Why Not Brushing Your Teeth Is So Bad For Your Health

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Even if you lie about flossing, consume a steady diet of sugar, and haven't been to the dentist in years, the very least you can do for your mouth is brush your teeth twice a day. Regular brushing is a basic hygiene practice that's observed across the globe, but just how necessary is it to human survival? In their new video, Life Noggin explains why the benefits of brushing extend beyond your pearly whites.

If you stopped brushing your teeth, all the bacteria and bits of food normally cleared out by your twice-daily cleanings would thrive unchecked. Cavities would start to form, your gums would become inflamed, and your breath would reach room-clearing levels of stench. But the sorry state of your mouth would be just a fraction of the problem. With the opening acting as a haven for germs, harmful bacteria like MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus would have a greater likelihood of surviving there long enough to enter your bloodstream. A dirty mouth can also nourish the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bug that causes an advanced stage of gingivitis that may lead plaque to build up inside the arteries if it enters the heart. So when your dentist harps on you about brushing regularly, they're not being overly dramatic.

With the potential to prevent life-threatening conditions, you may wonder how the rest of the animal kingdom gets along without oral hygiene. While some creatures have developed teeth that replace themselves quickly or teeth that resist erosion, others make their own toothbrushes. Elephants, for example, wipe bacteria off their tusks whenever they scrape bark from a tree or dig a hole. Humans in ancient times used a similar method: Before the first toothbrush was invented, they would chew on bark and scrub their teeth with the tattered ends to get that refreshing clean feeling.

Check out the full story from Life Noggin in the video below.

[h/t Life Noggin]

9 Surprising Facts About the Scientific Study of Sex

vadimguzhva/iStock via Getty Images
vadimguzhva/iStock via Getty Images

The scientific study of sex is much more exciting than an awkward sex ed class. While writing my book Sex Weird-o-Pedia, these were some of the most interesting facts about science and sex that I came across.

1. Some sex researchers didn't want their findings to get into the wrong hands.

The pioneering sex researcher Richard von Krafft-Ebing didn’t want his knowledge in the hands of ordinary folk. So he wrote Psychopathia Sexualis, the founding document of modern sexology—which was published in Germany in 1886 then translated and published in English in 1939—in Latin to discourage regular Joes (and/or Janes) from reading it.

2. You burn more calories mowing the lawn than you do having sex.

Young woman poses for selfie while mowing the lawn
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Sex might seem strenuous when things get hot and heavy, but it's usually not that great of a workout. You'd have to go at it for nearly 200 minutes to burn as much energy having sex as you do during a 30-minute run. Even mowing the lawn burns about three times more calories than sex. According to the British Heart Foundation, sex burns about the same amount of energy per minute as ironing clothes.

3. A surprising number of mothers claim to be virgins.

In a 2013 study of several thousand pregnant women in the U.S. published by BMJ, about 1 percent of the participants claimed they were virgins when they gave birth. This, of course, calls into question the veracity of studies that rely on self-reported sexual behaviors.

4. Penicillin may have ignited the sexual revolution.

One economist says that penicillin, and not the birth control pill, was the real enabler of the sexual revolution. A study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior in 2013 shows that penicillin contributed to a 75 percent decline in the number of deaths caused by syphilis from 1947 to 1957. Since the new treatment made sex safer, people started having riskier sex, which resulted in increases in the numbers of children born out of wedlock and teenage pregnancies.

5. Twins can have different dads.

A photo of fraternal twins
Aleksandr Zhurilo/iStock via Getty Images

While it is very rare, it is possible for fraternal twins to have two different fathers. What’s more common is for a rom-com to be based on this scenario.

6. Gender may influence how people handle sexual jealousy.

Research from evolutionary psychologists indicates that people’s gender influences how they react to sexual jealousy. For men, they react more strongly to sexual unfaithfulness than emotional infidelity. For women, it is the reverse. The theory behind these behaviors comes back to evolution: Males who were intolerant toward their wives becoming sexually active with other men were less likely to become an object of derision and more likely to see their own genes pass onto future generations. Women who prevented their husbands from emotionally bonding with other women reduced the chances of the men spending their resources on other women.

7. One of Ivan Pavlov's colleagues created his own (slightly x-rated) conditioning experiment with dogs.

You’re probably aware of Russian researcher Ivan Pavlov and his famous conditioning experiment in which he trained a dog to salivate at the sound of a bell. What you might not know is that one of Pavlov’s American students, W. Horsley Gantt, conditioned dogs to become sexually aroused when they heard specific tones. The experiment, according to Mandy Merck's In Your Face: 9 Sexual Studies, was intended "to study conflicts of the drives between ... experimentally induced anxiety states and sexual excitement."

8. Couples whose first child is a girl are more likely to get divorced.

Parents pay attention to their phones instead of their daughter
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Married couples whose first child is a girl are more likely to get divorced than those whose first child is a boy. Scientists are split as to why this is. One theory is that female embryos are better able to endure maternal stress than male embryos, so pregnant women in unhappy marriages are less likely to have a miscarriage if the child they are bearing is a girl. But once they have a daughter, these couples are more likely to split up since there were already fissures in their relationship prior to the child’s birth.

9. There's a link between pubic hair and STIs.

A downside of pubic grooming is that it might raise STI risk. In a study conducted by a University of Texas scholar, people who regularly shaved their pubic areas contracted STIs about 80 percent more often than those who never shaved down there. One suggestion is that those who regularly shave are more likely to tear their skin, making it easier for viruses to enter the body.

Ross Benes is the author of Sex Weird-o-Pedia: The Ultimate Book of Shocking, Scandalous, and Incredibly Bizarre Sex Facts.

Airplane Water Quality Is Even Worse Than Previously Believed

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anyaberkut/iStock via Getty Images

While air travel is convenient, there's never any promise it will be particularly clean. Security checkpoint bins and airplane tray tables are notorious for harboring germs. In addition to being careful of what you touch, you need to be cautious about what you drink.

Air travelers have been warned in the past about the questionable water quality of major airlines. Owing to inconsistent water transport issues, storage methods, and lackadaisical monitoring, several studies and investigations—including a 2004 report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)—have found bacterial contamination and even insect eggs lurking in liquid served to passengers in the form of coffee and tea.

Unfortunately, the problem doesn’t appear to be getting any better. A new study on the quality of airline tap water conducted by the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center found E. coli, coliform bacteria, and other unpleasantries across 11 commercial and 12 regional carriers.

The study ranked airlines according to water quality tests, and whether airlines were forthcoming in disclosing how they handle water transportation and storage for in-flight plumbing, using a scale of 1 to 5. While some airlines, like Alaska and Allegiant, scored well at 3.3, others (including JetBlue, Spirit, Delta, and United) ranked poorly in terms of delivering healthy, clean water, which is often sourced from local municipalities.

Low scores also indicated a lack of transparency about the airlines' water monitoring process. Moving the water from its source through hoses and tanks can create opportunities for the water to become contaminated.

How can questionable water be served? While the EPA introduced an Aircraft Drinking Water Rule in 2011 that mandated quarterly cleanings of airplane holding tanks and bacteria tests, Condé Nast Traveler reports that the agency does little to enforce it, typically opting not to issue fines to airlines found to be in violation of the terms.

The study’s authors recommend people avoid drinking tap water, coffee, or tea while on airplanes and should instead opt for bottled water. Because the stored water is also used for lavatory sinks, it’s possible you might introduce germs to your hands even after “cleaning” them. Hand sanitizer is recommended.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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