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14 Fantastic Futurama Fan Art Creations

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Last night, Futurama aired its final episode. Let's take a look back at a few of the coolest Futurama artworks ever created during the show's run.

1. The Horrors of Reality

As a cartoon character, Nibbler looks adorable and cuddly. But if he were real, that might not be the case. In fact, when artist Jared Krichevsky used 3D software to imagine what Futurama characters would look like in real life, the results ended up overwhelmingly creepy.

2. Real Life in Clay

Here’s another take on what the Planet Express crew would look like in the real world as envisioned by DeviantArt user artanis-one. While the Professor and Leela look similar, though more realistic, Dr. Zoidberg has changed from everyone’s favorite bumbling lobster man into an alien you’d expect to see on Star Trek.

3. Hayao Miyazaki's Futurama

Would Bender be a lot kinder if he was a product of Hayao Miyazaki's imagination instead of Matt Groening? Given Miyazaki's past creations like Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle and Ponyo, I’m willing to say yes—and Bouletcorp’s take on the robot as a Miyazaki character only further illustrates that point.

4. X-Rama

When Futurama characters are given mutant powers and start resembling X-Men, havoc is bound to ensue. DeviantArt user gottabecarl shows what the mash up between these two universes would probably look like.

5. The Futurelement

While I don’t really picture Fry pulling off any role Bruce Willis has ever played, the rest of the characters in this mash up work pretty well—especially Professor Farnsworth as Ruby Rod. All in all, this is a great take on The Fifth Element, courtesy of DeviantArt user RikudaSanin.

6. In 8-Bit

If Community could do an episode in 8-bit, then Futurama surely could as well—and it would probably look a lot like this video, created by YouTube user GrandmaBird.

7. LEGO

Speaking of 8-bit, here’s the entire Planet Express building in New New York, along with many of the company’s employees, all in blocky, LEGO form.  The entire creation was done by Pepa Quin and she has plenty more pictures of the project on her Flickr stream.

8. Stained Glass

Are you a nerd looking to spruce up your home with something classy like a stained glass art piece? Then you’ll love Nerd Glass. They have two different Futurama designs, one featuring Bender and one with Dr. Zoidberg.

9. Roasting On An Open Bender

You may not want to bite Bender’s shiny metal butt, but biting into something cooked in said butt is an entirely different story. You can see the process Blogspot user halftroll used to make the Bender stove in this impressively lengthy blog post.

10. Fry and Leela: The Next Generation

For years fans waited to see if Fry would ever actually hook up with Leela. Now that he has, it’s time to start wondering if they’ll settle down and make a family. If they do, I hope they look like these adorable little brats drawn by Redditor doodiescoop.

11. Home Is Where The Fry IS

You know you’ve made it big when your face has been embroidered by a fan. Etsy seller It's a Stitch sells a variety of geeky embroidery projects, including this brilliant design featuring one of Fry’s most famous lines.

12. Put The Clamps On This Wall

Even street artists in Barcelona are fans of Futurama, or at least the show’s robotic gangsters, as evidenced by this photo taken by Flickr user oriolsalvador.

13. Are You Ready Kids?

While DeviantArt user Javas doesn’t label it as such, I feel like this is pretty much exactly what Futurama would look like if it were a '90s cartoon, right down to Zoidberg’s dopey smile and Fry’s dope jacket.

14. In Glorious Cinema-Scope!

If the show were a mid-century cheesy sci-fi film, this is pretty much exactly what the poster would look like—complete with flying saucers, a seductive woman being carried and terrified, pointing bystanders. DeviantArt user OnlyMilo pretty much nailed it here.

BONUS: The Live Action Intro

Ever wonder what Futurama would look like if it was a low budget live action show instead of an animated series? Well, the chintzy effects used in this great ad by Comedy Central should give you some idea.

