Airbnb is Giving Away a One-Night Stay in Denmark's LEGO House

Airbnb
Airbnb

The LEGO toy company opened its 130,000-square-foot LEGO house in Billund, Denmark, at the end of September. The attraction, which contains 25 million interlocking bricks used to make everything from furniture to dinosaurs, is a LEGO-lover’s fantasy. Now fans of the toy brand can enter for a chance to spend the night there.

For one night only, one lucky family will be invited to stay at the LEGO house after hours as part of a collaboration with Airbnb. The vacation begins with superstar LEGO set designer Jamie Berard greeting the guests upon arrival. Later, the family heads to the dining room to construct their food orders out of LEGO bricks. After the plastic requests are sent to the kitchen, edible versions of the meals are served by robot waiters.

The rest of the day consists of exploring the house’s galleries and experience zones. Guests can appreciate life-sized LEGO sculptures, browse iconic sets, or assemble their own one-of-a-kind creations. But the highlight of the trip has to be the suite where the family spends the night. The armchairs, books, alarm clocks, television, and pet cat are all constructed out of LEGO bricks. One of the only features that isn’t made of blocky plastic is the bed, which is nestled in a pool of bricks beneath a rainbow LEGO waterfall.

Living room made out of LEGO bricks.
Airbnb

“This really is a dream come true for any family with a passion for LEGO,” James McClure, Airbnb’s General Manager for Northern Europe, said in a statement. “I doubt there will be much sleeping as there is so much to enjoy in this incredible space.”

To enter, candidates must answer the question, “If you and your family had an infinite supply of LEGO bricks, what would you build?” in 50 to 550 characters. Submissions are open through November 16 and the winner and up to three guests will be flown to Denmark to commence their stay on November 24. The chosen visitors should be prepared to follow the house rules: LEGO-proof slippers are recommended, play is mandatory, and diving in the LEGO pool in search of that “one rare brick” is forbidden.

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Feeling Stressed? Playing Tetris Could Help Relieve Your Anxiety

iStock/Radachynskyi
iStock/Radachynskyi

When Nintendo released their handheld Game Boy system in the U.S. and Japan in 1989, the first game most users experimented with was Tetris. Bundled with the system, the clever puzzler—which prompts players to line up a descending array of tiles to create horizontal lines—was the video game equivalent of an addictive drug. Some players described seeing the shapes in their dreams. The game was in the hands of 35 million portable players; by 2010, it had sold 100 million smartphone downloads.

Now, there’s evidence that Tetris players may have a solution to anxiety in the palms of their hands. According to a paper published in the journal Emotion, Tetris has the capability to relieve stress and troubling thoughts by providing a form of distraction.

As part of a larger study about the benefits of distraction, researchers at the University of California, Riverside conducted an experiment on 309 college students who were told to expect some anxiety-provoking news: They were told someone would be offering an evaluation of their physical attractiveness. While they waited for their results, a third of the subjects played a slow-moving, beginner-level version of Tetris; another group played a high-speed variation; and a third played an adaptive version, which automatically adjusted the speed of the game based on the player’s abilities.

Tetris games that were too slow or too fast bored or frustrated players, respectively. But the game that provided a moderate challenge helped reduce the subjects’ perception of their stress levels. They reported a quarter-point higher level of positive emotions on a five-point scale and a half-point reduction of negative emotions. The students still worried about the results of the attractiveness evaluation, but they experienced fewer negative feelings about it.

The key, according to the study, is that the students were experiencing “flow,” a state of mind in which you’re so engrossed in an activity that you lose your sense of self-awareness. While Tetris may be one of the best ways to quickly fall into flow, anything that consumes your attention—playing music, drawing, cooking—is likely to work.

The next time you have to wait for potentially life-altering news, you may find that a Tetris session will help you cope.

[h/t NPR]

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