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Bates Motel Recap: Episode 10, "Midnight"

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Ready for our last taste of Norman Bates for at least nine months? I'm not. I might have to switch fictional serial killers to fill the void. I hear Hannibal is interesting. But let's get to it.

For what feels like the umpteenth time, Norma is rushing into the police station with a “matter of life and death.” She’s there to rat out Abernathy, who, you’ll remember from last episode, demanded at gunpoint that she meet him at midnight with $150,000 she says she doesn’t have. She explains the whole situation to Romero, who doesn’t react whatsoever. Lady Gaga, eat your heart out—no one can beat this poker face.

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“Alright. I’ll take care of it,” is all he says.

Norma isn’t convinced. She wants to know his plan, but he doesn’t think that’s necessary.
“No harm is going to come to you or your sons. You have my word.”

“That’s comforting,” she says, sarcastically.

“Yep,” he deadpans, then looks pointedly at the door. Miraculously, Norma takes the hint.

Norman Does a Favor; Norma Asks for One

Emma is staring up at the winter formal sign strung across a hallway at school.

“You look kind of pathetic,” Norman tells her, and it’s true. But the joke’s on us, because she was totally just thinking about how glad she is that she doesn’t have to get dressed up and go.

“Do you want me to go with you?” Norman asks. “I don’t mind.” Ah, every girl’s dream dance invitation. Emma gives him a withering look, which is when he realizes perhaps he could have been slightly more suave. “I’d like to,” he amends.

“You’re just asking me because I’m your friend and you feel sorry for me,” she accuses.

“Well, yeah,” Norman kind of grins.

Emma agrees to go anyway, and this whole exchange is rather adorable. Nemma!!

I’m starting to think that Dylan could give Walt, Jr. from Breaking Bad a run for his money on his love of breakfast foods. I swear, if he’s in the house, he’s eating cereal or Norma is trying to bribe him with a plate of something breakfasty. It’s French Toast this morning, and what she wants in return is NBD ... just a gun.

When he refuses, she explains that she’s not convinced that Romero is actually going to do much to protect any of them. She thinks he might even be just as corrupt as everyone else in town. Nonetheless, Dylan doesn’t think Norma needs to be armed and dangerous.

“You and a gun is a bad idea,” he tells her. Understatement of the century.

Meanwhile, Romero just might be proving Norma right. He’s pulling a duffel bag out of a trunk in a garage, and it’s filled with an obscene amount of cash.

A Series of Awkward Conversations

Norma’s taking some of her many flowered shirts to “In a Wink” drycleaners. She drops one on the sidewalk and kind of stumbles into a guy as she’s picking it up.

“Oops! Sorry!”

“Yeah, I guess,” the guy mutters. Norma is tired of this town not living up to the picture-perfect Norman Rockwell scene she had painted in her mind, and this man blowing off her perfectly adequate apology strikes a nerve.

“Screw off shithead,” she screams down the street at him.

Perhaps recognizing some anger issues, she makes her next morning errand a visit to the therapist for some advice on how to handle stress. When Dr. Kurata presses her to discuss what kind of stress she’s under, she gets a little cagey.

“Just... stuff... like... normal... life stuff...”

He asks if it’s Norman stress, but she says that’s Norman’s a good boy.

“He’s not quite a boy, though, is he?” Kurata interrupts.

“I guess he is getting bigger, yeah,” Norma concedes. To me, this shows that she still thinks of him as a young child—you don’t really say that your 17-year-old is “getting bigger,” do you?

“When you were a little girl, is this what you thought parenting would be like?” Kurata asks.

Norma doesn’t really remember.

“Do you remember anything about being little?”

Norma looks thoughtful. “My dad was very kind. The kind of guy who would smile at you all the time no matter what. You would feel like he would just take care of everything.”

Her mom? Well, her mom worked in a bakery and always smelled like cookies.

He asks if she had any siblings.

“No. I am an only child,” she says quickly, and then makes a face. “Oh, I don’t feel well. Oh, it’s my stomach. I’m gonna have to reschedule.”

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At school, Miss Watson having a heated conversation on the phone. “Why do you keep calling me? Stop bothering me,” she says, voice shaking. “I said leave me alone. Eric, don’t call me again.”

Norman has walked in on the end of this conversation and asks Miss Watson if everything is okay.

“Norman, did you hear anything that I was saying?” She seems panicked. I feel like a more normal reaction would be to shrug it off, say that she was just having a fight with her boyfriend. Why all the drama, Miss Watson?

Norman denies hearing anything specific and says that he was just there to reiterate that he definitely doesn’t want to publish that story—not because of his mother, just because he doesn’t want to. Miss Watson understands. Norman’s short story is the least of her concern right now.

