12 (Mostly) Spooky Halloween Superstitions

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Many centuries before candy corn was invented, the ancient Celts celebrated Samhain on October 31, a night that marked the end of the year and the official start of winter. Samhain, which later became folded into Halloween, was also seen as a night when the dead returned to their former homes—or as the 1903 Encyclopedia of Superstitions, Folklore, Occult Sciences of the World puts it, "the night of all the year that spirits walked abroad and fairies were most bold." Plenty of folklore and superstition once accompanied this evening, and while much of it was concerned with romantic fortune-telling, some lore was significantly spookier. Here are a dozen tidbits from the Encyclopedia of Superstitions to get you in the Halloween mood.

1. In Wales, a disembodied spirit was thought to be sitting on every crossroad and stile on All Hallow’s Eve. (Stiles are small structures that allow humans but not animals to pass over fences.)

1. In the British Isles, it was said to be evil to eat blackberries after Halloween—because on that night “the spirit, called púca [Irish for ghost] comes out and defiles them.”

3. In Scotland, you can secure good luck for yourself by waving around the red-hot end of a fiery stick in certain “mystic figures” (the encyclopedia is unclear about which specific mystic figures are required).

4. Welsh families had an especially creepy bonfire tradition: After building a huge fire, each member of the family would throw in a small white stone they had marked in some way. The next morning, they'd search through the remains of the fire to find the stones. If one was missing, it meant that person wouldn't live to see another Halloween.

5. In the Western Isles, it was considered bad luck to leave your house on Halloween. (Don’t tell modern trick or treaters!)

6. On All-Hallow's Eve, the fishermen of the Orkney Islands made a cross on their boats with tar for good luck. If they weren't successful, they sprinkled " forespoken water" over their boats.

7. Norman seamen who ventured out to sea on Halloween "were said to have the 'double sight,' that is, each one beheld a living likeness of himself seated in close contact, and if he was engaged in any work, the phantom was doing the same."

8. Not all superstitions were spooky, apparently—some had to do with mundane health matters. In some Celtic lands, it was thought that if you eat a large apple under an apple tree at midnight on Halloween wearing only a bed sheet, you would never get a cold.

9. In the days before Weather.com, they thought that whatever direction a bull was facing while lying down on Halloween was the direction from which the wind would blow for most of the winter.

Spooky forest with full orange-colored moon
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10. Children born on Halloween were said to have the "power to see spirits and converse with fairies."

11. As late as the 17th century, it was customary for farmers in Scotland and elsewhere to walk around their fields with a lighted torch, singing or chanting a piece of doggerel verse, in order to protect their fields from harm.

12. Halloween was once called "Witches' Night" or the "Devil's Sunday," and was thought to be the occasion for a major celebration led by His Satanic Majesty. Witches were said to leave sticks in their beds to fool their husbands, and then ride to the festivities on broomsticks anointed with the fat of murdered unbaptized infants—or, failing that, a cat. "All Scotch boys will remember how tired the cats were the day after Hallowe'en," the Encyclopedia of Superstitions and Folklore writes. "Some pitied their miserable appearance; others were mad at them for carrying the witches."

The Most Popular Halloween Candy in Each State

If you've ever argued that no one actually likes candy corn, you're probably not from Alabama, Iowa, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Nevada, or Rhode Island. The controversial confection is a favorite treat among residents in those states, according to sales data from online candy retailer CandyStore.com.

As they've done for more than a decade, the bulk candy retailer combed through 11 years of data (with a particular focus on the months leading up to All Hallows' Eve) to gauge America’s top-selling sweets. They created the interactive map below to display their results.

Source: CandyStore.com.

In addition to the divisive—yet classic—candy corn, Skittles, M&Ms, Snickers, Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, and Starburst were among the nation's favorite candies. Hot Tamales, Tootsie Pops, Jolly Ranchers, and Sour Patch Kids have all earned some candy lovers' devotion, too.

Some states are unique in their top candy choices: Mississippi was the only state to name 3 Musketeers the best, while Connecticut opted for Almond Joy and West Virginia showed their love of Blow Pops. Meanwhile, trick-or-treaters in Kentucky have a sweet tooth for Swedish Fish, Louisianans love Lemonheads, and Delawareans would die for Life Savers.

After seeing which treat is number one in your state, check out the chart below to learn how many pounds of each top-ranking candy are consumed in each state (and then go buy a new toothbrush).

Source: CandyStore.com

Six Flags St. Louis Is Daring Guests to Spend 30 Hours in a Coffin

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Six Flags St. Louis is inviting six guests to stay in the park for 30 straight hours this Halloween season. The only catch: Instead of riding roller coasters, they'll be spending over a full day inside a coffin, WATE reports

As the name suggests, the theme park's Fright Fest 30-Hour Coffin Challenge dares thrill-seekers to experience what it's like to live like the undead. On Saturday, October 13 at 1 p.m., the six chosen participants will crawl into the "slightly used" 2-by-7-foot caskets they'll call home until 7 p.m. the next day.

Compared to being buried alive, the challenge sounds downright cozy. The surrogate cadavers are free to bring pillows, blankets, and sleeping bags into their coffins to make their stay more comfortable. They will be allowed one six-minute bathroom break per hour, and meals, snacks, and drinks will be provided. The coffins have been outfitted with phone charging stations, so inhabitants can Instagram their experiences from the other side.

The challenge will take place during Fright Fest, Six Flags's Halloween celebration, so participants will have to put up with random visits from the 'Fright Fest Freaks' roaming the park. But if they can endure all that, they will be rewarded. Contestants who remain in their coffin for the full 30 hours, not including bathroom breaks, will receive two Six Flags 2019 season passes, a Fright Fest prize package with two VIP haunted house passes, and two tickets to ride the park's haunted train ride. The remaining participants will also be entered into a random drawing to win a $300 prize. And best of all—everyone who completes the challenge gets to take their coffin home with them.

If you're interested in spending one of your October weekends in a coffin, you can enter to participate in the competition by filling out this form and submitting it before midnight on October 3.

[h/t WATE]

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