CLOSE
Original image
TinHouse.com

7 Bizarre Ways Kids Amused Themselves Before Video Games

Original image
TinHouse.com

This generation is soft, and uninspired. In the old days, all a kid needed to have a good time was imagination, some throwing knives, and a couple of belts tied round his neck. Here are seven examples of forgotten fun.

1. The Trussed Fowl

If you think the main object of playing “Trussed Fowl” would be to escape what has been done to you, you are cowardly and lack imagination. A 1907 book of party games describes the precise method of bondage the game required: “Trussing consists of firmly tying the wrists and ankles, bringing the elbows down below the knees, and slipping a stick under along one elbow, under both knees and over the other elbow." (You can see it illustrated above.) Once properly subjugated, two children are placed foot to foot. The ostensible object of the game is to flip the other child over, using only your toes. The real object of the game is to watch children writhe on the ground. Maybe now you’ll keep your baseball out of my yard, Jimmy.  

2. Catch and Pull

Google Books

In the olden days, kids didn't use video games to get out aggression; it had to come out more organically. Catch and Pull is a game recommended in a 1921 publication as excellent physical exercise for the school gymnasium. Two teams stand on either side of a line. Then, commence Battle Royale. The goal is to grab any body part belonging to an opposite player and use it to drag him to your side of the line, and so on, until there is only one person remaining on the opposing side. The book doesn’t specify what happens to the remaining player, but I hope he would have at least earned the right to choose his own method of execution.

3. Mumbly Peg

Library of Congress

Why don’t kids throw knives at each other anymore? It built character, and prepared you for whatever war you were going to be drafted into. Mumbly Peg was popular among boys in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Each boy would, in turn, perform a series of complicated knife throws—left handed, round the back, launched from behind his ear—escalating in difficulty. The knife had to stick in the ground at the end of each throw. In some versions, winners were picked on how close the knife landed to their own foot. You won automatically if it stuck in your foot (seriously). The first boy to fail to stick a throw would have to get the mumble peg, a piece of wood driven into the ground by the winner, using the knife as a hammer. And he could only use his teeth. Thus, the mumbly part of Mumbly Peg.

4. Kick the Can

The Victory Report

You’ve likely heard of this game, and perhaps, like me, envisioned some sort of depressing urban soccer where tattered children, after licking every last bit of bean juice from the inside of a can, had to use it in place of a ball. In reality, the rules of this game were closer to hide and seek, except with an added element of hopeless futility. The children all hid, except for “It.” It had to track down the hidden kids (who were allowed to move at will) and tag (or in some versions just sight) them. The captured kids went to prison. But none of that really mattered, because at any time a player who was still free could run up and “kick the can,” shouting, “All Ye, All Ye, Out and Free!” (It’s not “olly olly oxen free.” That’s just silly.) Then all the prisoners scrambled and re-hid while It had to go retrieve and replace the can, starting the game all over. People who remember playing this game as child say it usually ended when It became bitter and dehydrated and went home.

5. Progression

Google Books

Progression is a throwback to when birthday parties were more about structured fun and less about parents holding their heads in their hands while children ran screaming around them at the Chuck E Cheese. The players are lined up, and each one must “progress” to a goal point in front of them. The only rule is, you cannot move in any of the same ways the people before you moved. If you’re at the end of a long line of players, you may find yourself furiously slapping your own butt while hopping across the grass on one foot. These games were likely meant to be more fun for the spectators than the participants.

Note that Progression is one of the few physical games where girls were considered viable participants. Girls had their own games, usually involving hand-holding, string, and daisy chains.  Letting them get used to fresh air and be in command of their own bodies would have just been cruel.

6. Dog Fight

Google Books

My theory is that people got so tired of having to be so dignified in the old days, with all their pocket watches and World Wars, that they just needed an outlet. How else to explain two people on all fours, strapping belts around their necks and yanking at each other while spectators literally bark encouragement at them? You’d have to pay good money to get someone to do that for you nowadays.

