box office success of the Mister Rogers documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor? is any indication.

Knowing that today's adults still have a soft spot in their hearts for the PBS shows of their childhoods, the telecom sales agent CenturyLinkQuote.com used Google Trends to figure out what kind of impact different kids' series had on each state. They created the map above, showing the most talked-about PBS Kids show in every state over the last 14 years.

According to this data, the Midwest is all about Reading Rainbow, Sesame Street is big in New Jersey and Delaware, and Wishbone reigns in the Southwest. Mister Rogers, despite his status as a TV icon, only dominates in Pennsylvania. The short-lived Canadian-American show Zoboomafoo makes a surprisingly strong showing, coming in as the favorite in four different states despite only having two seasons.

Did your favorite make the list?

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