25 Brilliant Halloween Life Hacks

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iStock

Halloween season is here, which means a lot of scrambling to find costumes, navigating fake spider webs, and cleaning pumpkin guts off of your kitchen table. If you find yourself getting a little stressed over the festivities, check out these 25 life hacks that promise to make your holiday prep a little less scary.

1. WHIP UP SOME CONVINCING FAKE BLOOD

A smear of fake blood on a white background
iStock

Need some faux-plasma to add to the atmosphere? Check your cupboards: a mixture of corn syrup, red food coloring, and corn flour not only looks like crime scene spatter, but it’s edible, too.

2. MAKE A MUMMY MUG

Mugs are wrapped in gauze to represent a mummy motif
FaveCrafts, YouTube

Who needs expensive novelty cups, when you can conjure up a convincing mummy mug. Simply wrap a regular coffee mug in medical gauze and add googly eyes with a little Elmer’s glue. Want to give a juice box the same treatment? Use some white masking tape and add another pair of eyes. It also works well on Mason jars.

3. SPOOKY WATER BOTTLES

A water bottle features a decorative Halloween label
iStock

To get bottled water in the holiday spirit, just grab some Halloween-themed decorative tape and wrap it around the regular label.

4. A SEVERED HAND IN THE PUNCH BOWL

A hand-shaped block of ice floats in a punch bowl
All Recipes UK, YouTube

Grab a rubber glove, fill it with water, and place it in the freezer. A few hours later, you’ll have a solid block of hand-shaped ice to drop into the punch bowl for your party. (Just remember to cut the glove off first.)

5. GHOST LOLLIPOPS

Lollipops are wrapped in coffee filters for a ghostly appearance
Emma Craig, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Even the innocent lollipop can become a symbol of the undead. All you need are some coffee filters (or tissues) and string: Wrap the filter around the head of the lollipop, then tie it off with the string.

6. A HEALTHY SPOOKY TREAT

Bananas and chocolate chips are utilized for a spooky snack
iStock

Halloween parties are usually overstuffed with cupcakes, candies, and other tooth-endangering treats. For a quick snack that’s still seasonally appropriate, you can take a banana and stuff three chocolate chips in it to make a face. You can also make a deliberate peel so it resembles a flayed banana. (Just eat it quick, before it turns brown. Otherwise, it’s just a rotting banana corpse.)

7. PEPPER DIP BOWLS

Bell peppers sit in a pile
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Hollow out a pepper and use it as a dipping station for your dressings. The orange tint will give off an appropriately Halloween vibe.

8. A CHEAP, EFFORTLESS COSTUME

Reminder notes are pasted on a person for a low-effort costume idea
iStock

Nothing says “I can’t be bothered” more than sticking some Post-It style notes to your shirt and declaring yourself a bulletin board. Still, it’ll work if you’re pressed for time. (And if you have a pair of costume bear ears laying around, go for the Bear Minimum.)

9. GROSS HAND SOAP

Two toy spiders await their chance to freak someone out
iStock

Want to creep out guests who are looking to wash up? Grab some toy spiders and put them inside a clear plastic hand soap dispenser.

10. A BLOODY CANDLE

A bloody candle can be an effective Halloween visual
athomewithcindy, YouTube

A simple but effective trick: Take a white candle, then light a red candle over it and let the wax drip down to create a blood-dripping effect. Make sure to use caution when operating a lighter.

11. DRYER VENT PUMPKINS

A pumpkin made from a flexible dryer vent
FaveCrafts, YouTube

Taking a metal dryer vent and creating a loop leads to a close replica to a pumpkin: You can paint them in any color you desire and add a fake stem using a cinnamon stick.

12. THE FLOATING CHEESECLOTH GHOST

Cheesecloth is used to create a ghostly decoration
CraftKlatch, YouTube

Want to really spook guests with your apparent mastery of the dark crafting arts? Take a piece of cheesecloth and drape it over a solid object like a large soda bottle with some wires to support where the arms would be. Then, spray it with starch to make it stiff. When you remove the bottle, the cloth will look like it’s hovering by itself.

13. SURGICAL GLOVE TREAT BAGS

A pair of surgical gloves
iStock

Take a see-through surgical glove (available at most pharmacies) and stuff with treats. The disembodied hand effect is cooler than a standard treat sack and can be tied off at the top to prevent candy from spilling out.

14. SPOOKY SPAGHETTI

Black pasta is presented on a table
iStock

A little black food coloring added to boiling pasta water can transform dinner into a disgusting feast! The spaghetti will stain, but once cooked, it won’t stain your mouth. And you and the kids can pretend to be eating worms.