She asks him again to ignore what he just heard her saying on the phone; Norman promises.

Then Miss Watson steps up close—uncomfortably close—and cups one of his cheeks (face cheeks) with her hand.

“I guess this means we have a secret now, huh? You’ll keep it for me, won’t you?” It sounds oddly seductive, which is emphasized by the intimate hug they share afterward. She strokes the back of his neck with her hand, and he leans into her neck a bit, as if she smells good. Nothing about this is cool.

A bedraggled-looking woman with bruises and scratches on her face gets out of a old car in front of a rundown house. She doesn’t exactly smile at the person waiting there for her.

“Alex,” she greets Sheriff Romero. “I haven’t seen you since my brother’s service. Bit weird, nothing to bury but a hand.” So, this is Keith Summers’ sister.

Romero wants to know what happened to her face. She says she doesn’t recall. He decides to lay it all out for her: he knows that she did her brother’s bookkeeping for the sex slave business and he knows about the missing money. “Did Jake Abernathy do this to you?” he asks.

She’s not familiar with this particular name, but when Romero says he’s referring to the third partner of the sex slave business, a lightbulb goes on.

“You mean Joe Fioretti?” she starts to describe him and it turns out they’re one and the same. She reports that he claimed to be running the same type of business up and down the coast.

Romero nods, then turns to leave.

“What happens now? To me?” she asks.

“Nothing, if you keep your mouth shut.” Romero says. “Take care of yourself, Maggie.” Warm and fuzzy guy, isn’t he?

A Shot in the Dark

Emma’s walking into the motel as Norma is calling to nag the police station about patrolling the motel more often. When she hangs up, Emma apologizes for being late—she just stopped to buy a dress she saw in a vintage store (obviously) for the dance tonight.

“You’re going to a dance?” Norma asks. She’s surprised to learn that Norman has agreed to take Emma, but covers quickly. “I just hadn’t heard anything about it.”

Emma produces a lacy wine-colored number and asks Norma to hold it up so she can see what it looks like with heels. As Norma holds it against herself, she pulls the skirt up to examine a spot on the fabric. It exposes the long scar on her leg, which she catches Emma staring at.

“That’s just an accident from childhood,” Norma fumbles. “I spilled some hot chocolate on my leg.”

She pulls her coat on and heads outside, where Dylan is pulling up in his truck. He hops out and hands her a paper bag, the White Pine Bay preferred method of exchanging large wads of cash and firearms. Looks like he changed his mind about the gun.
“Don’t make me regret this,” he warns, then takes her out to teach her how to shoot with the requisite beer bottles lined up on a fence.

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She shoots before Dylan tells her to, which they argue about for a moment. Then she has enough sense to wonder where this gun came from.

“So what kind of job do you have that you’re carrying a gun?”

“I guard stuff,” he says, looking totally guilty.

“What kind of stuff?”

“Weed. Pot fields.”

“I don’t like that!” she whines.

He accuses her of passing judgment. “I’m 22 years old. I’m adult.”

She fires the gun again, which pisses him off even more. Finally, Dylan convinces Norma to settle down and get in the right stance and take a good aim instead of just firing willy nilly like she has been.

“I want you to squeeze the trigger,” he instructs her. “Don’t yank on it. Just gently squeeze it, okay, mom?”

She does, and nails the bottle. After a little celebratory dance, Norma looks at Dylan.

“You called me mom. You haven’t done that in like, I don’t know how long.”

Dylan looks a little uncomfortable.

“Yeah, well you have a loaded gun in your hand, Norma.”

“I’m so scared,” she admits. Dylan tells her that she just has to trust Romero—word on the street is that he’s the man in this town. She nods, then starts practicing her shots again.

Bradley and Dylan, Sitting in a Tree

Norma’s cleaning at the motel when Maggie Summers wanders up and identifies herself.

She’s not here to make trouble, though—she just wants to warn Norma that this guy going by “Jake Abernathy” is no joke. “If you have that money, give it up. I know this guy. He. Will. Kill you,” she says.

Up the hill at the Bates residence, Bradley is at the door. She forces a smile when Norman opens up, then asks if Dylan is home. Norman is clearly a little perturbed by this, but invites her in anyway. Dylan is just bringing a box of her dad’s office stuff downstairs.
“Thank you for doing this,” she says, and the two of them smolder at each other.

Norman excuses himself, shoving past Dylan on his way out.

They make small talk about how nice it is that she has her dad’s stuff back now. Dylan also managed to find that pocketwatch she had been looking for. She thanks him again.

“Well, this is it,” she says. “I won’t bug you anymore.”

