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From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
W.D.F. VINCENT, Archive.org // Public Domain

Party Like It's 1790 With These Free Historical Costume Patterns

From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
W.D.F. VINCENT, Archive.org // Public Domain

If you’re quick with a sewing needle, there’s still time to throw together a great Halloween costume on the cheap. You can take outfit ideas straight out of the pages of history thanks to costume designer and cosplayer Artemisia Moltabocca, who collects historical clothing patterns on her site, as My Modern Met highlights.

Moltabocca’s site, CostumingDiary.com, pulls from sources across the web—from low-budget pattern blogs and history sites to authorities such as the Missouri Historical Society and LACMA—to bring you guides to making historically accurate fashion designs.

An illustration from a 1927 French magazine shows two women in fur coats.
From a January 1927 issue of La Femme De France
Archive.org // Public Domain

Want to whip up a silk men’s suit circa 1770? There’s a pattern in PDF form here. If you really want to get historically accurate with your costume, how about a 1910 bra pattern or a guide to making 1950s underwear? The online collection includes outfits for both men and women sourced from all eras dating back to the 1700s.

For more ideas, check out CostumingDiary.com or Moltabocca’s Pinterest board of historical costume patterns.

[h/t My Modern Met]

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From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
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These Suitcases Convert Into a Mini Kitchen, Office, or Bed
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iStock

Finally, a product has been released to appease travelers who have long demanded a suitcase they can cook scrambled eggs on. A new line by Italian designer Marc Sadler, spotted by Lonely Planet, features three aluminum suitcases that can be converted into either a mini kitchen, a work station, or even a bed.

A cooktop suitcase
Marc Sadler

The cook station suitcase will soon be released as part of the special edition Bank collection, which will be sold by suitcase brand Fabbrica Pelletterie Milano. It comes with built-in power, a cooktop, mini fridge, several drawers with cutlery, and a foldable chopping table.

Those who travel often for work may want to opt instead for the workstation suitcase, which features a pull-out chair, work surface, electrical outlets, and wooden drawers. Ideal for camping, the bed station comes with a fold-out wooden frame and mattress topper. It also happens to be the most expensive of the three, at a cost of €6900 ($8135).

A suitcase converts to a pull-out bed
Marc Sadler

A suitcase with a built-in desk and drawers
Marc Sadler

It's unclear whether these suitcases would make it through airport security, but TSA does permit camp stoves as long as they don't have fuel inside them. Don't try to make breakfast while waiting at your gate, though—there are probably rules against that.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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From The Cutters' Practical Guide To The Cutting Of Ladies' Garments, 1890
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Art
This Wall Chart Shows Every Oil Painting Vincent Van Gogh Ever Created
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Vincent van Gogh, among other things, was a prolific painter. He created 85 oil paintings of women, 70 of flowers, 42 of wheat fields, and 38 of his own image. The Post-Impressionist master’s nearly 900 oil paintings can now be seen all in one place, thanks to a new wall chart from Curious Charts.

A chart of Van Gogh's paintings
Curious Charts

In this “Visual Taxonomy of Van Gogh,” the painter’s oeuvre is organized into a few categories, like still lifes and landscapes, and further broken down into subcategories such as water and bridges, wheat, and trees. Timothy Sanders, who runs Curious Charts with his wife, Aurélia, said he started out by organizing Van Gogh’s works into categories in an Excel spreadsheet.

“When we had the idea of trying to fit all of Van Gogh’s paintings, which is almost 900 in total, onto a single poster-sized chart, it was really exciting,” he says in the video below. “But as we quickly discovered, there were a lot of challenges.”

Size and spacing were the biggest issues, and the 24-inch-by-36-inch poster took three months to create. There are notations underneath each image specifying the title of the work and the year it was painted.

The Sanders duo is raising funds for the project via Kickstarter, and so far they've raised nearly $1500 of their $2000 goal. The fundraising campaign ends June 14.

Scroll down to see more photos of the chart, plus a video showing how it was made.

Details of the Van Gogh chart
Curious Charts

Details of the Van Gogh chart
Curious Charts

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