Nudibranchs, the Butterflies of the Sea, May Also Be Ruthless 'Kleptopredators'

Wilfred Hdez, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Wilfred Hdez, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

There's nothing ruder than taking someone's food without asking—except maybe waiting until they're finished eating and consuming them whole so you can get those extra calories. As Gizmodo reports, this way of feeding, dubbed "kleptopredation," may be how at least one group of mollusks prefers to take its meals.

In their recent study published in the journal Biology Letters, European scientists explored the eating habits of nudibranchs. Nudibranchs are soft-bodied sea slugs that are sometimes called "butterflies of the sea" for their colorful appearances. The striking sea creatures are also effective carnivores, preying on sponges, anemones, and occasionally other nudibranchs.

For their experiment, the researchers placed members of a nudibranch species known as the pilgrim hervia (Cratena peregrina) in a tank with one of their favorite treats: hydroids, a relative of jellyfish. Plankton were also present for the hydroids to eat. When given a choice between the empty-stomached hydroids and hydroids that had just consumed or were in the middle of consuming plankton, the nudibranchs chose the well-nourished prey in 14 out of the 25 trials. According to the study authors, plankton can make up at least half of the nudibranch diet this way even though it's being preyed upon indirectly. This means that a nudibranch's interactions with a plankton-loving cnidarian could go beyond the basic predator-prey relationship.

Though the nudibranchs' preference for hydroids that had eaten plankton wasn't random, that doesn't automatically mean it's a case of kleptopredation. It's possible that the sea slugs simply chose the prey that looked larger, or they went after the hydroids that had just fed because the stinging cells the cnidarians use to hunt were worn out and therefore less harmful.

If more research does support the theory that the animals target full prey before giving them a chance to digest, that would add the unique predation method to the already impressive roster of nudibranch abilities.

[h/t Gizmodo]

Wasps Are Getting Drunk and Terrorizing People in England

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iStock

Go home, wasps. You’re drunk.

Thousands of “boozy wasps” are terrorizing the UK after imbibing the nectar of fermented fruit and cider left behind at pub gardens, Travel + Leisure reports. Experts warn that there’s a greater risk of getting stung at this time of year, especially while boozing outdoors or eating sweet foods.

The sudden change in diet highlights an issue with the insects' food supply: Wasps typically drink a kind of sugar-spit produced by larvae, but the hive queens have already stopped laying larvae by this time of year, and wasps have been unable to get their fill. They also carry a genetic trait that makes them go crazy for sugary foods and alcohol, and other factors have escalated the problem. For one, last year's cold winter translated to an early wasp season, which allowed them to build larger-than-normal nests.

"Wasps have built absolutely massive nests and, now that all the larvae have grown up and the queen has stopped laying eggs, the colonies have a workforce with nothing to do—and nothing to eat," pest control expert Shane Jones told the Daily Mail. "So they go down to the pub, obviously."

What they really want is sugar, which can be found in fermented fruit, cider, and fruity beers. Because wasps are lightweights, just one sip will get them drunk—and you don’t want to see them when they’re tipsy. "Wasps can't handle their booze, so they get tanked-up and fighty—like lager louts,” Jones says. Alcohol can make the insects more irritable and more likely to sting people.

The best way to avoid the problem, according to Dee Ward-Thompson, technical manager at the British Pest Control Association, is to keep the sugary goodies they're craving out of sight. “Maybe the most influential factor on wasp numbers is when people do not dispose of their waste properly, especially food with a high sugar content, such as fruit," Ward-Thompson told the Nottingham Post. “We always advise waste to be securely bagged and held within a clean container, away from where young children might play.”

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Animal Sanctuary on the Greek Island of Syros Wants to Pay You to Take Care of 55 Cats

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iStock

Before you can fully commit to becoming a cat person, you need the space and the money to support your feline family. Thankfully, a cat sanctuary in Greece is willing to offer you all of the above. As TIME reports, God's Little People Cat Rescue wants to pay you to move to the island of Syros and look after all 55 of its cats.

According to the listing posted to the shelter's Facebook page, the job comes with an undisclosed salary; a small, semidetached house with fully covered utilities; and a private garden with views of the Aegean Sea. You will be responsible for feeding the cats, giving them their medicine, and handling all the general duties that come with running a cat sanctuary. The ideal candidate has some veterinary training, is 45 or older, and can drive the cats to the vet in a manual-transmission car if necessary. The job also requires you to handle feral and/or non-sociable cats at times, so it's best if you have some "cat-whispering skills."

The posting reads, "We are located in a secluded nature preserved area which is very tranquil and quiet in winter time but busy during the summer. You’ll no doubt thrive best if you are the type of person who appreciates nature and likes tranquility—and rest[s] comfortably in your own company. That said, you’ll never feel lonely in the company of the cats and you’ll be expected to live with a small handful of cats in your house."

After a volunteer period of a few weeks, you will be working about four hours a day for a minimum of six months beginning November 1, 2018. To apply, send your photo and resume to joanbowell@yahoo.com. There are plenty of cat photos from the sanctuary to peruse online as you wait for a response.

[h/t TIME]

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