Dylan laughs. “You can bug me. It’s fine. You can bug me anytime.”

Norman is listening from the other room, of course, and he has total rageface.

Norma is checking out her gun. She has it pointed at her own face and is messing with the hammer when she seems to realize what she’s doing. She flips it away from her face, which is just as well, because she might have accidentally shot something off when Norman yells this two seconds later:

“Motheerrrr! I need some black socks!” This is not just your typical teenage whine. This is Norman, totally enraged that the appropriate formalwear accessories are not within arm’s reach. Norma wonders if he checked his sock drawer.

“Oh, it never occurred to me to look in my drawer.” He laughs, but it’s biting, mocking. “Well what am I supposed to do? I can’t go to this stupid dance wearing white socks with a suit!”

“It’s not my fault you decided to go last minute to a dance! What am I supposed to do, darn some socks?” Norma says.

“I’ve got some black socks he can use,” Dylan says, stopping in the doorway.

Even with the gift of formal socks, the air between the brothers is tense. Dylan knows what the deal is and explains that he was only helping Bradley retrieve her dad’s stuff.

“I’m not going out with her,” he promises.

“You want to. Who wouldn’t?” Norman does that mocking laugh again.

"This conversation is stupid,” Dylan says.

“All conversations are stupid. Just ‘blah blah blah,’ like rats trying to find their way out through a maze. You think it has some purpose or meaning but it doesn’t.”

“OK, now you’re creeping me out,” Dylan replies.

Norman tells him to ask Bradley out if he really wants to. “I should,” Dylan agrees.

“Yes, you should!” Norman insists, brightly. “I’m fine. I’m completely, 100 percent over her.”

Norma’s Secret

Downstairs, Norman and Norma wait for Emma together. Norma asks how late the dance will go, and Norman informs her that it’s over at midnight. Norma totally crumbles at the mere mention of the witching hour.

In case Abernathy kills her—she doesn’t say this, but it’s what she means—Norma wants to tell Norman something she’s never told anybody: She grew up in Akron, Ohio. And there’s a lot more truth where that came from. “My brother used to make me have sex with him,” she tells her son. “I was like 13. And it went on until he moved out.” She barely has the words out of her mouth before she regrets telling him, but she plows ahead anyway.

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Her dad was insane, incredibly violent—a far cry from that kindly man she told the therapist about. Because she knew her father would literally kill her brother if she told, Norma kept her mouth shut. Then her dad got home from work early one day while her brother was violating her. Norma jumped up so fast that the hot iron fell off the ironing board and hit her leg.

Flashback to the hissing iron that featured so prominently on the scene of Norman’s dad’s death.

Norman apologizes and hugs her. Norma cries.

“Anyway. It doesn’t really matter, right? It was a long time ago. It’s just that I wanted someone to know this about me in case—in case, um. I don’t know why. I don’t know why.”

Just then, Emma arrives to pick up Norman.

“Wow. You look great,” he tells her, but he’s barely even paying attention. I mean, that was quite the bombshell to drop right before he’s supposed to have some good old-fashioned teenage fun at a dance.

“You two have fun,” Norma gushes, and sends the young not-couple on their way. They’re just out the door when Abernathy calls to remind her about their appointment.

The Winter Dance from Hell

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“Everybody’s got a secret to hide. Everyone is slipping backwards,” the Chromatics sing overhead as Norman and Emma enter the dance. Hmm.
This dance looks amazing, by the way. My high school dances never looked this magical. Emma and Norman don’t realize how lucky they are to be at a high school event where the decor is more than crepe paper and flimsy cardboard cutouts from Oriental Trading, though, because neither one of them have ever been to a dance.
“It’s not too late to leave,” Norman tries, but then spots Bradley talking to her boyfriend. She sees him staring at her. It’s awkward, much like all of their post-sex encounters.

Emma says she needs a drink.

Later, Nemma are gazing at each other as they dance to “Lady in Red.” Glad to see teens are still awkwardly slow dancing to Chris de Burgh.

Oh, and let me amend that previous statement: Emma is intently gazing at Norman. Norman’s eyes keep wandering over to Bradley.
“You still like her, don’t you?” Emma asks.

“That’s ridiculous,” Norman responds.

“No. You know what’s ridiculous? Me, thinking you’d take me to the dance and see me all dressed up and realize that you have feelings for me, Norman Bates, because you do, you’re just too stupid to know it.” She leaves and tells Norman he can find his own ride home.

Then Bradley’s boyfriend asks to speak to Norman outside, where he punches him, sending Norman spinning into the cinderblock wall. His face gets the brunt of it.

