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31 of America's Most Haunted Spots, Mapped

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Some people get their Halloween thrills and chills from ghost stories, while others prefer getting up close and personal with the paranormal. Fall into the latter category? Skip the fake haunted houses this October and try visiting one of the real-life “haunted” locations listed on this map, which we spotted on Thrillist.

Created by an anonymous Google Maps user, the map identifies 31 purportedly haunted places across the U.S. Some of the locations are obvious choices, like Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the site of the Civil War’s bloodiest battle, or Salem, Massachusetts, which was home to the infamous 17th century witch trials. Others, like the Bell Witch Cave in Adams, Tennessee or Myrtle’s Plantation in St. Francisville, Louisiana, are more obscure. A handful—like the Alamo in San Antonio, Alcatraz Island in San Francisco, and yes, the White House—are even historic landmarks.

The sites have one thing in common: All of them are allegedly filled with restless spirits. Halloween road trip, anyone?

[h/t Thrillist]

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Afternoon Map
The Most Popular Thanksgiving Foods in All 50 States, Mapped
General Mills
General Mills

Not everyone eats (or even likes) turkey on Thanksgiving. The exact food served at the annual U.S. feast varies from household to household according to personal tastes and, more importantly, region. In the South, for example, stuffing might be made with cornbread, while there’s a good chance that anything served in Minnesota will come in a casserole dish.

To highlight regional Turkey Day tastes, General Mills collected data from top recipe searches on BettyCrocker.com, Pillsbury.com, and the cooking website Tablespoon.com from November 1, 2016 through Thanksgiving Day 2016. They compiled the state-by-state findings into a map so we could see what Americans like to chow down on during the holiday.

It turns out, home chefs in Georgia, South Carolina, Delaware, and North Carolina largely searched for sweet potato dishes, while West Virginians, Ohioans, and Pennsylvanians wanted to make buffalo chicken dip. And oddly enough, the denizens of two landlocked states—Arizona and Wisconsin—sought out shrimp recipes.

Proving that some Thanksgiving desserts are relatively universal, however, residents of six states—including South Dakota, South Carolina, Oklahoma, North Carolina, New Mexico, and New Hampshire—all looked for various types of pie.

Check out the full findings in the map below.

A map by General Mills depicting the most popular Thanksgiving food in each state
General Mills
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Afternoon Map
Map: All 50 States Reimagined as Food Puns

Pun enthusiasts will recall that we've covered Chris Durso's Foodnited States of America before. Now the project, which was inspired by Durso's young son, is available in map form in the Foodiggity store.


If you can't figure all of these out on the map above, here's the complete list and a larger image of each state's selection.

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