The Most Popular Horror Movie in Every State, Mapped

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

When you curl up on the couch for a good scare-athon, what movie do you put on? If you’re in Montana, it’s likely to be Dawn of the Dead. In Minnesota? Chances are, it’s Psycho. CableTV.com analyzed Google Trends to figure out the most popular movie in all 50 states, discovering that the movies people search for online can differ quite a bit depending on geography.

Well, sort of. The Ring was inordinately popular, coming in top place in 18 different states. The Silence of the Lambs came in second, as the favorite in five states. Suspiria, the 1977 ballet-school horror movie that’s due for a remake in 2018 (and has been called "the ultimate Halloween movie"), is the most searched-for film in California, Oregon, and New Mexico. But others, like Jaws and Alien are unique to one state, which may tell us something about the terrors of living in Hawaii and Alaska, respectively.

A black map of the United States with the most-searched for horror movie in each state.
CableTV.com

And some states were searching for geographically appropriate films, like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in Texas and The Shining in Colorado—though that might mean people were searching to see where the movies filming locations were, not necessarily that they ended up watching those movies. That is the thing about these maps: You can’t exactly tell whether people were searching for movies to watch or just searching for general trivia to impress their friends at a Halloween party. Maybe everyone in the Midwest really wants to know what the name of the actress who played that creepy girl in The Ring is. Or maybe, everyone in Nebraska really has been watching The Ring all October.

CableTV.com followed up on the data to ask people what the scariest movie they’ve ever seen was. The answer? It, the terrifying movie based on the Stephen King novel. The survey didn’t clarify whether people meant the 1990 miniseries or the 2017 movie, but regardless, one thing seems to unify all Americans, regardless of what state they hail from: that clown is horrifying.

The Most Popular Condiment in Each State, Mapped

Courtesy of Influenster
Courtesy of Influenster

You can tell a lot about a person by the condiments they put on their tacos, hot dog, or toast. Picky eaters might pair ketchup with steak, many Millennials will avoid mayo at all costs, and fans of sriracha and other spicy toppings are more likely to be thrill seekers. Pay close enough attention to a person's food preferences and you might even be able to guess which state they're from, as a new map spotted by Thrillist suggests.

The map, created by product ratings platform Influenster, shows the most popular condiment from one state to the next. Influenster analyzed more than 50,000 reviews on its site to identify the most-mentioned condiments, and both the number of reviews and overall ratings were taken into account.

The fact that Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing is the top choice in five states probably won't come as a shock, but would you peg Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil as the fan favorite in an equal number of states? And in Michigan and Indiana, the top pick is Bertolli Alfredo with Aged Parmesan Cheese Sauce. There has been some debate over whether these ingredients can be classified as condiments, but Influenster seems to be following a broad definition. Merriam-Webster calls a condiment "something used to enhance the flavor of food," which could really be anything.

Semantics aside, it's clear where Americans' taste buds stand. Frank's RedHot and Nutella are the next most popular condiments, having been identified as the favorite in four states apiece. For some, though, condiments are not only a matter of taste, but also a source of home-state pride. The Asian-style Sriracha chili sauce is actually made in California, where it's the top condiment. Likewise, for Pennsylvanians, Heinz ketchup is the only ketchup. The Heinz company was founded in Pittsburgh, although many of its products are now made elsewhere.

Check out the full list below to see which condiment your fellow residents will be serving with dinner tonight.