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Since the dance has been hideous, Norman starts walking home, even though it’s pouring down rain. Miss Watson, of all people, pulls up next to him and offers him a ride.

“What happened to your eye?” she asks.

“I got in a fight. Actually, I got punched. The other guy was fine,” Norman kind of smiles.

“Why don’t you come to my place and I’ll clean up your eye and I can drive you home.”

Danger, Will Robinson. No. No. No.

Midnight

Norma has clearly watched a lot of heist movies, because she’s at the docks, clad all in black with a scarf over her hair, carrying a nondescript bag. She ducks out of sight to see if Romero will make good on his promise to protect her, and sure enough, he pulls up a few seconds later. He’s got the duffel bag full of money from earlier and drops it on the dock just as Abernathy pulls up.

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“Who are you?” Abernathy/Fioretti says, sizing up the sheriff.

The proper introductions are made.

“What happened to the cute but nutty lady who runs the motel?” Abernathy wants to know. “You kill her?”

Romero says it’s been handled but Abernathy doesn’t really care. He just wants to know if that bag on the dock is for him.
Romero nods. “You gonna run a business in my town, I should know about it.”

“Was. Running a business. Past tense.”

“Maybe that doesn’t have to be the case. You got the wrong partners.”

“Well, it wasn’t like I could put an ad out on Craigslist.”

Romero says that if “Joe” wants to keep his business in White Pine Bay, he has to go through the sheriff. And the sheriff wants a 50 percent cut.

“I put a cell number for you on a card. It’s in the bag.”

As he bends down to grab the bag, Romero shoots him four times. Abernathy falls into the water.

“Not in my town,” the sheriff mutters, then throws the bag into the water too.

“You can go home now Norma,” he says. “When I say trust me, trust me,” he says.

Hot for Teacher

At Miss Watson’s. She’s playing nurse to Norman’s injured eye while wearing a low-cut red dress. Coincidence that “Lady in Red” was just playing at the school dance? Methinks not.

“You probably shouldn’t tell anyone that you came here,” she says.

“Don’t worry,” Norman responds.

Miss Watson says she’ll drive him home right after she changes. She puts her hand on his cheek as she gets up to walk to her bedroom.

She leaves the door to her bedroom open. There’s a mirror conveniently placed so that he can see her undressing, and Oh God, imaginary Norma is suddenly sitting in the living room with Norman.

“What kind of a grown woman invites a teenage boy into her house and changes her clothes where he can see her?” she snaps.

“That’s not what she’s doing,” Norman says.

“Of course it is. She’s trying to seduce you.”

“That’s not true.”

“Then why didn’t she close the door? Because she knows you’re watching.”

“She does not.”

“Of course she does. She wants you to see her body.”

“Stop!”

“Norman. You know what you have to do.”

The next thing we see is Norman running down the road in the rain. He’s running into the Bates Motel parking lot and is very nearly struck by Norma’s car.

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They hug; she wants to know what happened to his face.

“Emma got upset and had to leave and Miss Watson was gonna give me a ride and the next thing I remember I was just running on the road alone, just trying to get home.”

“It’s okay, Norman,” she says, and starts to cry. “Everything is good, Norman, finally. Everything is good. Let’s go build a fire. How does that sound?”

They walk inside. Pretty music. Shot of the Bates Motel sign.

All tied up in a pretty bow right?

A happy ending heading into the sophomore season? Norman must have run home from his teacher’s house without punishing her for leaving that door open while she changed clothes? Yeah, you know better than that. Our parting shot for the season is Miss Watson sprawled across her bedroom floor, bleeding all over her pretty lingerie from a gaping wound in her throat.

A couple of notes:

Alex Romero is the name of a baseball player who tested positive for doping last year. It probably doesn’t have anything to do with this character’s name, but you never know.

Miss Watson was wearing a necklace with the initial “B” on it. Might we have our mysterious “All my love, B” from Bradley’s dad’s letters?

See you in 2014, Motel guests!

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17 Painless Facts About M*A*S*H
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Fox Home Video

In 1968, surgeon H. Richard Hornberger—using the nom de plume of Richard Hooker—collaborated with writer W.C. Heinz to create the book MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, based on his experiences with the 8055th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital during the Korean War. Two years later, Robert Altman used the book as the basis for a movie about the fictional 4077th unit (he cut the number 8055 in half.) Two years after that—on this day 45 years ago—M*A*S*H came to life again in the form of an 11-season television series that culminated in the most-watched series finale in television history. Here are some facts about the show that won't get you a Section 8.

