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10 Fun Uses for Old Card Catalogs

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Sonja Flemming/CBS © CBS Broadcasting, Inc.

The library catalog has gone digital, but that doesn’t mean all the old oaken card catalog cabinets have been flung on the ash heap of history. Fans of the TV series The Big Bang Theory have blogged that they covet Sheldon’s geek chic catalog (above). Here are some of the novel ways creative people (including many librarians) have renewed card catalogs.

1. Sewing supplies smartly sorted

Tricia Royal from Chicago, Ill., who blogs about textile arts at www.bitsandbobbins.com, set up this system.

2. Wine warehouse where we would never suspect

The Los Angeles Public Library removed most of the catalog cabinets from the Central Library rotunda, leaving the drawers that were built into the walls and replacing the labels with plaques honoring donors. The Doheny Library at the University of Southern California went a step further. The catalog drawers now have locks so donors can leave gifts for their families. Wine bottles fit neatly, it seems.

Shannon Klug of the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities made the same discovery; that's her catalog above.

For some reason, she wanted us to know that the Dewey number for wine is 641.22.

3. Postcards perched at peculiar angles

Fierce Bunny provided this view.

 

4. Secret stash of spare shoes

Someone with the Twitter handle @amycsc in library Special Collections at the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va., says, “I used some of the drawers in that card catalog to hold my emergency back-up shoes at the office.”

5.  Dragons dreaming in a drawer

Librarian Jill E. Erickson of Falmouth, Mass., notes that the Dewey number should be 635 for gardening.

6. Crimson casters carry a coffee table

Molly Dolan of Morgantown, W. Va., crafted this clever contraption.

7. A sorting system for salty snacks

Liz Fabry of Durham, N.C., captured this view of the craft brewery Fullsteam.

8. Cameras carefully catalogued

Andrea Wiggins, a post-doctoral fellow at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, N.Y., notes, “Someone carved ‘Led Zeppelin’ into one of the pull-out shelves, but there's no match for that vintage institutional yellow wood stain for refinishing, so it just adds more character.”

9. Drawers drafted to document Darwin’s deeds

Photo courtesy the Minneapolis College of Art and Design Library

In Spring 2012, Jen Caruso’s students at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design used an old card catalog to create a “cabinet of curiosities” relating to Charles Darwin's voyage on HMS Beagle. The inspiration was the "Crystal Palace" exhibition of 1851 in London.  (The citrus fruit refers to its use in preventing scurvy during long sea voyages, which bananas do not.)

10. Cat-alog

Photo courtesy of Bart Everson

Well, that's adorable.

Card catalog cabinets have also been used as convenient sort-and-store devices for scarves, jewelry, flatware, tools and hardware, art supplies — and just about anything else that fits within a space 3 ¼” x 5 ¼” x 15".

So what’s in Sheldon’s catalog on The Big Bang Theory? Bill Prady, the show’s co-creator and executive producer, told us the contents have never been revealed, but according to a 2009 article, some drawers are labeled “Luke,” “Vader” and “Solo.”

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Animals
Fisherman Catches Rare Blue Lobster, Donates It to Science
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FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images

Live lobsters caught off the New England coast are typically brown, olive-green, or gray—which is why one New Hampshire fisherman was stunned when he snagged a blue one in mid-July.

As The Independent reports, Greg Ward, from Rye, New Hampshire, discovered the unusual lobster while examining his catch near the New Hampshire-Maine border. Ward initially thought the pale crustacean was an albino lobster, which some experts estimate to be a one-in-100-million discovery. However, a closer inspection revealed that the lobster's hard shell was blue and cream.

"This one was not all the way white and not all the way blue," Ward told The Portsmouth Herald. "I've never seen anything like it."

While not as rare as an albino lobster, blue lobsters are still a famously elusive catch: It's said that the odds of their occurrence are an estimated one in two million, although nobody knows the exact numbers.

Instead of eating the blue lobster, Ward decided to donate it to the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. There, it will be studied and displayed in a lobster tank with other unusually colored critters, including a second blue lobster, a bright orange lobster, and a calico-spotted lobster.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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Animals
Australian Scientists Discover First New Species of Sunfish in 125 Years
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Courtesy Murdoch University

Scientists have pinpointed a whole new species of the largest bony fish in the world, the massive sunfish, as we learned from Smithsonian magazine. It's the first new species of sunfish proposed in more than 125 years.

As the researchers report in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, the genetic differences between the newly named hoodwinker sunfish (Mola tecta) and its other sunfish brethren was confirmed by data on 27 different samples of the species collected over the course of three years. Since sunfish are so massive—the biggest can weigh as much as 5000 pounds—they pose a challenge to preserve and store, even for museums with large research collections. Lead author Marianne Nyegaard of Murdoch University in Australia traveled thousands of miles to find and collected genetic data on sunfish stranded on beaches. At one point, she was asked if she would be bringing her own crane to collect one.

Nyegaard also went back through scientific literature dating back to the 1500s, sorting through descriptions of sea monsters and mermen to see if any of the documentation sounded like observations of the hoodwinker. "We retraced the steps of early naturalists and taxonomists to understand how such a large fish could have evaded discovery all this time," she said in a press statement. "Overall, we felt science had been repeatedly tricked by this cheeky species, which is why we named it the 'hoodwinker.'"

Japanese researchers first detected genetic differences between previously known sunfish and a new, unknown species 10 years ago, and this confirms the existence of a whole different type from species like the Mola mola or Mola ramsayi.

Mola tecta looks a little different from other sunfish, with a more slender body. As it grows, it doesn't develop the protruding snout or bumps that other sunfish exhibit. Similarly to the others, though, it can reach a length of 8 feet or more. 

Based on the stomach contents of some of the specimens studied, the hoodwinker likely feeds on salps, a jellyfish-like creature that it probably chomps on (yes, sunfish have teeth) during deep dives. The species has been found near New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and southern Chile.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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