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Color Me Katie

10 of the Most Fun Photo Projects on the Web

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Color Me Katie

A picture's worth 1000 words, but these online photo projects might leave you speechless.

1. The Love Train

Courtesy of James Doernberg 

College students James Doernberg and Kai Jordan have only been dating a month, but that didn't stop them from going the distance and photographing themselves at every Manhattan subway station last Wednesday. The couple started at 14th Street on the 1 line and made their way up, down, and crosstown, snapping a quick picture and scrambling back through the closing doors at each stop. The 118-station photo shoot took nine hours to complete. Doernberg and Jordan are moving away from the city—and each other—when they attend separate colleges in the fall.

2. Mila's Daydreams

Courtesy of Mila's Daydreams 

If you've seen one sleeping baby picture, you've seen them all ... unless you're looking at the blog Mila's Daydreams. Finnish mom Adele Enersen created a whole new genre of infant photography when she began creating imaginative dreamscapes around her sleeping daughter in 2010. The successful blog has launched an art book entitled When My Baby Dreams, a popular wall calendar, and many adorable imitators.

3. Switcheroo

Courtesy of Hana Pesut 

Canadian photographer Hana Pesut's Switcheroo photo series first captures couples in their normal clothes and then makes them swap outfits. Hey, it's more fun than walking a mile in each other's shoes ...

4. Brooklyn Theory

Courtesy of Brooklyn Theory 

Photographers see the world differently from the rest of us. Exhibit A: The blog of Brooklyn photographer Matt Coch. He won't even go to the laundromat without his camera.

5. Maddie On Things

Courtesy of Maddie On Things 

Maddie the coonhound isn't just her owner's best friend. She's also his muse. Photojournalist Theron Murphy started taking pictures of his graceful rescue dog atop ladders, bikes, and even a basketball hoop as a hobby. Now the two are on a national tour to promote the book Maddie on Things: A Super Serious Project About Dogs and Physics.

6. The Shadow Project

Courtesy of Color Me Katie

Watch your back! In The Shadow Project, Brooklyn photographer Katie Sokoler matched unsuspecting pedestrians with whimsical construction paper shadows. Sokoler hid out with her camera to capture the moment that subjects walked into art. She previously employed the same technique to make Thought Bubbles.

7. Dear Photograph

Courtesy of Dear Photograph 

"Take a picture of a picture, from the past, in the present." The premise of the website Dear Photograph isn't as confusing as it sounds. Contributors return to the place where they took an old photograph, picture in hand, and then take a new photo. The result is a poignant reminder to "take a picture, it'll last longer." Site founder Taylor Jones published a Dear Photograph book in 2012.

8. Noah K. Everyday

Courtesy of Noah K. Everyday 

A selfie a day won't keep the wrinkles away. But if you do it as long as photographer Noah Kalina—13 years and counting—you might actually appreciate growing older. (Watch him age 12.5 years in under eight minutes.)

Feeling camera-shy? Try documenting every day of someone else's life.

9. Humans of New York

Courtesy of Humans of New York

Who says New Yorkers are stand-offish? Photographer Brandon Stanton captures the people of the Big Apple with revealing portraits usually accompanied by a quote. Since launching HONY in 2010, Stanton has also photographed people in Iran and Boston. The Humans of New York book hits stores in October.

10. Young Me/Now Me, Back to the Future, and more

      

Courtesy of Less Human; More Being

If you thought your childhood photos were funny the first time around, try recreating them as an adult. Young Me/Now Me is one of many sites in which contributors submit new-old photos. We're not sure who started the trend, but Argentinian photographer Irina Werning's Back to the Future project does an especially great job replicating the look and feel of vintage photos.

Courtesy of Back to the Future 
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pretty pictures
Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

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Adobe
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With Help From Photoshop and AI, No One Will Know You Blinked in That Photo
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Adobe

After 15 minutes of posing for group photo after group photo, it looks like you’ve finally snapped the perfect one. Grandma is smiling, your nephew is sitting still, and even the dog is looking at the camera for once. Then, you find yourself in the corner: The shutter managed to capture the exact moment you blinked. Time to resume the positions.

With a new tool from Adobe, this scenario could become less common. Instead of retaking a picture every time someone closes their eyes, this feature would let you salvage the “ruined” photograph with a few clicks in Photoshop, Gizmodo reports.

The latest update of Photoshop Elements allows users to select the “Open Closed Eyes” option, choose which face in the photo they want to correct, and provide several additional photos of the subject with their eyes open. The software uses artificial intelligence to analyze each picture and determine which pair of peepers best matches the colors and lighting from the primary photograph. It then automatically pastes those eyes over the lids and blends them to make the addition look seamless.

Photoshop Elements (a simplified version of Adobe’s original image editor) offers many features that use AI algorithms to improve picture quality. Elements can automatically generate backgrounds when you move objects in a photo, suggest the best effects, and turn frowns into smiles. It even remembers the look you prefer and suggests personalized tone corrections. All of those capabilities and the new “Open Closed Eyes” tool are available today to customers who purchase Photoshop Elements 2018 for $100 (or upgrade their existing license for $80).

[h/t Gizmodo]

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