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The Logic of Time Travel Can Get Pretty Trippy

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Time travel is a common theme in fiction—but writers, artists, and designers all have different ideas of what moving between different points in history would look like, and how these journeys would affect both the traveler and those they encounter. Minute Physics' video below explores the distinctions between time travel as presented in the book Ender's Game, movies like Planet of the Apes and Back to the Future, and the video game Braid, among others.

In Ender’s Game, for example, characters simply experience a slower passage of time while traveling, and the regular world progresses as normal. This means they can't change the past, or influence other characters to make time-altering decisions. This is a far cry from Back to the Future, in which teen Marty McFly nearly prevents his own birth by interfering in his parents' romance.

Get up to speed with the trippiness by watching the Minute Physics video below.

[h/t Futurism]

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The Real Story Behind Jeff Goldblum's Shirtless Jurassic Park Scene Has Finally Been Revealed
Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Never underestimate the power of losing your shirt on the big screen. Urban legend claims that when Clark Gable stripped off his white button-down in 1934’s It Happened One Night, the hysteria surrounding his bare chest caused sales of undershirts to drop 75 percent nationwide in the aftermath. And when Jeff Goldblum showed some skin as Dr. Ian Malcolm in 1993’s Jurassic Park, it helped turn him from a reliable character actor into one of the internet’s favorite people.

Like so many iconic movie moments, there was nothing in the script telling Goldblum to unbutton—this exercise in the timeless art of seduction was completely his call. In an interview with Yahoo!, the actor recalled that part of the reason he made the decision was to add a little more believability to the moment.

“It’s supposed to be Costa Rica, right? So things are hot and I’m sure I’m in some sort of fever,” Goldblum said. “So all the logic is that we gotta get some of these wet clothes off immediately. As I remember, I don’t think anybody fought me on that.”

According to Uproxx, during a recent interview with the movie’s cast and crew for its 25th anniversary, Kong: Skull Island director Jordan Vogt-Roberts corroborated the story with Jurassic Park’s assistant director. So not only was this a spur-of-the-moment decision, but no one on the set even thought it was a big deal.

The decision to let Goldblum bare all (or at least some) paid off handsomely, as the scene has become the source of countless memes, YouTube parodies, and even toys and magnet books 25 years later. And it’s doubly satisfying that such an insignificant, improvised moment could become so memorable for Goldblum, whose character of Malcolm is a chaos theorist with an understanding of how insignificant actions can have huge, unintended consequences.

The legend of Ian Malcolm continues on June 22 when the character makes his return in Jurassic Park: Fallen Kingdom.

[h/t: Uproxx]

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Doctor Who Creator Reveals His One Regret About the Revival’s First Episode
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When Doctor Who staged its big comeback in 2005, few people were more excited than Russell T. Davies, the series’ head writer and executive producer and a longtime Whovian who had spent years rallying the BBC to let him bring the landmark sci-fi series back. Though The Doctor’s second coming has been a hit since it first debuted, Davies recently revealed the one regret he has about "Rose," the revival’s first episode: that he didn’t call Rose a “tart.”

The scene in question occurs at about the 12:10 mark in the video below. It’s from "Rose," the episode that first introduces us to the Ninth Doctor (Christopher Eccleston) and his soon-to-be-faithful companion Rose Tyler (Billie Piper), who are being terrorized by a plastic arm (for reasons that require you to watch the whole thing to understand).

Though it has been more than a dozen years since the episode first premiered, Davies recently had the chance to revisit it when he wrote a novelization of the “Rose” script for BBC Books.

"It was actually hard work, I've got to be honest," Davies told Digital Spy of revisiting the series in prose form. “I kind of thought, 'This'll be a laugh!' and then as I sat down with an empty page and realized it had to be 40,000 words, the horror set in. After 1000 words, I was sitting there going, '39,000 more?!'—I was glad I was allowed enough time. It was great fun, though ... and it's kind of a kick up the arse for it as well."

It was during that process that a simple line occurred to Davies that he wished he had thought of back in 2005.

"[Rose's mom] Jackie Tyler finds Rose on the floor, on top of a broken coffee table with the Ninth Doctor, rolling around with a plastic arm ... and Jackie says, 'Rose Tyler— you tart!,’” he explained of the reimagined version.

"Why didn't I think of that in 2003? Why? I love that line. I literally sat there banging my head going, 'That's the end of that scene!,' because if you watch that scene [on television], it just kind of ends ... so you go, 'That's it, she comes out the bedroom and finds them, rolling on the floor!' Brilliant! So little moments like that were a joy.”

Davies isn’t the only Doctor Who writer who has been tapped to novelize a script for BBC Books's "Target Collection"; the latest installments include Paul Cornell's rendition of “Twice Upon a Time,” the 2017 Christmas special that gave viewers their first glimpse of Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor, while Steven Moffat is tackling “The Day of the Doctor,” which saw the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors (David Tennant and Matt Smith) team up for a 50th anniversary special.

“I was very envious of Steven," Davies admitted of Moffat’s assignment. "I was very happy with what I'd done, and then I read Steven's and I thought, 'Oh, mine's just set on a council estate and a shop.' At most, the Southbank! He's on Gallifrey and back in history with Elizabeth I and there's the Time War … I would've loved to have written that.”

[h/t: Digital Spy]

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