The Most Popular Horror Movie in Every State, Mapped

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

When you curl up on the couch for a good scare-athon, what movie do you put on? If you’re in Montana, it’s likely to be Dawn of the Dead. In Minnesota? Chances are, it’s Psycho. CableTV.com analyzed Google Trends to figure out the most popular movie in all 50 states, discovering that the movies people search for online can differ quite a bit depending on geography.

Well, sort of. The Ring was inordinately popular, coming in top place in 18 different states. The Silence of the Lambs came in second, as the favorite in five states. Suspiria, the 1977 ballet-school horror movie that’s due for a remake in 2018 (and has been called "the ultimate Halloween movie"), is the most searched-for film in California, Oregon, and New Mexico. But others, like Jaws and Alien are unique to one state, which may tell us something about the terrors of living in Hawaii and Alaska, respectively.

A black map of the United States with the most-searched for horror movie in each state.
CableTV.com

And some states were searching for geographically appropriate films, like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in Texas and The Shining in Colorado—though that might mean people were searching to see where the movies filming locations were, not necessarily that they ended up watching those movies. That is the thing about these maps: You can’t exactly tell whether people were searching for movies to watch or just searching for general trivia to impress their friends at a Halloween party. Maybe everyone in the Midwest really wants to know what the name of the actress who played that creepy girl in The Ring is. Or maybe, everyone in Nebraska really has been watching The Ring all October.

CableTV.com followed up on the data to ask people what the scariest movie they’ve ever seen was. The answer? It, the terrifying movie based on the Stephen King novel. The survey didn’t clarify whether people meant the 1990 miniseries or the 2017 movie, but regardless, one thing seems to unify all Americans, regardless of what state they hail from: that clown is horrifying.

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant

Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.

And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.

You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

Here's How Much Money You Need to Retire Early in Each State

iStock.com/katso80
iStock.com/katso80

If you're complacent with your career, your goals might be limited to grabbing the last office doughnut. But if you have an eye on retirement, you might be wondering how much it's going to take to walk away from the desk forever.

Cost information website How Much has compiled estimates of the savings residents of each state might need in order to retire early at the ages of 35, 45, and 55. The site used figures from GoBankingRates that looked at the cost of living in the various regions and then estimated annual expenses based on age with an average 4 percent withdrawal rate annually.

If you wanted to retire at age 35 in Ohio, for example, having $1.61 million in your savings account would be ideal. In California, you’d need $2.37 million.

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire at age 35 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 45 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 55 in each state
howmuch

The site cautions that this is an oversimplification of what should be some highly individualized financial planning. Everyone has different needs, and the numbers don't account for inflation or for adjusting the 4 percent annual withdrawal. In short, this is nothing you should pass along to your accountant. What these charts can do, however, is spark motivation to make your own plans for having a comfortable retirement. If you want to spend it in Hawaii, it might be best to start saving now.

[h/t Thrillist]

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