How 9 Countries Celebrate Father's Day

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iStock

Happy Father’s Day! This year, are you thinking of honoring your pop by wearing pink, drinking Schnapps in the woods and touching his feet with your forehead? Turns out you’re not alone in celebrating this way. 

1. IN THAILAND

Father’s Day in Thailand isn’t until December 5th. And that’s because the day coincides with the birthday of their current king (in this case, Bhumibol Adulyadej). It’s also a recent tradition to wear pink, after King Bhumibol was seen in 2007 leaving a hospital in a pink blazer following a health scare. Another (fading) custom involves Thais giving the gift of a Canna flower to their fathers and grandfathers. So, if you’re not looking forward to a day of Buds at Applebee’s, do we have an alternative for you!

2. IN RUSSIA

The closest thing to Father’s Day here is Defender of the Fatherland Day, originally established to commemorate the establishment of the Red Army during the Russian Civil War. Now observed on February 23rd, it is a day to honor not only those serving in the military, but men in general. Thus, in addition to getting gifts from their children, fathers can sometimes expect gifts from female co-workers. Twice as many ties to not wear!

3. IN NEPAL

The country’s Gokarna Aunsi is not actually celebrated until late summer, and it’s not officially a Father’s Day in the Western sense. In fact, its name literally translates to “cow eared no moon night.” So where does pops factor in? Well, not only does he get some gifts, he is honored to be touched on his feet by his son’s forehead. Hopefully, one of the gifts in question was socks.

4. IN ROMANIA

There’s not much unusual about Father’s Day here … other than there finally is one. Romania is notable in that it was the last EU nation to have a Father’s Day, which wasn’t made official until 2010. This change largely came due to the efforts of a group called TATA, or the Alliance Fighting Discrimination Against Fathers. 

5., 6. and 7. IN ITALY, SPAIN AND PORTUGAL

Father’s Day in these predominantly Catholic nations coincides with the Feast of St. Joseph, an observation in honor of guys named Joe, carpenters, things like that. However, since the Feast falls on March 19th, it comes right in the middle of Lent, meaning—gasp!—no meat. On Father’s Day. You might as well take your mom out for a night of MMA while you’re at it.

8. IN GERMANY

Now here’s a place that gets it right—or at least did get it right. First of all, Father’s Day (Vatertag) here is a federal holiday.  Secondly, the traditional celebration involves men going on hikes in the woods pulling wagons loaded with beer and schnapps. Then they get loaded. Sadly, in modern times, this celebration has essentially devolved into an amateur-hour pub crawl, but hey, the idea was sound.

9. IN THE UNITED STATES

We’re guessing you are up on how Father’s Day is celebrated here in the states: a call to your pop. However, unlike Mother’s Day, you seem to not have any trouble sticking your parental unit with the charges. This traditionally makes Father’s Day the busiest day of the year for collect calls … and makes you kind of a cheapskate. 

What Happened to the Physical Copy of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' Speech?

AFP, Getty Images
AFP, Getty Images

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and gave a speech for the ages, delivering the oratorical masterpiece "I Have a Dream" to nearly 250,000 people.

When he was done, King stepped away from the podium, folded his speech, and found himself standing in front of George Raveling, a former Villanova basketball player who, along with his friend Warren Wilson, had been asked to provide extra security around Dr. King while he was speaking. "We were both tall, gangly guys," Raveling told TIME in 2003. "We didn't know what we were doing but we certainly made for a good appearance."

Moved by the speech, Raveling saw the folded papers in King’s hands and asked if he could have them. King gave the young volunteer the speech without hesitation, and that was that.

“At no time do I remember thinking, ‘Wow, we got this historic document,’” Raveling told Sports Illustrated in 2015. Not realizing he was holding what would become an important piece of history in his hands, Raveling went home and stuck the three sheets of paper into a Harry Truman biography for safekeeping. They sat there for nearly two decades while Raveling developed an impressive career coaching NCAA men’s basketball.

In 1984, he had recently taken over as the head coach at the University of Iowa and was chatting with Bob Denney of the Cedar Rapids Gazette when Denney brought up the March on Washington. That's when Raveling dropped the bomb: “You know, I’ve got a copy of that speech," he said, and dug it out of the Truman book. After writing an article about Raveling's connection, the reporter had the speech professionally framed for the coach.

Though he displayed the framed speech in his house for a few years, Raveling began to realize the value of the piece and moved it to a bank vault in Los Angeles. Though he has received offers for King’s speech—one collector wanted to purchase the speech for $3 million in 2014—Raveling has turned them all down. He has been in talks with various museums and universities and hopes to put the speech on display in the future, but for now, he cherishes having it in his possession.

“That to me is something I’ll always be able to look back and say I was there,” Raveling said in the original Cedar Rapids Gazette article. “And not only out there in that arena of people, but to be within touching distance of him. That’s like when you’re 80 or 90 years old you can look back and say ‘I was in touching distance of Abraham Lincoln when he made the Gettysburg Address.’"

“I have no idea why I even asked him for the speech,” Raveling, now CEO of Coaching for Success, has said. “But I’m sure glad that I did.”

Mardi Gras King Cake Ice Cream Is Coming to a Grocery Store Near You

iStock.com/fstop123
iStock.com/fstop123

Each year, Blue Bell Creamery celebrates Mardi Gras with a limited-edition ice cream that captures the spirit of the festival. Now, for the first time, the once-regional flavor will be available wherever Blue Bell ice cream is sold, KXXV reports.

Blue Bell debuted Mardi Gras King Cake in 2012, and for years it could only be found in places like Louisiana and Alabama. Exclusively available in the months leading up to Mardi Gras, or Shrove Tuesday, the ice cream has become a seasonal favorite in that part of the country. Blue Bell recently announced it's expanding the flavor in response to nationwide interest to cover its entire distribution area in the southern U.S.

Mardi Gras King Cake combines two old Blue Bell flavors: Mardi Gras, which came out in 2004, and King Cake, which launched in 2006. It features pastry pieces, cream cheese swirls, and colorful sprinkles in cinnamon cake-flavored ice cream. (The traditional plastic baby is missing from this version).

Half-gallons of Blue Bell's Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream can be found in stores starting the first week of 2019.

Carton of Blue Bell Mardi Gras King Cake ice cream.
Courtesy of Blue Bell

[h/t KXXV]

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