1. ALAN ALDA AND JAMIE FARR SERVED IN THE U.S. ARMY.

Alda (Hawkeye Pierce) was in the Army Reserve for six months in Korea. Farr enlisted, and was stationed in Japan when Red Skelton requested his services on his USO Tour through Korea. Wayne Rogers (Trapper John McIntyre) joined the U.S. Navy for a time as a ship navigator. Mike Farrell (B.J. Hunnicut) served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

2. MCLEAN STEVENSON AUDITIONED FOR HAWKEYE, AND COMEDIAN ROBERT KLEIN TURNED DOWN THE ROLE OF TRAPPER JOHN.

Stevenson was convinced to take the role of Lt. Colonel Henry Blake instead. As for Klein, he denied a claim that he lived to regret the decision.

3. LARRY GELBART WROTE THE PILOT IN TWO DAYS FOR $25,000.

The veteran screenwriter had been living in London after growing tired of Hollywood, but he couldn’t pass up the opportunity to try to adapt Robert Altman’s movie for television audiences.

4. KLINGER WAS ONLY SUPPOSED TO BE IN ONE EPISODE.

The cast of MASH
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment

He was also supposed to be gay. Jamie Farr’s character was changed to a heterosexual who cross-dressed to try to get himself kicked out of Korea. Allegedly, the Klinger character was influenced by comedian Lenny Bruce’s claim that he got discharged from the Navy for claiming to have “homosexual tendencies.”

5. ONLY THE NETWORK WANTED THE LAUGH TRACK.

Gelbart and executive producer Gene Reynolds were against the canned laughter; unfortunately CBS knew of no other way to present a 30-minute “comedy.” Gelbart and Reynolds did manage to get the network to agree to take out the laughing during the scenes in the operating room, and as the seasons progressed, the track got quieter and quieter. In the U.K., the BBC omitted the laugh track entirely.

6. CBS DIDN’T WANT ONE "UNPATRIOTIC" EPISODE.

An episode where soldiers stand outside in the freezing cold so that they can make themselves sick enough to be sent home was rejected by CBS. That soldier tactic was apparently actually used during the Korean War.

7. THE WRITERS CAME UP WITH AN INGENIOUS WAY OF DEALING WITH SCRIPT COMPLAINTS.

After growing tired of having to listen to cast members’ notes about their scripts, M*A*S*H writer Ken Levine and his fellow scribes changed their script on two occasions so that the actors were forced to pretend it was parka weather on 90- to 100-degree days on their Malibu ranch set. They took the hint and the “ticky tack” notes stopped.

8. WAYNE ROGERS WAS ABLE TO LEAVE THE SHOW BECAUSE HE NEVER SIGNED A CONTRACT.

Rogers was threatened with a breach of contract lawsuit. The problem was that he had never signed a deal, objecting to the standard contract given to TV actors when he had started playing Trapper John, particularly the “morals clause,” which he considered antiquated. Rogers said that aside from missing the cast—and his friendship with Alda in particular—he had no regrets about leaving the show after season three.

9. ALDA WAS THE ONLY ACTOR WHO WAS AWARE OF HENRY BLAKE’S FATE UNTIL MOMENTS BEFORE SHOOTING THE FINAL SCENE IN “ABYSSINIA, HENRY.”

Alan Alda in MASH
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment

Gelbart and Reynolds used the opportunity for McLean Stevenson wanting to leave after the third season to “make a point” about the “wastefulness” of war, and decided to kill off Henry Blake. After distributing the script without the last page and shooting all of the scenes written therein, Gelbart asked the cast to wait a few minutes before the start of the end-of-season wrap party and gave them each one copy of the final page, where Radar enters the O.R. and announces that Henry didn’t make it.

Larry Linville (Frank Burns) immediately remarked that it was “f***ing brilliant.” Gary Burghoff (Radar) turned to Stevenson and called him a son of a bitch, because he was going to get an acting Emmy for the episode. (He didn’t.) They then shot the scene in two takes. Gelbart and Reynolds claimed they received over 1000 letters from people upset over the ending. Reynolds also claimed that CBS was so unhappy with the decision that in at least one repeat airing, they cut out the final scene.

10. THE WRITERS RAN OUT OF NAMES.

During season six, there's an episode that features four Marine patients named after the 1977 California Angels infield. Throughout season seven, the patients were named after the 1978 Los Angeles Dodgers. Ken Levine didn’t just use baseball player's names though; in “Goodbye Radar,” Radar’s new girlfriend was named after one of Levine’s former lady friends, Patty Haven.

11. THE SERIES LASTED MUCH LONGER THAN THE ACTUAL KOREAN WAR.

The series spent 11 years telling the story of Army doctors and nurses dealing with a three year, one month, and two day war.