15. VAMPIRE BATHROOM OCCUPANCY

Fake vampire teeth sit at the bottom of a water glass
iStock

Fill up a glass of water and use it to store toothbrushes—inside the glass, drop in a set of plastic vampire teeth. It’ll look like you have an elderly bloodsucker lurking in your residence.

16. SEVERED FINGER APPETIZERS

A jar of chicken broth
iStock

Grab a Mason jar and fill it with hot soup of your choice—just make sure it’s transparent. (Chicken broth is ideal.) Then, plop in some chicken sausages that have been cooked and perforated—the curled links will resemble severed fingers when submerged.

17. POOL NOODLE WITCH LEGS

A pair of pool noodle witch legs stick out from a planter
Teri Cumming, YouTube

Want to give off the impression that a wicked witch has met a crushing fate? Take a pool noodle, cover two halves with striped stockings, and add shoes. The prop will make it look like your nemesis has been squashed by a TV stand, potted plant, or sofa.

18. SCARY TOILET PAPER ROLLS

Rolls of spooky toilet paper will haunt your bowel movements
iStock

This cheap hack can make your guest bathroom into a veritable haunted location—and not because of the smell. Use construction paper to cut two eyes and a mouth and tape to your stacked toilet paper rolls for a ghost-like appearance.

19. SNACK-O-LANTERNS

Oranges are cut into Halloween designs and stuffed with treats
iStock

Orange skin actually makes for a credible pumpkin carving substitute. After scooping out the insides, you can use a small carving knife to etch out a face and then fill the orange with small candy treats.

20. A PUMPKIN ICE BUCKET

A pumpkin is full of ice
Leaf, YouTube

Nothing says Halloween like a clean pumpkin, stripped free of its sticky guts. If you grab a spare and hollow it out, you can fill it up with ice and use it to keep refreshments cold.

21. DUCT TAPE YOUR PUMPKIN

Pumpkins that have been decorated using tape
Better Homes and Gardens, YouTube

There are endless alternatives to the mess of carving a pumpkin: One of them is to buy decorative duct tape and use it to tape over the surface of the fruit. No cutting, no gutting, and minimal rotting required.

22. SPIRITED MILK JUGS

Milk jugs are used for Halloween decorations
Quinn Dombrowski, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Want a sprawling outdoor display without a lot of work? Take a bunch of galloon milk jugs, draw faces on them, then cut a hole in the bottom. Then, run a string of holiday lights on the ground and place the jug over one of the lights to create a line-up of spooky sentries.

23. DIY SPIDERS

A foam spider with pipe cleaners for legs
Make a Paper Boat, YouTube

Pick up some foam balls, run them through with pipe cleaners for legs, then use some black spray paint. You’ll soon have an army of (somewhat adorable) spiders to do your bidding.

24. PICKLED HEAD IN A JAR

A photograph of a face appears in a jar
Instructables, YouTube

For the ultimate feat of surprise terror, follow Instructables user Mike Warren’s directions on making your face into a pickled head in a jar. Take a panoramic shot of your face (front and sides), then print on a single sheet, laminate, and stuff into a clear jar. Add water with a light green tint and voila—it’ll look like your melon is floating in preservatives.

25. A CLIP TO KEEP CANDY FRESH

A paper clip is used to seal an open candy wrapper
iStock

If you're left with opened bags of treat-sized candy? Clip the open side of the wrapper with a paper binder to save it for a future binge.

Everything You Need to Know About the New DC Universe Streaming Service

Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Warner Bros. Television

by Natalie Zamora

Although the fates of two major DC superheroes, Superman and Batman, are kind of up in the air right now as far as for their Extended Universes, things are looking up for the franchise, as their exclusive streaming service has just launched. Here's everything you need to know about DC Universe.

THE SIGNIFICANCE

With all the different types of streaming services we have today, why is DC Universe so special, and why would someone pay for it if they can find the content elsewhere? Well, this streaming service allows all your favorite DC content to live in one space. Instead of having to search for what you want throughout the internet, you can find it all here. For the die-hard fan, this is perfect.

DC Universe offers an impressive collection of live-action and animated movies, TV shows, documentaries, and comic books. The service also offers exclusive toys you can only get by being a subscriber.

THE CONTENT

Heath Ledger stars as The Joker in 'The Dark Knight' (2008)
© TM & DC Comics/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

So, what exact DC content lives on DC Universe? Well, there's a range of content from recent to old-school, such as Batman: The Animated Series, The Dark Knight, Teen Titans, and Constantine. Apart from what's on there now, the service will be debuting the live-action Titans series later this year, along with Swamp Thing and Doom Patrol in 2019. DC is also developing new series for Harley Quinn and Young Justice: Outsiders, exclusively for the service.

