CLOSE
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

The Cocktail Chart: Signature Drinks of Fictional Icons

Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

Want to drink like your favorite character? Now you can. Pop Chart Lab has created this handy chart brimming with recipes for the signature drinks of several unforgettable characters. Whether drinking to cope with a regrettable past (Dick Whitman, aka Don Draper, likes a classic Old Fashioned), bulk up (Rocky Balboa’s super-manly all-egg Protein Shake), or waste your flighty, privileged life away (lookin’ at you, Daisy), you’ll be in good hands with this exhaustive guide.


Click to enlarge

"Our love of libations is no big secret—we've charted the varieties of beer, the constitutions of cocktails, the manifold martinis, and the breakdown of alcohol at large," says the Pop Chart Lab team. "Our infographic-crazed poster company was actually borne from a love of books and literature. Or perhaps more accurately, our obsession with narrative—the way data can come together to tell a story, be it through prose, the moving image, or the snaking tendrils of a chart. So for this poster we plumbed the deaths of our book knowledge and cinephilia to come up with story-specific tipples. We realized quickly that so many of our favorite characters were actually immediately associated with alcoholic drinks: Bond's shaken-but-not-stirred martini; The Dude's White Russians; the many, many drinks of Fitzgerald and Hemingway's gilded age guzzlers. And our research further confirmed our suspicions: fictional characters, across all mediums, love to drink."

It should be noted that, while some of the listed drinks are all-inclusive (The Alaskan Polar Bear Heater contains a whopping 8 ingredients), some, like Hannibal Lector’s tall glass of Chianti, are all about the accompaniments. Most of the menu can be concocted using everyday liquor-store products, but good luck getting your hands on Krusty Brand cough syrup or, well, any of the ingredients required for the Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster.

One glaring omission seems to be the “Old Spanish,” a fictionally unappealing mixture of red wine, tonic water, and olives that recently made the trans-genre jump from the world of 30 Rock to Mad Men. Can you think of the signature drinks from any of your other favorite fictional characters that you would have liked to be included on this poster?

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
fun
Watch a Chain of Dominos Climb a Flight of Stairs
iStock
iStock

Dominos are made to fall down—it's what they do. But in the hands of 19-year-old professional domino artist Lily Hevesh, known as Hevesh5 on YouTube, the tiny plastic tiles can be arranged to fall up a flight of stairs in spectacular fashion.

The video spotted by Thrillist shows the chain reaction being set off at the top a staircase. The momentum travels to the bottom of the stairs and is then carried back up through a Rube Goldberg machine of balls, cups, dominos, and other toys spanning the steps. The contraption leads back up to the platform where it began, only to end with a basketball bouncing down the steps and toppling a wall of dominos below.

The domino art seems to flow effortlessly, but it took more than a few shots to get it right. The footage below shows the 32nd attempt at having all the elements come together in one, unbroken take. (You can catch the blooper at the end of an uncooperative basketball ruining a near-perfect run.)

Hevesh’s domino chains that don't appear to defy gravity are no less impressive. Check out this ambitious rainbow domino spiral that took her 25 hours to construct.

[h/t Thrillist]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
arrow
Art
A Secret Room Full of Michelangelo's Sketches Will Soon Open in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Parents all over the world have chastised their children for drawing on the walls. But when you're Michelangelo, you've got some leeway. According to The Local, the Medici Chapels, part of the Bargello museum in Florence, Italy, has announced that it plans to open a largely unseen room full of the artist's sketches to the public by 2020.

Roughly 40 years ago, curators of the chapels at the Basilica di San Lorenzo had a very Dan Brown moment when they discovered a trap door in a wardrobe leading to an underground room that appeared to have works from Michelangelo covering its walls. The tiny retreat is thought to be a place where the artist hid out in 1530 after upsetting the Medicis—his patrons—by joining a revolt against their control of Florence. While in self-imposed exile for several months, he apparently spent his time drawing on whatever surfaces were available.

A drawing by Michelangelo under the Medici Chapels in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Museum officials previously believed the room and the charcoal drawings were too fragile to risk visitors, but have since had a change of heart, leading to their plan to renovate the building and create new attractions. While not all of the work is thought to be attributable to the famed artist, there's enough of it in the subterranean chamber—including drawings of Jesus and even recreations of portions of the Sistine Chapel—to make a trip worthwhile.

[h/t The Local]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios