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When This Box Is Empty, It Can Be Made Into Games and Toys for Displaced Children

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A box designed by Lisanne Koning might contain food, water, toiletries, or other goods to be used by people displaced from their homes. But its purpose doesn't end with delivering supplies. As Co.Design reports, the innovative product, called Inside the Box, is made from brightly painted cardboard that can be made into board games and toys for children.

Koning made the box as part of her thesis at Design Academy Eindhoven and recently exhibited it at Dutch Design Week in the Netherlands. The project aims to help young disaster survivors and refugees living in shelters where playtime isn't a priority. "Every child deserves the chance to play untroubled no matter what the circumstances are," she writes on her website. "Playing helps them to cope."

Shapes can be cut out from the boxes with scissors and assembled into colorful forms of entertainment. One example Koning made features two-dimensional illustrations that can be folded into three-dimensional trucks. Another consists of all the components of a board game, including a board, stand-up pieces, and six-sided dice.

Inside the Box hasn't replaced plain boxes at disaster zones and refugee camps yet, but Koning has tested the concept with a group of Syrian refugees in her area. If it makes its way to shelters around the world, it would be the latest smart product offering multi-purposed functionality in a place where resources are scarce.

[h/t Co.Design]

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Revisit Your Favorite '90s Screensaver With This Free Game
Cahoots Malone
Cahoots Malone

In the '90s, a significant amount of computing power was devoted to generating endless brick mazes on Windows 95. The screensaver has since become iconic, and now nostalgic Microsoft fans can relive it in a whole new way. As Motherboard reports, the animation has been re-imagined into a video game called Screensaver Subterfuge.

Instead of watching passively as your computer weaves through the maze, you’re leading the journey this time around. You play as a kid hacker who’s been charged with retrieving sensitive data hidden in the screensaver of Windows 95 before devious infomancers can get to it first. The gameplay is pretty simple: Use the arrow keys to navigate the halls and press Q and click the mouse to change their design. Finding a giant smiley face takes you to level two, and finding the briefcase icon ends the game. There are also lots of giant rats in this version of the screensaver.

Screensaver Subterfuge was designed by Cahoots Malone as part of the PROCJAM 2017 generative software showcase. You can download it for free for Windows, macOS, and Linux from his website, or if playing a game sounds like too much work, you can always watch videos of the old screensaver on a loop.

[h/t Motherboard]

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Pop Culture
The Princess Ride: Here's What a Princess Bride Theme Park Attraction Might Look Like
MGM
MGM

Do you fight the urge to say “Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya” when introducing yourself? Have you spent the past 30 years mispronouncing the word “marriage”? If so, you may be a diehard fan of The Princess Bride. The cult film (and the book on which it’s based) has inspired board games, merchandise, and countless pop culture references. Now, two theme park designers from Universal have conceived the inconceivable. As Nerdist reports, Jon Plsek and Olivia West have designed the plans for a hypothetical attraction called “The Princess Ride.

Their idea follows the classic river boat ride structure and adds highlights from the movie around each corner. After watching Buttercup and Wesley’s love story unfold, riders are taken past the Cliffs of Insanity, through the Fire Swamp, and into the Pit of Despair. The climax unfolds at Prince Humperdinck’s castle and leads up to the two protagonists riding off into the sunset. The last thing the passengers see is Miracle Max and Valerie waving goodbye saying, “Hope ya had fun stormin’ the castle!”

The ride’s designers make a living turning stories into thrilling attractions. Plsek works as a concept artist for Universal Creative, the group behind Universal’s theme parks, and West works there as a concept writer. While The Princess Ride was just a fun side project for the pair, it isn’t hard to imagine their ride bringing Princess Bride fans to the parks in real life.

For more of Jon Plesk’s concept rides inspired by classics like Dr. Strangelove (1964) and National Lampoon’s Vacation (1983), check out his website.

[h/t Nerdist]

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