THE PRICE

​To get all of this exclusive DC content, it must be expensive, right? No, not really. Compared to Netflix, which is $10.99 a month, DC Universe is inexpensive, at a rate of $7.99 monthly or $74.99 annually. It is a bit pricier than Hulu, however, which is $5.99 monthly for the first year, then $7.99 monthly after. Like most streaming services, you can also try a free seven-day trial with DC Universe.

HOW TO SIGN UP

​Are you sold? If so, the sign up process is fairly simple. Head to ​DC Universe, create an account, and choose your plan, either monthly or annually. Either way, you'll get your free seven-day trial to browse around and see for yourself if it's really worth it.

10 Classic Books That Have Been Banned

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iStock

From the Bible to Harry Potter, some of the world's most popular books have been challenged for reasons ranging from violence to occult overtones. In honor of National Book Lovers Day, here's a look at 10 classic books that have stirred up controversy.

1. THE CALL OF THE WILD

The Call of the Wild, Jack London's 1903 Klondike Gold Rush-set adventure, was banned in Yugoslavia and Italy for being "too radical" and was burned by the Nazis because of the author's well-known socialist leanings.

2. THE GRAPES OF WRATH

Though The Grapes of Wrath—John Steinbeck's 1939 novel about a family of tenant farmers who are forced to leave their Oklahoma home for California because of economic hardships—earned the author both the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, it also drew ire across America because some believed it promoted Communist values. Kern County, California (where much of the book took place) was particular incensed by Steinbeck's portrayal of the area and its working conditions, which they considered slanderous.

3. THE LORAX

The cover of Dr. Seuss' The Lorax
Google Play

Whereas some readers look at the title character Dr. Seuss's The Lorax and see a fuzzy little guy who "speaks for the trees," others saw the 1971 children's book as a dangerous piece of political commentary, with even the author reportedly referring to it as "propaganda."

4. ULYSSES

James Joyce's 1922 novel Ulysses may be one of the most important and influential works of the early 20th century, but it was also deemed obscene for both its language and sexual content—and not just in a few provincial places. In 1921, a group known as The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice successfully managed to keep the book out of the United States, and the United States Post Office regularly burned copies of it. But in 1933, the book's publisher, Random House, took the case—United States v. One Book Called Ulysses—to court, and ended up getting the ban overturned.

5. ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

In 1929, Erich Maria Remarque—a German World War I veteran—wrote the novel All Quiet on the Western Front, which gives an accounting of the extreme mental and physical stress the German soldiers faced during their time in the war. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the book's realism didn't sit well with Nazi leaders, who feared the book would deter their propaganda efforts.

6. ANIMAL FARM

The cover of George Orwell's Animal Farm
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The original publication of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegorical novella, was delayed in the UK because of its anti-Stalin themes. It was confiscated in Germany by Allied troops, banned in Yugoslavia in 1946, banned in Kenya in 1991, and banned in the United Arab Emirates in 2002.

7. AS I LAY DYING

Though many people consider William Faulkner's 1930 novel As I Lay Dying a classic piece of American literature, the Graves County School District in Mayfield, Kentucky disagreed. In 1986, the school district banned the book because it questioned the existence of God.

8. LOLITA

Sure, it's well known that Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita is about a middle-aged literature professor who is obsessed with a 12-year-old girl who eventually becomes his stepdaughter. It's the kind of storyline that would raise eyebrows today, so imagine what the response was when the book was released in 1955. A number of countries—including France, England, Argentina, New Zealand, and South Africa—banned the book for being obscene. Canada did the same in 1958, though it later lifted the ban on what is now considered a classic piece of literature—unreliable narrator and all.

9. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE

Cover of The Catcher in the Rye

Reading J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye has practically become a rite of passage for teenagers, but back when it was published in 1951, it wasn't always easy for a kid to get his or her hands on it. According to TIME, "Within two weeks of its 1951 release, J.D. Salinger’s novel rocketed to No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Ever since, the book—which explores three days in the life of a troubled 16-year-old boy—has been a 'favorite of censors since its publication,' according to the American Library Association."

10. THE GIVER

The newest book on this list, Lois Lowry's 1993 novel The Giverabout a dystopia masquerading as a utopiawas banned in several U.S. states, including California and Kentucky, for addressing issues such as euthanasia.

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