Sam Adams's New $200 Beer Might Be Illegal in Your State

Sam Adams
Sam Adams

If you don’t have a high tolerance, Sam Adams’s latest beer could be more of a conversation piece than anything you want to imbibe. That is, if you can even get ahold of the $200 brew at all. The 2017 release of Utopias, the beer maker's biennial barrel-aged specialty, has a staggering 28 percent alcohol-by-volume (ABV) content—making it illegal in some places in the U.S.

According to Thrillist, Utopias’s unusually high ABV makes it unwelcome in 12 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, New Hampshire, both North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington. While a typical beer is between 4 and 7 percent ABV, your average distilled spirit can be 40 percent ABV (also known as 80 proof) or more. So what's the big deal with a 28 percent ABV drink? It turns out, those states have laws limiting the strength of beer, many of them holdovers from the end of Prohibition. Sorry, Alabama beer obsessives.

Assuming you’re legally able to buy a bottle of Utopias, what can you expect? Sam Adams says it has flavors reminiscent of "dark fruit, subtle sweetness, and a deep rich malty smoothness," but the beer won’t be bubbly, according to Fortune, since at that level, the alcohol devours any CO2. You should think of it more as a fine liquor or cognac than a craft beer. And you should pour it accordingly, Sam Adams recommends, in 1-ounce servings.

The 2017 Utopias run will be limited to 13,000 bottles. The brew goes on sale for $200 in early December.

[h/t Thrillist]

Kalsarikänni, or Getting Drunk in Your Underwear, Is Finland's Version of Hygge

iStock/CatLane
iStock/CatLane

Hygge, the Danish term that loosely translates to "coziness," doesn't have an exact English equivalent, but that hasn't kept the concept from gaining an international following. It has even made it into the Oxford English Dictionary. Hygge has opened the world up to a whole universe of comforting concepts—often, but not always Scandinavian or Nordic in origin—that encompass the full breadth of amazing, underrated life experiences. Enter kalsarikänni, a Finnish term that we just learned about from The Guardian.

Kalsarikänni is the Finnish concept of taking off your pants and getting sloshed on your couch. The term roughly translates to "pantsdrunk" and means drinking at home, alone, in your underwear. Whereas terms like hygge or the Swedish lagom (meaning "just the right amount") imply a certain wholesomeness, kalsarikänni (here's how to pronounce it) celebrates an activity that is indulgent, selfish, and so, so satisfying.

Though the term involves staying home, you don't necessarily need to be totally alone to enjoy kalsarikänni. It can also be accomplished with a good friend, roommate, or partner. And while you can do it in your underwear, pajamas are also acceptable. It just has to be comfortable.

Take it from Miska Rantanen, whose new book, Pantsdrunk: Kalsarikanni: The Finnish Path to Relaxation, is all about the subject. (Its UK title is the more descriptive Pantsdrunk: The Finnish Art of Drinking at Home. Alone. In Your Underwear.) Here are the steps he suggests in The Guardian:

"Pack the fridge full of budget-brand artisanal beer, stock up on dips, crisps and chocolate—and make sure you have the latest psychological drama ready to watch on Netflix. When you get home, immediately strip off your outer layers of clothing (the basic rule: take off anything that's even mildly uncomfortable or formal). Dressing for pantsdrunk generally means undressing. Gradually you'll reach the most pleasurable moment of your striptease: the slow peeling off of your sweaty socks from your feet, a sensation that deserves its own Scandi expression. Now saunter to the kitchen and grab one of the cold beers from the fridge. Sink down on the sofa in your underwear and let out a deep sigh of relief."

Doesn't that sound wonderful? We know what we'll be doing tonight, that's for sure.

And yes, there is an emoji for it.

[h/t The Guardian]

7 Surprising Uses for Vodka

iStock/igorr1
iStock/igorr1

As versatile a liquid as vodka is in a glass—pairing just as well with tomato juice as it does orange juice—it’s equally multipurpose in a non-drinking setting. In honor of National Vodka Day, here are some surprising uses for the popular spirit.

1. ALL-PURPOSE CLEANSER

No Windex? No problem. As a natural disinfectant, all it takes is a quick transfer from liquor bottle to spray bottle to turn vodka into an amazingly powerful all-purpose cleanser that tackles everything from windows and mirrors to countertops and cabinets.

2. DEODORIZER

Typically, spilling a cocktail on yourself would be a good indicator that it’s time to switch to water. But a spritz of vodka on your clothing, be it a musty old sweater or your favorite pair of gym shoes, can actually help freshen you up as it kills odor-causing bacteria on the spot (without leaving any chemical-like scent).

3. MOLD AND MILDEW REMOVER

Vodka’s antimicrobial properties make it a worthy opponent against mold and mildew. The best part? The cheaper the bottle, the less filtered it’s likely to be, which is good news when it comes to killing mold (but not so great when it comes to potential hangovers).

4. INSECT REPELLENT

While several studies have shown that drinking beer can make you more prone to mosquito bites, a quick way to help repel those pesky insects is by spraying yourself with vodka. Just make sure it’s not one a flavored (read: sugary) kind. Though straight-up is the most effective method, because it can leave a scent that lingers, there are a variety of recipes online to make this repellent more palatable to the nose.

5. WEED KILLER

Vodka can help to eliminate garden weeds, but it needs the assistance of the sun. Reader’s Digest suggests mixing one ounce of vodka with two cups of water and a few drops of dish soap, to be applied “at midday on a sunny day to weeds growing in direct sunlight, because the alcohol breaks down the waxy cuticle covering on leaves, leaving them susceptible to dehydration in sunlight. It won’t work in shade.”

6. FLOWER LIFE-EXTENDER

A shot of vodka can be a vase full of fresh flowers’ best friend. According to North Carolina State University horticulture professor John Dole, adding some vodka in with water can help flowers stay fresher longer, most likely as a result of inhibiting ethylene production. As with your own vodka consumption, just don’t overdo it: “Plants—like many people—can only tolerate small concentrations of alcohol,” according to Scientific American.

7. DANDRUFF REMOVER

From frizz to dandruff, vodka has become a go-to solution for a variety of hair care problems. “Vodka has a low pH level and is naturally acidic, which when added to conditioner can help maintain and lower a high pH level found in the hair,” hairstylist Marc Mena said. “[It] has the ability to seal the hair cuticle which will manage and reduce the appearance of frizz, resulting in softer and shinier strands.” Adding a shot of vodka to your bottle of shampoo can also help in relieving itchy scalps, thus reducing dandruff.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2015.

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