12. ALDA CO-WROTE 13 AND DIRECTED 31 EPISODES OF THE SERIES.

That 31 count includes the series finale. Alda was the first person to ever win an Emmy for acting, directing, and writing on the same program.

13. A METRIC TON OF FUTURE STARS MADE GUEST APPEARANCES.

Ron Howard played an underage Marine. Leslie Nielsen played a Colonel. Patrick Swayze portrayed an injured soldier with leukemia. John Ritter, Laurence Fishburne, Pat Morita, Rita Wilson, George Wendt, Shelley Long, Ed Begley Jr., Blythe Danner, Teri Garr, and even Andrew Dice Clay also all visited the 4077th.

14. THE SERIES FINALE IS STILL THE MOST WATCHED EPISODE OF TELEVISION IN AMERICAN HISTORY.

Seventy-seven percent of the people watching television in the United States on the night of Monday, February 28, 1983 were watching the two-and-a-half-hour series finale, “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen.” That was 121.6 million people. A company only had to pay $30,000 to run a 30-second commercial when M*A*S*H got started in 1972. For the series finale, a 30-second spot cost $450,000.

15. THERE WERE THREE SPINOFFS.

Trapper John, M.D., aired from 1979 to 1986 and was about Trapper John McIntyre’s present-day tenure as chief of surgery back in San Francisco (it didn’t star Wayne Rogers.) AfterMASH featured Col. Potter (Harry Morgan), Father Mulcahy (William Christopher), and Klinger (Jamie Farr) working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri right after the events of M*A*S*H; it was cancelled in its second season as it was unable to compete with The A-Team. W*A*L*T*E*R followed the new adventures of Walter “Radar” O'Reilly (Burghoff again), who became a St. Louis cop after losing the family farm and his wife (not Patty Haven) and attempting suicide. The pilot wasn’t picked up, and only aired once, and only in the eastern and central time zones, on CBS on July 17, 1984.

16. RADAR’S TEDDY BEAR WAS SOLD AND RETURNED TO BURGHOFF.

Gary Burghoff as Radar in MASH
Fox Home Video

Burghoff said Radar’s teddy bear had been lost for 30 years until it suddenly turned up at an auction in 2005. A medical student bought it for $11,500, and promptly sold it back to Burghoff.

17. A CONSTRUCTION WORKER FOUND THE SHOW’S TIME CAPSULE ALMOST IMMEDIATELY.

In the series' penultimate episode, “As Time Goes By,” the characters bury a time capsule under the Fox Ranch. Two months later, the land was sold. Soon after, a construction worker found the capsule and got in contact with Alan Alda to ask what he should do with it. After he was told to keep it, Alda claimed the construction worker “didn’t seem very impressed.”

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18 Things You Might Not Know About Frasier
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The character of psychiatrist Frasier Crane was added to Cheers during the series’ third season as a temporary release for some of the Sam and Diane relationship tension. Dr. Crane was only supposed to be around for a few episodes, but thanks to a combination of good writing and Kelsey Grammer’s performance, Frasier became a series regular by Cheers's fifth season. He was so popular that he was eventually spun off into his own series, which premiered on September 16, 1993—and lasted an amazing 11 years. Here are some fun behind-the-scenes facts for all you Frasier fans.

1. THE ORIGINAL IDEA FOR THE SHOW HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH FRASIER.

Kelsey Grammer and the creative team behind Frasier (David Lee, David Angell, and Peter Casey) originally thought that any use of the Dr. Crane character would encourage unfair comparisons to Cheers, so their initial ideas involved Kelsey playing a paralyzed media mogul cared for by a street-smart nurse in a Manhattan penthouse. Paramount hated the idea and convinced all concerned that it would be unwise not to capitalize on the built-in Cheers audience.

2. THEY WANTED TO SET THE SHOW AS FAR AWAY FROM BOSTON AS POSSIBLE.

Once it was agreed that Grammer would continue as Dr. Crane, the creators still wanted to distance themselves from Boston and the whole "crossover syndrome." They knew that the network would insist on having former Cheers characters make guest appearances if the show was set anywhere in Massachusetts, so they moved Frasier across the country to Seattle. The gourmet coffee scene was just taking root in that area, which provided a central meeting place for the characters. The creators didn't want Frasier Crane to work in private practice, since that had already been done on The Bob Newhart Show. Grammer's resonant voice seemed natural for radio, so the concept of a call-in psychiatry show seemed natural.