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Microscopic Videos Provide a Rare Close-Up Glimpse of the Natural World
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Courtesy of Nikon

Nature’s wonders aren’t always visible to the naked eye. To celebrate the miniature realm, Nikon’s Small World in Motion digital video competition awards prizes to the most stunning microscopic moving images, as filmed and submitted by photographers and scientists. The winners of the seventh annual competition were just announced on September 21—and you can check out the top submissions below.

FIRST PRIZE

Daniel von Wangenheim, a biologist at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, took first place with a time-lapse video of thale cress root growth. For the uninitiated, thale cress—known to scientists as Arabidopsis thalianais a small flowering plant, considered by many to be a weed. Plant and genetics researchers like thale cress because of its fast growth cycle, abundant seed production, ability to pollinate itself, and wild genes, which haven’t been subjected to breeding and artificial selection.

Von Wangenheim’s footage condenses 17 hours of root tip growth into just 10 seconds. Magnified with a confocal microscope, the root appears neon green and pink—but von Wangenheim’s work shouldn’t be appreciated only for its aesthetics, he explains in a Nikon news release.

"Once we have a better understanding of the behavior of plant roots and its underlying mechanisms, we can help them grow deeper into the soil to reach water, or defy gravity in upper areas of the soil to adjust their root branching angle to areas with richer nutrients," said von Wangenheim, who studies how plants perceive and respond to gravity. "One step further, this could finally help to successfully grow plants under microgravity conditions in outer space—to provide food for astronauts in long-lasting missions."

SECOND PRIZE

Second place went to Tsutomu Tomita and Shun Miyazaki, both seasoned micro-photographers. They used a stereomicroscope to create a time-lapse video of a sweating fingertip, resulting in footage that’s both mesmerizing and gross.

To prompt the scene, "Tomita created tension amongst the subjects by showing them a video of daredevils climbing to the top of a skyscraper," according to Nikon. "Sweating is a common part of daily life, but being able to see it at a microscopic level is equal parts enlightening and cringe-worthy."

THIRD PRIZE

Third prize was awarded to Satoshi Nishimura, a professor from Japan’s Jichi Medical University who’s also a photography hobbyist. He filmed leukocyte accumulations and platelet aggregations in injured mouse cells. The rainbow-hued video "provides a rare look at how the body reacts to a puncture wound and begins the healing process by creating a blood clot," Nikon said.

To view the complete list of winners, visit Nikon’s website.

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‘American Gothic’ Became Famous Because Many People Saw It as a Joke
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Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In 1930, Iowan artist Grant Wood painted a simple portrait of a farmer and his wife (really his dentist and sister) standing solemnly in front of an all-American farmhouse. American Gothic has since inspired endless parodies and is regarded as one of the country’s most iconic works of art. But when it first came out, few people would have guessed it would become the classic it is today. Vox explains the painting’s unexpected path to fame in the latest installment of the new video series Overrated.

According to host Phil Edwards, American Gothic made a muted splash when it first hit the art scene. The work was awarded a third-place bronze medal in a contest at the Chicago Art Institute. When Wood sold the painting to the museum later on, he received just $300 for it. But the piece’s momentum didn’t stop there. It turned out that American Gothic’s debut at a time when urban and rural ideals were clashing helped it become the defining image of the era. The painting had something for everyone: Metropolitans like Gertrude Stein saw it as a satire of simple farm life in Middle America. Actual farmers and their families, on the other hand, welcomed it as celebration of their lifestyle and work ethic at a time when the Great Depression made it hard to take pride in anything.

Wood didn’t do much to clear up the work’s true meaning. He stated, "There is satire in it, but only as there is satire in any realistic statement. These are types of people I have known all my life. I tried to characterize them truthfully—to make them more like themselves than they were in actual life."

Rather than suffering from its ambiguity, American Gothic has been immortalized by it. The country has changed a lot in the past century, but the painting’s dual roles as a straight masterpiece and a format for skewering American culture still endure today.

Get the full story from Vox below.

[h/t Vox]

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