Alabama: Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce
Alaska: Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
Arizona: Frank's RedHot Original Cayenne Pepper Sauce
Arkansas: Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing
California: Sriracha Chili Sauce
Colorado: Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
Connecticut: Nutella
Delaware: French's Classic Yellow Mustard
Florida: French's Crunchy Toppers Crispy Jalapenos
Georgia: Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce
Hawaii: Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
Idaho: Hidden Valley Dips Mix Original Ranch
Illinois: Country Crock
Indiana: Bertolli Alfredo with Aged Parmesan Cheese Sauce
Iowa: Hidden Valley Original Ranch Dressing Buttermilk
Kansas: Country Crock
Kentucky: French's Crunchy Toppers Crispy Jalapenos
Louisiana: Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce
Maine: Marshmallow Fluff
Maryland: Frank's RedHot Original Cayenne Pepper Sauce
Massachusetts: Nutella
Michigan: Bertolli Alfredo with Aged Parmesan Cheese Sauce
Minnesota: Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
Mississippi: French's Crunchy Toppers Crispy Jalapenos
Missouri: French's Classic Yellow Mustard
Montana: Skippy Super Chunky Peanut Butter
Nebraska: Sriracha Chili Sauce
Nevada: Hellmann's Real Mayonnaise
New Hampshire: Wish-Bone Balsamic Italian Vinaigrette
New Jersey: Bertolli Vodka Sauce
New Mexico: McCormick Garlic Salt
New York: Nutella
North Carolina: Frank's RedHot Original Cayenne Pepper Sauce
North Dakota: Hellmann's Carefully Crafted Dressing and Sandwich Spread
Ohio: Country Crock Calcium Plus Vitamin D
Oklahoma: Hidden Valley The Original Ranch Dressing Buttermilk
Oregon: Nature's Way Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
Pennsylvania: Heinz Ketchup
Rhode Island: Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar
South Carolina: French's Crunchy Toppers Crispy Jalapenos
South Dakota: JIF Peanut Butter
Tennessee: French's Classic Yellow Mustard
Texas: Frank's RedHot Original Cayenne Pepper Sauce
Utah: Hidden Valley Cucumber Ranch Dressing
Vermont: Skippy Creamy Peanut Butter
Virginia: Nutella
Washington: Sriracha Chili Sauce
West Virginia: Hidden Valley The Original Ranch Dressing Buttermilk
Wisconsin: Hellmann's Real Mayonnaise
Wyoming: Skippy Super Chunky Peanut Butter

[h/t Thrillist]

Want to Buy a House? This Is How Many Hours You Need to Work to Afford One in Your State

iStock.com/jhorrocks
iStock.com/jhorrocks

How much people need to work to afford what is perhaps the most iconic aspect of the American dream—their own house—varies drastically from city to city and state to state. Just as real estate values change with ZIP codes, so, too, do income levels. (Not to mention tax rates and the price of common goods.) To see how attainable owning a home in different cities across the U.S. really is, the cost information site HowMuch.net mapped how many hours someone earning the median income in the country’s biggest cities would need to work just to pay the average mortgage.

To crunch the numbers, the site used Census data to figure out the median hourly income for people in the 98 biggest cites in the U.S., based on the idea that everyone is working 40 hours a week. (Which isn’t very realistic, but still provides a rough estimate.) Then, HowMuch.net used data from Zillow on the median housing prices to calculate the median monthly mortgage price in each of those cities, estimating that people typically get a 30-year mortgage.

Here's the breakdown for the country's most expensive metros:

1. New York, New York: 113 hours
2. Los Angeles, California: 112 hours
3. Miami, Florida: 109 hours
4. San Francisco, California: 107 hours
5. Boston, Massachusetts: 95 hours
6. Oakland, California: 83 hours
7. Long Beach, California: 78 hours
8. San Diego, California: 77 hours
9. Santa Ana, California: 74 hours
10. San Jose, California: 74 hours

California is just as expensive as you thought it was, and that applies to more than just L.A. and Silicon Valley. Long Beach and Orange County's Santa Ana make the list, too, as does sunny San Diego. Those cities pale in comparison to Miami and Boston, though. Someone living in Santa Ana would be able to afford the median mortgage working a full 35 fewer hours than someone in Miami—basically a whole workweek. Of course, that seems much less affordable when you consider that someone in Memphis only has to work 18 hours to afford their mortgage, about a fifth of what someone in San Jose does.

Obviously, there are aspects of this data that don't entirely capture the reality on the ground. Many people work more than 40 hours a week. Interest rates can vary a lot based on credit score, when you took out your mortgage, and other factors. Many households have more than one source of income, and those incomes may not be equal, which change the figures quite a bit. Most importantly, this only reflects the cost of housing. While a mortgage payment is a huge chunk of most people's expenses, this graphic doesn't reflect the cost of other necessities like food, insurance, transportation, and all the other things we have to pay for to get by in any given month.

So, before you plan your move to Memphis, bear in mind that these are just rough estimates. That said, if you do want to move to Memphis, we wouldn't blame you.

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