3. LISA KUDROW COULD HAVE PLAYED ROZ ...

Future Friends star Lisa Kudrow originally won the role of Frasier’s producer, Roz Doyle. But during the third day of rehearsals prior to filming the pilot, the producers realized that while Kudrow was certainly funny enough, she just wasn’t forceful enough to match Grammer when he went all out. They needed a female “alpha dog” to play the part, so Kudrow was out and second choice Peri Gilpin was in. The character was named after Roz Doyle, one of the producers of Wings who died of breast cancer in 1991 at age 49.

4. ... AND ROSIE PEREZ WAS ALMOST DAPHNE.

Rosie Perez was this close to being psychic home health care worker Daphne. Grammer was pushing for the character to be a Latina, while the producers had their eye on Jane Leeves. Grammer’s main objection to the British Leeves was that the show might too closely resemble Nanny and the Professor, a warm and fuzzy family sitcom of the 1970s that starred Juliet Mills as an English nanny with psychic abilities. Grammer agreed to Leeves as the choice when his initial table reading with the actress went exceptionally well.

5. KELSEY GRAMMER SANG THE SHOW'S THEME SONG.

Composer Bruce Miller was given the challenging assignment of writing a theme song for the series that didn’t specifically mention psychiatry, radio, or the name “Frasier.” Lyricist Darryl Phinnesse came up with the cryptic phrase “tossed salad and scrambled eggs” as a metaphor for the “mixed up” patients that Dr. Crane saw regularly. Miller originally envisioned Mel Tormé singing the theme over the closing credits, but the producers preferred to employ Grammer’s golden throat.

6. THE SHOW'S DESIGNERS SPENT MAJOR MONEY FURNISHING FRASIER'S APARTMENT.

“So what do you think of what I’ve done with the place?” Frasier asked his father, Martin, in the pilot episode. “You know, every item here was carefully selected. The lamp by Corbu, this chair by Eames, and this couch is an exact replica of the one Coco Chanel had in her Paris atelier.” The show’s set designers spent almost half a million dollars to give Frasier’s apartment its “eclectic” look. The Coco Chanel replica sofa was covered with 24 yards of Italian suede for an estimated cost of about $15,000. The Eames chair was rented, but the Pastoe curved sideboard was purchased for $3,200 and the Wassily chair had a $1,395 price tag. Martin’s eyesore of a recliner was also on the pricey side, since the prop department couldn’t find an appropriately ugly chair at any second-hand store. The chair was eventually covered with tape and covered with fabric purchased from an exclusive shop that specialized in deliberately tacky 1970s-era textiles.

7. THE FIRST CUT OF THE PILOT WAS SIX MINUTES TOO LONG.

After seven passes, it still came in sixty seconds more than it should and the creative team decided they couldn’t cut any more. NBC agreed and said they would find the extra time—not by cutting a commercial, but by taking 15 seconds from the other 4 shows on that night.

8. JANE LEEVES WORKED WITH AN ACCENT COACH.

Leeves grew up just north of London, England, but since her character was from Manchester she used an affected Mancunian accent (which received a lot of criticism from fans when Frasier aired in the U.K.). Leeves worked with a voice coach to ensure that her accent would be understood by American viewers. John Mahoney, on the other hand, grew up in Manchester but emigrated to the U.S. when he was 19 years old. He concentrated on losing his accent shortly after settling in Illinois so that he would “blend in.”

9. THE CAST MEMBER WHO RECEIVED THE MOST FAN MAIL ISN'T THE ONE YOU MIGHT EXPECT.

When Frasier first started topping the Nielsen ratings every week, which cast member received the most fan mail? Eddie the dog. Leeves once wryly observed that when Entertainment Weekly used Frasier as a lead story in 1993, Eddie was the only cast member to appear on the cover. Eddie was portrayed by a Jack Russell Terrier named Moose, who'd originally been adopted by a family that wasn't aware of the breed's rambunctious nature. Moose had relentless energy—he dug holes in the back yard, chased anything in his path, chewed furniture and even climbed trees to escape his enclosure. His family gave him up to a rescue organization, which is where professional trainer Mathilde de Cagny discovered him. She decided he would be a good working dog because of his boundless energy and desire to always be doing something. Moose turned out to be an apt pupil, and learned to follow commands immediately. During the doggie auditions for the show, the producers were looking for a pooch that could stare endlessly at Kelsey Grammer (a running joke on the series), and Moose performed flawlessly, staring at Mathilde's outstretched index finger offstage until he was "released."

10. WHEN HE RETIRED, MOOSE WAS REPLACED BY HIS SON.

Moose retired at the age of 10 (after the end of Season 7) and his son Enzo took over the role of Eddie. Moose had been bred with the idea of achieving a look-alike replacement when it became obvious that Frasier would have a long run. Enzo had two siblings, a sister named Miko who was too small to play Eddie, and Moosie, who had noticeably different markings. Peri Gilpin, who played Roz, fell in love with Moosie and adopted him.