7. Hot Cockles

Google Books

Now, stepping back further in time, we have Hot Cockles. It sounds uncomfortable, and it is. This Victorian game returns to a common theme in bygone amusements: People sitting around abusing each other for fun. Basically, you laid your head in someone’s lap while all the other party-goers took turns hitting you from behind. The game was to guess who was beating on you. The prize was to be allowed to leave.  

Original image
Habibou Kouyate, Stringer, Getty Images
arrow
science
Play a Game to Help Scientists Defeat a Cancer-Causing Toxin
Original image
Habibou Kouyate, Stringer, Getty Images

If you're used to fighting virtual zombies or flying spaceships on your computer, a new series of games available on Foldit may sound a little unconventional. The object of the Aflatoxin Challenge is to rearrange protein structures and create new enzymes. But its impact on the real world could make it the most important game you've ever played: The scientists behind it hope it will lead to a new way to fight one of the most ruthless causes of liver cancer.

As Fast Company reports, the citizen science project is a collaboration between Mars, Inc. and U.C. Davis, the University of Washington, the Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, and Thermo Fisher Scientific. The team's online puzzles, which debuted on Foldit earlier this month, invite the public to create a new enzyme capable of finding and destroying carcinogens known as aflatoxins.

Aflatoxins form when certain fungi grow on crops like corn, nuts, and grains. Developing countries often don't have the resources to detect it in food, leaving around 4.5 billion people vulnerable to it. When people do eat food with high aflatoxin levels unknowingly, they can contract liver cancer. Roughly a quarter of all liver cancer cases around the world can be traced back to aflatoxin exposure.

The toxin's connection to agriculture is why the food giant Mars is so interested in fighting it. By working on a way to stop aflatoxins on a molecular level, the company could prevent its spread more efficiently than they would with less direct methods like planting drought-resistant crops or removing mold by hand.

The easiest way for scientists to eradicate an aflatoxin before it causes real harm is by making an enzyme that does the work for them. With the Aflatoxin Challenge, the hope is that by manipulating protein structures, online players will come up with an enzyme that attacks aflatoxins at a susceptible portion of their molecular structure called a lactone ring. Destroying the lactone ring makes aflatoxin much less toxic and essentially safe to eat.

The University of Washington launched Foldit in 2008. Since then, the online puzzle platform has been used to study a wide range of diseases including AIDS and Chikungunya. Everyone is welcome to contribute to the Foldit's new aflatoxin project for the next several weeks or so, after which scientists will synthesize genes based on the most impressive results to be used in future studies.

[h/t Fast Company]

Original image
Nervous System
arrow
Art
Every Laser-Cut 'Geode' Jigsaw Puzzle is One of a Kind
Original image
Nervous System

If you haven’t picked up a boxed jigsaw puzzle in a while, trust that they’ve undergone a serious transformation since your childhood. One of the most innovative companies in the category is Nervous System, a self-described “generative design studio” that composes computer programs to create puzzles based on patterns found in nature.

Their latest project, Geode, is a line of jigsaw puzzles modeled after agate stone. Like the rest of Nervous System’s puzzle inventory, it has an unusual and dynamic design; it's meant to mimic the band pattern of actual agate created by trapped gas in volcanic stone.

Several geode puzzles are shown
Nervous System

According to Nervous System’s site: “To create the organic shape of the pieces, we designed a system based the simulation of dendritic solidification, a crystal growth process similar to the formation of snowflakes that occurs in supercooled solutions of certain metallic alloys. By varying the parameter space, the system can produce a variety of cut styles. Each puzzle produced features its own unique landscape of interlocking shapes. No two are alike.”

Though lovely to look at, the puzzles utilize Nervous System's "Maze" piece-cutting method, which results in irregular and distorted shapes that may prove "fiendishly difficult" for some.

The 8.5-inch puzzles are made from plywood and feature 180 pieces. You can grab one for $60 at Nervous System’s online shop.

[h/t MyModernMet]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios