14 Fantastic Futurama Fan Art Creations


Last night, Futurama aired its final episode. Let's take a look back at a few of the coolest Futurama artworks ever created during the show's run.

1. The Horrors of Reality

As a cartoon character, Nibbler looks adorable and cuddly. But if he were real, that might not be the case. In fact, when artist Jared Krichevsky used 3D software to imagine what Futurama characters would look like in real life, the results ended up overwhelmingly creepy.

2. Real Life in Clay

Here’s another take on what the Planet Express crew would look like in the real world as envisioned by DeviantArt user artanis-one. While the Professor and Leela look similar, though more realistic, Dr. Zoidberg has changed from everyone’s favorite bumbling lobster man into an alien you’d expect to see on Star Trek.

3. Hayao Miyazaki's Futurama

Would Bender be a lot kinder if he was a product of Hayao Miyazaki's imagination instead of Matt Groening? Given Miyazaki's past creations like Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle and Ponyo, I’m willing to say yes—and Bouletcorp’s take on the robot as a Miyazaki character only further illustrates that point.

4. X-Rama

When Futurama characters are given mutant powers and start resembling X-Men, havoc is bound to ensue. DeviantArt user gottabecarl shows what the mash up between these two universes would probably look like.

5. The Futurelement

While I don’t really picture Fry pulling off any role Bruce Willis has ever played, the rest of the characters in this mash up work pretty well—especially Professor Farnsworth as Ruby Rod. All in all, this is a great take on The Fifth Element, courtesy of DeviantArt user RikudaSanin.

6. In 8-Bit

If Community could do an episode in 8-bit, then Futurama surely could as well—and it would probably look a lot like this video, created by YouTube user GrandmaBird.


Speaking of 8-bit, here’s the entire Planet Express building in New New York, along with many of the company’s employees, all in blocky, LEGO form.  The entire creation was done by Pepa Quin and she has plenty more pictures of the project on her Flickr stream.

8. Stained Glass

Are you a nerd looking to spruce up your home with something classy like a stained glass art piece? Then you’ll love Nerd Glass. They have two different Futurama designs, one featuring Bender and one with Dr. Zoidberg.

9. Roasting On An Open Bender

You may not want to bite Bender’s shiny metal butt, but biting into something cooked in said butt is an entirely different story. You can see the process Blogspot user halftroll used to make the Bender stove in this impressively lengthy blog post.

10. Fry and Leela: The Next Generation

For years fans waited to see if Fry would ever actually hook up with Leela. Now that he has, it’s time to start wondering if they’ll settle down and make a family. If they do, I hope they look like these adorable little brats drawn by Redditor doodiescoop.

11. Home Is Where The Fry IS

You know you’ve made it big when your face has been embroidered by a fan. Etsy seller It's a Stitch sells a variety of geeky embroidery projects, including this brilliant design featuring one of Fry’s most famous lines.

12. Put The Clamps On This Wall

Even street artists in Barcelona are fans of Futurama, or at least the show’s robotic gangsters, as evidenced by this photo taken by Flickr user oriolsalvador.

13. Are You Ready Kids?

While DeviantArt user Javas doesn’t label it as such, I feel like this is pretty much exactly what Futurama would look like if it were a '90s cartoon, right down to Zoidberg’s dopey smile and Fry’s dope jacket.

14. In Glorious Cinema-Scope!

If the show were a mid-century cheesy sci-fi film, this is pretty much exactly what the poster would look like—complete with flying saucers, a seductive woman being carried and terrified, pointing bystanders. DeviantArt user OnlyMilo pretty much nailed it here.

BONUS: The Live Action Intro

Ever wonder what Futurama would look like if it was a low budget live action show instead of an animated series? Well, the chintzy effects used in this great ad by Comedy Central should give you some idea.

University of York
Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
UK Archaeologists Have Found One of the World’s Oldest 'Crayons'
University of York
University of York

A prehistoric chunk of pigment found near an ancient lake in England may be one of the world's oldest crayons, Colossal reports. The small object made of red ochre was discovered during an archaeological excavation near Lake Flixton, a prehistoric lake that has since become a peat wetland but was once occupied by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Though it’s hard to date the crayon itself, it was found in a layer of earth dating back to the 7th millennium BCE, according to a recent study by University of York archaeologists.

Measuring less than an inch long, the piece of pigment is sharpened at one end, and its shape indicates that it was modified by a person and used extensively as a tool, not shaped by nature. The piece "looks exactly like a crayon," study author Andy Needham of the University of York said in a press release.

A pebble of red ochre thought to be a prehistoric crayon
University of York

The fine grooves and striations on the crayon suggest that it was used as a drawing tool, and indicate that it might have been rubbed against a granular surface (like a rock). Other research has found that ochre was collected and used widely by prehistoric hunter-gatherers like the ones who lived near Lake Flixton, bolstering the theory that it was used as a tool.

The researchers also found another, pebble-shaped fragment of red ochre at a nearby site, which was scraped so heavily that it became concave, indicating that it might have been used to extract the pigment as a red powder.

"The pebble and crayon were located in an area already rich in art," Needham said. "It is possible there could have been an artistic use for these objects, perhaps for coloring animal skins or for use in decorative artwork."

[h/t Colossal]

Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Tour the National Museum of Scotland From Home With Google Street View
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Google's Street View technology can be used to view some amazing art, whether it's behind the walls of the Palace of Versailles in France or the Guggenheim Museum in New York. As the BBC reports, the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh is the latest institution to receive the virtual treatment.

The museum contains items tracing the history of the world and humanity. In the Natural World galleries, visitors will find a hulking Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton and a panorama of wildlife. In the World Cultures galleries, there are centuries' worth of art and innovation to see. The museum's permanent galleries and the 20,000 objects on display can all be viewed from home thanks to the new online experience.

Users can navigate the virtual museum as they would a regular location on Street View. Just click the area you wish to explore and drag your cursor for full 365-degree views. If there's a particular piece that catches your interest, you may be able to learn more about it from Google Arts & Culture. The site has added 1000 items from the National Museum of Scotland to its database, complete with high-resolution photos and detailed descriptions.

The Street View tour is a convenient option for art lovers outside the UK, but the museum is also worth visiting in person: Like its virtual counterpart, admission to the institution is free.

[h/t BBC]


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