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Color Me Katie

10 of the Most Fun Photo Projects on the Web

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Color Me Katie

A picture's worth 1000 words, but these online photo projects might leave you speechless.

1. The Love Train


Courtesy of James Doernberg 

College students James Doernberg and Kai Jordan have only been dating a month, but that didn't stop them from going the distance and photographing themselves at every Manhattan subway station last Wednesday. The couple started at 14th Street on the 1 line and made their way up, down, and crosstown, snapping a quick picture and scrambling back through the closing doors at each stop. The 118-station photo shoot took nine hours to complete. Doernberg and Jordan are moving away from the city—and each other—when they attend separate colleges in the fall.

2. Mila's Daydreams

Courtesy of Mila's Daydreams 

If you've seen one sleeping baby picture, you've seen them all ... unless you're looking at the blog Mila's Daydreams. Finnish mom Adele Enersen created a whole new genre of infant photography when she began creating imaginative dreamscapes around her sleeping daughter in 2010. The successful blog has launched an art book entitled When My Baby Dreams, a popular wall calendar, and many adorable imitators.

3. Switcheroo


Courtesy of Hana Pesut 

Canadian photographer Hana Pesut's Switcheroo photo series first captures couples in their normal clothes and then makes them swap outfits. Hey, it's more fun than walking a mile in each other's shoes ...

4. Brooklyn Theory

Courtesy of Brooklyn Theory 

Photographers see the world differently from the rest of us. Exhibit A: The blog of Brooklyn photographer Matt Coch. He won't even go to the laundromat without his camera.

5. Maddie On Things

Courtesy of Maddie On Things 

Maddie the coonhound isn't just her owner's best friend. She's also his muse. Photojournalist Theron Murphy started taking pictures of his graceful rescue dog atop ladders, bikes, and even a basketball hoop as a hobby. Now the two are on a national tour to promote the book Maddie on Things: A Super Serious Project About Dogs and Physics.

6. The Shadow Project

Courtesy of Color Me Katie

Watch your back! In The Shadow Project, Brooklyn photographer Katie Sokoler matched unsuspecting pedestrians with whimsical construction paper shadows. Sokoler hid out with her camera to capture the moment that subjects walked into art. She previously employed the same technique to make Thought Bubbles.

7. Dear Photograph

Courtesy of Dear Photograph 

"Take a picture of a picture, from the past, in the present." The premise of the website Dear Photograph isn't as confusing as it sounds. Contributors return to the place where they took an old photograph, picture in hand, and then take a new photo. The result is a poignant reminder to "take a picture, it'll last longer." Site founder Taylor Jones published a Dear Photograph book in 2012.

8. Noah K. Everyday

Courtesy of Noah K. Everyday 

A selfie a day won't keep the wrinkles away. But if you do it as long as photographer Noah Kalina—13 years and counting—you might actually appreciate growing older. (Watch him age 12.5 years in under eight minutes.)

Feeling camera-shy? Try documenting every day of someone else's life.

9. Humans of New York

Courtesy of Humans of New York

Who says New Yorkers are stand-offish? Photographer Brandon Stanton captures the people of the Big Apple with revealing portraits usually accompanied by a quote. Since launching HONY in 2010, Stanton has also photographed people in Iran and Boston. The Humans of New York book hits stores in October.

10. Young Me/Now Me, Back to the Future, and more

      

Courtesy of Less Human; More Being

If you thought your childhood photos were funny the first time around, try recreating them as an adult. Young Me/Now Me is one of many sites in which contributors submit new-old photos. We're not sure who started the trend, but Argentinian photographer Irina Werning's Back to the Future project does an especially great job replicating the look and feel of vintage photos.

Courtesy of Back to the Future 
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What else deserves to be on this list?

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Courtesy Sotheby's
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You Can Buy the Oldest Surviving Photo of a U.S. President
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Courtesy Sotheby's

The descendent of a 19th-century U.S. Congressman has discovered a previously unknown presidential portrait that is likely the oldest surviving photograph of a U.S. president, The New York Times reports.

Previously, two 1843 portraits of John Quincy Adams were thought to be the oldest photographs of a president still around. Currently hanging in the National Portrait Gallery, one of them was found on sale at an antique shop in 1970 for a mere 50 cents. Now, an even older photo of the sixth president has been uncovered, and it’ll cost you more than 50 cents to buy it.

Adams sat for dozens of photographs throughout his life, so it’s not entirely surprising that a few more surviving portraits would be uncovered. At the time this newly discovered half-plate daguerreotype was taken in March 1843, Adams had already served out his term as president and had returned to Congress as a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. The photo was taken by Philip Haas, who in August of that same year would take other daguerreotypes that we previously thought were the oldest surviving photos. (Despite his apparent willingness to be photographed, Adams called them “all hideous.”)

John Quincy Adams sits in a portrait studio in 1843.
Courtesy Sotheby's

After having three daguerreotypes taken that day in March, Adams gave one of them to his friend and fellow Congressman Horace Everett, inscribing it with both their names. Everett’s great-great-grandson eventually found it in his family’s belongings and is now putting it up for sale through Sotheby’s.

It isn't the oldest picture of a U.S. president ever taken, though. The first-ever was actually a portrait of William Henry Harrison made in 1841, but unlike this one, the original has not survived. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art owns a copy of it, which was made in 1850.)

The head of the Sotheby’s department for photographs, Emily Bierman, told The New York Times that the newly discovered image is “without a doubt the most important historical photo portrait to be offered at auction in the last 20 years.” (She also noted that the former POTUS is wearing “cute socks” in it.)

The daguerreotype will be on sale as part of a photography auction at Sotheby’s in October and is expected to sell for an estimated $150,000 to $250,000. Start saving.

[h/t The New York Times]

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Dive into the world of Shark, a new book by award-winning photographer Brian Skerry.

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