13 Words That Knocked Out Scripps National Spelling Bee Finalists

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The 87th Annual Scripps National Spelling Bee ended in a draw! Sriram Hathwar (right) and Ansun Sujoe are the first co-champions since 1962. If this year's Bee inspires you to brush up on your spelling, here are some words that have knocked out recent runners-up.

1. Schwarmerei, 2012 & 2004.

Note to future contestants: Learn the correct spelling of this German origin noun, which means excessive sentimentality, as it has knocked out two contestants in the final round in the past decade. One was 13-year-old Akshay Buddiga in 2004, who had famously fainted on stage only to get back up and correctly spell “alopecoid” earlier in the competition.

2. Sorites, 2011.

Concluding that there was a “p” at the beginning of this noun, which is a type of argument that has several successive premises leading to one conclusion, was the undoing of Canadian Laura Newcombe.

3. Terribilita, 2010.

An expression of intense anger or emotion, particularly in the conception or execution of a work of art. (Or the losing of a spelling competition? Three students tied for second place in 2010.)

4. Rhytidome, 2010.

The outermost layer of the bark of a tree.

5. Ochidore, 2010.

A little-used word for a shore crab. “Crustacean” would have been so much easier!

6. Menhir, 2009.

An upright stone or monolith, typically of prehistoric origin, knocked one contestant down in 2009.

7. Maecenas, 2009.

A patron of the arts, and nemesis to 12-year-old Tim Ruiter, who tied for second place in 2009.

8. Prosopopoeia, 2008.

A figure of speech in which an imaginary or absent person is speaking or acting caused 12-year-old first-timer Sidharth Chand to disappear in 2008.

9. Coryza, 2007.

A contagious disease affecting the upper respiratory tract. Damn those colds!

10. Weltschmerz, 2006.

A state of depression or apathy as a result of accepting the actual state of the world as opposed to an idealized version. Yep, sounds about right.  

11. Roscian, 2005.

An adjective used to describe a skilled actor, a tribute to Roman actor Quintus Roscius Gallus, who died in 62 BC. Like a pre-Julian Philip Seymour Hoffman.

12. Trouvaille, 2004.

Californian Aliya Deri didn’t consider this word—meaning windfall—much of a lucky break when it landed her in second place in 2004.

13. Gnathonic, 2003.

The “g” is silent in this adjective (which means fawning or obsequious), which explains its unfortunate omission in eighth-grader Evelyn Blacklock’s spelling of it in the final round.

This post originally appeared last year.

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