11. THE FRASIER WRITERS SOMETIMES WORKED SUBTLE HOMAGES TO CHEERS INTO THE SCRIPTS.

One famous example was the recreation of a scene where Sam and Diane were embroiled in a vicious argument that almost ended up in fisticuffs but instead resulted in a passionate embrace. Of course, when Frasier used the same tactic during a shouting match with financial analyst Julia Wilcox, he ended up being accused of sexual harassment.

12. MOST OF THE CHEERS CAST MADE APPEARANCES ON THE SHOW.

Most of the main Boston tavern regulars made appearances on Frasier. Lilith, logically, visited the most since she was Frasier’s ex and Frederick’s mom. Sam, Diane, and Woody all found themselves in Seattle for varying reasons, and a business trip to Boston in Season 9 enabled the Crane family to see the rest of the Cheers gang in one fell swoop. Noticeably absent, however, was Rebecca Howe, played by Kirstie Alley. Alley had contacted co-creator David Lee when Frasier was in the planning stages and informed him that as a Scientologist she did not believe in psychiatry and as a result would not be able to make an appearance on the series. Lee responded simply, “I don’t recall asking.”

13. THE EPISODE WHERE NILES CO-HOSTED HIS BROTHER'S SHOW WAS RE-WRITTEN WHEN GRAMMER WENT TO REHAB.

On the evening of September 21, 1996, Kelsey Grammer flipped his Dodge Viper (a gift from NBC) not far from his driveway in Agoura Hills, California. He wasn’t severely injured, but the resulting DUI arrest spurred him to check in at the Betty Ford Clinic. Frasier was on hiatus for the following three weeks due to the Major League Baseball playoffs, and the episode 4.05 (“Head Games”) was quickly rewritten to feature Niles hosting his brother’s radio program while Frasier was away at a convention. Grammer filmed his bit for the intro at a later date and it was tacked on to the show before broadcast.

14. THE PRODUCERS CREATED NILES SPECIFICALLY FOR DAVID HYDE PIERCE.

There wasn’t any particular plan in place to give Frasier a brother until the assistant casting director approached the creators with a photo of David Hyde Pierce in hand and asked, “Doesn’t he look like Kelsey did 10 years ago?” Startled by the physical resemblance, the creative team dug up some tapes of a short-lived Norman Lear-produced political sitcom called The Powers That Be, on which Pierce portrayed a shy, suicidal Congressman. A meeting was arranged with the actor and he was offered the newly created role of Niles Crane after a brief interview.

15. THE WRITERS EXPLAINED AWAY JANE LEEVES' PREGNANCY IN AN INTERESTING WAY.

Leeves was expecting in real life during Season 7, and her burgeoning baby bump was explained on the show as weight gain from Daphne’s sudden compulsive overeating as a method of dealing with her relationship with Niles. She was sent away to a spa for a few episodes and returned svelte (after daughter Isabella was born).

Roz’s pregnancy in Season 5, however, was strictly a plot device—an attempt by the writers to give the character a story arc of her own. Gilpin wasn’t with child, and she had a lot of explaining to do to friends and family members who thought she’d neglected to tell them about her impending motherhood. The entire Roz’s baby storyline was a misstep in retrospect, Gilpin and the producers agreed, and the infant remained behind the scenes for the most part because Grammer didn’t want the hassle of the tightly restricted work schedule of child actors.

16. EVEN THOUGH HE WAS RETIRED, MOOSE HAD ONE LAST CURTAIN CALL.

Moose was 14 when Frasier came to an end. The dog's fur had turned snow white and he was almost completely deaf, but his trainer carried him out onstage after the final episode taped so that the pooch could take his bows with the rest of the cast. David Hyde Pierce commented that it was one of the most moving moments of the evening, watching Moose recognize and react to the applause one last time.

17. KELSEY GRAMMER PLAYED FRASIER FOR A VERY, VERY LONG TIME ...

Counting the time he spent on Cheers, Kelsey Grammer played the character of Frasier Crane in prime time for 20 consecutive years, a record TV-land hadn’t seen since James Arness played Marshall Dillon on Gunsmoke for the same length of time. Grammer's publicist invited Arness to join Kelsey on The Today Show in 2004, but according to Grammer, Arness rejected the idea with a brief expletive that rhymes with “duck shoe.”

18. GRAMMER IS THE FIRST AMERICAN ACTOR TO BE NOMINATED FOR THE SAME CHARACTER ON THREE DIFFERENT SERIES.

Cheers and Frasier are obvious, but Frasier Crane also made an Emmy-nominated guest appearance on Wings.

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