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14 Fantastic Futurama Fan Art Creations

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Youtube

Last night, Futurama aired its final episode. Let's take a look back at a few of the coolest Futurama artworks ever created during the show's run.

1. The Horrors of Reality

As a cartoon character, Nibbler looks adorable and cuddly. But if he were real, that might not be the case. In fact, when artist Jared Krichevsky used 3D software to imagine what Futurama characters would look like in real life, the results ended up overwhelmingly creepy.

2. Real Life in Clay

Here’s another take on what the Planet Express crew would look like in the real world as envisioned by DeviantArt user artanis-one. While the Professor and Leela look similar, though more realistic, Dr. Zoidberg has changed from everyone’s favorite bumbling lobster man into an alien you’d expect to see on Star Trek.

3. Hayao Miyazaki's Futurama

Would Bender be a lot kinder if he was a product of Hayao Miyazaki's imagination instead of Matt Groening? Given Miyazaki's past creations like Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle and Ponyo, I’m willing to say yes—and Bouletcorp’s take on the robot as a Miyazaki character only further illustrates that point.

4. X-Rama

When Futurama characters are given mutant powers and start resembling X-Men, havoc is bound to ensue. DeviantArt user gottabecarl shows what the mash up between these two universes would probably look like.

5. The Futurelement

While I don’t really picture Fry pulling off any role Bruce Willis has ever played, the rest of the characters in this mash up work pretty well—especially Professor Farnsworth as Ruby Rod. All in all, this is a great take on The Fifth Element, courtesy of DeviantArt user RikudaSanin.

6. In 8-Bit

If Community could do an episode in 8-bit, then Futurama surely could as well—and it would probably look a lot like this video, created by YouTube user GrandmaBird.

7. LEGO

Speaking of 8-bit, here’s the entire Planet Express building in New New York, along with many of the company’s employees, all in blocky, LEGO form.  The entire creation was done by Pepa Quin and she has plenty more pictures of the project on her Flickr stream.

8. Stained Glass

Are you a nerd looking to spruce up your home with something classy like a stained glass art piece? Then you’ll love Nerd Glass. They have two different Futurama designs, one featuring Bender and one with Dr. Zoidberg.

9. Roasting On An Open Bender

You may not want to bite Bender’s shiny metal butt, but biting into something cooked in said butt is an entirely different story. You can see the process Blogspot user halftroll used to make the Bender stove in this impressively lengthy blog post.

10. Fry and Leela: The Next Generation

For years fans waited to see if Fry would ever actually hook up with Leela. Now that he has, it’s time to start wondering if they’ll settle down and make a family. If they do, I hope they look like these adorable little brats drawn by Redditor doodiescoop.

11. Home Is Where The Fry IS

You know you’ve made it big when your face has been embroidered by a fan. Etsy seller It's a Stitch sells a variety of geeky embroidery projects, including this brilliant design featuring one of Fry’s most famous lines.

12. Put The Clamps On This Wall

Even street artists in Barcelona are fans of Futurama, or at least the show’s robotic gangsters, as evidenced by this photo taken by Flickr user oriolsalvador.

13. Are You Ready Kids?

While DeviantArt user Javas doesn’t label it as such, I feel like this is pretty much exactly what Futurama would look like if it were a '90s cartoon, right down to Zoidberg’s dopey smile and Fry’s dope jacket.

14. In Glorious Cinema-Scope!

If the show were a mid-century cheesy sci-fi film, this is pretty much exactly what the poster would look like—complete with flying saucers, a seductive woman being carried and terrified, pointing bystanders. DeviantArt user OnlyMilo pretty much nailed it here.

BONUS: The Live Action Intro

Ever wonder what Futurama would look like if it was a low budget live action show instead of an animated series? Well, the chintzy effects used in this great ad by Comedy Central should give you some idea.

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Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
The Covers of Jack Kerouac's Classic Titles Are Getting a Makeover
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press

Readers have been enjoying classic Jack Kerouac books like The Dharma Bums and On the Road for decades, but starting this August the novels will have a new look. Several abstract covers have been unveiled as part of Penguin’s "Great Kerouac" series, according to design website It’s Nice That.

The vibrant covers, designed by Tom Etherington of Penguin Press, feature the works of abstract expressionist painter Franz Kline. The artwork is intended to capture “the experience of reading Kerouac” rather than illustrating a particular scene or character, Etherington told It’s Nice That. Indeed, abstract styles of artwork seem a fitting match for Kerouac’s “spontaneous prose”—a writing style that was influenced by improvisational jazz music.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of The Dharma Bums, which was published just one year after On the Road. The Great Kerouac series will be available for purchase on August 2.

[h/t It's Nice That]

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John MacDougall, Getty Images
Stolpersteine: One Artist's International Memorial to the Holocaust
John MacDougall, Getty Images
John MacDougall, Getty Images

The most startling memorial to victims of the Holocaust may also be the easiest to miss. Embedded in the sidewalks of more than 20 countries, more than 60,000 Stolpersteine—German for “stumbling stones”—mark the spots where victims last resided before they were forced to leave their homes. The modest, nearly 4-by-4-inch brass blocks, each the size of a single cobblestone, are planted outside the doorways of row houses, bakeries, and coffee houses. Each tells a simple yet chilling story: A person lived here. This is what happened to them.

Here lived Hugo Lippers
Born 1878
Arrested 11/9/1938 — Altstrelitzer prison
Deported 1942 Auschwitz
Murdered

The project is the brainchild of the German artist Gunter Demnig, who first had the idea in the early 1990s as he studied the Nazis' deportation of Sinti and Roma people. His first installations were guerrilla artwork: According to Reuters, Demnig laid his first 41 blocks in Berlin without official approval. The city, however, soon endorsed the idea and granted him permission to install more. Today, Berlin has more than 5000.

Demnig lays a Stolpersteine.
Artist Gunter Demnig lays a Stolpersteine outside a residence in Hamburg, Germany in 2012.
Patrick Lux, Getty Images

The Stolpersteine are unique in their individuality. Too often, the millions of Holocaust victims are spoken of as a nameless mass. And while the powerful memorials and museums in places such as Berlin and Washington, D.C. are an antidote to that, the Stolpersteine are special—they are decentralized, integrated into everyday life. You can walk down a sidewalk, look down, and suddenly find yourself standing where a person's life changed. History becomes unavoidably present.

That's because, unlike gravestones, the stumbling stones mark an important date between a person’s birth and death: the day that person was forced to abandon his or her home. As a result, not every stumbling stone is dedicated to a person who was murdered. Some plaques commemorate people who fled Europe and survived. Others honor people who were deported but managed to escape. The plaques aim to memorialize the moment a person’s life was irrevocably changed—no matter how it ended.

The ordinariness of the surrounding landscape—a buzzing cafe, a quaint bookstore, a tree-lined street—only heightens that effect. As David Crew writes for Not Even Past, “[Demnig] thought the stones would encourage ordinary citizens to realize that Nazi persecution and terror had begun on their very doorsteps."

A man in a shop holding a hammer making a Stolpersteine.
Artisan Michael Friedrichs-Friedlaender hammers inscriptions into the brass plaques at the Stolpersteine manufacturing studio in Berlin.
Sean Gallup, Getty Images

While Demnig installs every single Stolpersteine himself, he does not work alone. His project, which stretches from Germany to Brazil, relies on the research of hundreds of outside volunteers. Their efforts have not only helped Demnig create a striking memorial, but have also helped historians better document the lives of individuals who will never be forgotten.

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