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27 Awesome Vintage Photos of Moms

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While you celebrate your mom, take a look back at mothers through the ages. All photos and captions via Getty Images.

1. January 1860: A mother and children in the parlor.

2. 1876: A mother with her adolescent daughter.

3. 1885: A young couple take the opportunity to have a cuddle while mother is asleep over her paper.

4. 1890: Collecting peat in the Killarney countryside, County Kerry, a barefooted mother carries a basket on her back while her young children sit at her feet.

5. 1900: American native mother of the Hopi tribe with a child on her back.

6. 1900: A mother gives her daughter a drink at the bar of a public house, while the baby sleeps in a pram beside her.

7. 1910: A child sits quietly as his mother knits Shetland wool into jumpers.

8. 1910: A mother walks with her baby and holds the new Sturgis baby carriage which can be folded up and carried.

9. 1911: A child plays in the sand with her spade, whilst her mother and aunt look on, at a riverside spot in Fulham, London.

10. 1920: Motor meeting at Brooklands, Weybridge, Surrey. Competitor Ivy Cummings and her mother in their racing car.

11. 1925: A woman keeps a firm grip on a rope tied around her daughter's waist during a cliff-top walk.

12. 1925: A Palestinian mother in typical dress holding her child.

13. 1926: A mother gets all the exercise she needs pushing her pram and cycling at the same time and the baby gets a taste for speed at an early age.

14. 1930: A mother enjoying a tea party with her young daughter.

15. 1930: A Japanese mother fans her baby who is lying on a cushion on the floor.

16. 1932: A small girl in a push chair modelled on a horse-drawn carriage, out for a stroll in Hyde Park, London, with her mother and a Great Dane.

17. 1935: Mother and daughter sunbathing in similar knitted costumes.

18. 1935: A mother towing her children to school at Burrowbridge near Bridgewater during severe flooding.

19. March 1936: June Bishop (left) who is three, seen with her mother who owns a pet shop in Alton, Hampshire. June takes her pet sheep out with her wherever she goes, rather like the nursery rhyme.

20. 1937: A mother fastening a notice reading 'Please Mr Motorist, watch out for me', onto her son's back before he sets out on a trial bicycle ride.

21. 1940: A mother and her baby ready for evacuation from London, under a London County Council Scheme. The mother is carrying a gas mask designed especially for babies.

22. 1950: Mother and child looking at the monkey cage at a zoo in Puerto Rico.

23. 1950: A baby girl and her mother play with a harmless Indigo snake at a serpentarium.

24. 1953: A woman seeing her new born baby whilst lying inside an iron lung as part of her treatment for Polio.

25. 1960: Proud mother Liu Wan-Fu of Tientsin or Tianjin in China displays her 6-month-old quadruplets, a girl and three boys.

26. 1963: Sixteen year old trainee chef Peter Maddox of Hollingworth, Cheshire practices his hobby of fire-eating out of the window, as his mother and nine month old brother look on.

27. 1970: Portrait of a mother sitting with her young girl.

This post originally appeared last year.

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music
Everything You Need to Know About Record Store Day
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The unlikely resurgence of vinyl as an alternative to digital music formats is made up of more than just a small subculture of purists. Today, more than 1400 independent record stores deal in both vintage and current releases. Those store owners and community supporters created Record Store Day in 2007 as a way of celebrating the grassroots movement that’s allowed a once-dying medium to thrive.

To commemorate this year’s Record Store Day on Saturday, April 21, a number of stores (a searchable list can be found here) will be offering promotional items, live music, signings, and more. While events vary widely by store, a number of artists will be issuing exclusive LPs that will be distributed around the country.

For Grateful Dead fans, a live recording of a February 27, 1969 show at Fillmore West in San Francisco will be released and limited to 6700 copies; Arcade Fire’s 2003 EP album will see a vinyl release for the first time, limited to 3000 copies; "Roxanne," the Police single celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, will see a 7-inch single release with the original jacket art.

The day also promises to be a big one for David Bowie fans. A special white vinyl version of 1977’s Bowie Now will be on shelves, along with Welcome to the Blackout (Live London ’78), a previously-unreleased, three-record set. Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Neil Young, and dozens of other artists will also be contributing releases.

No store is likely to carry everything you might want, so before making the stop, it might be best to call ahead and then plan on getting there early. If you’re one of the unlucky vinyl supporters without a brick and mortar store nearby, you can check out Discogs.com, which will be selling the special releases online.

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Big Questions
What Is the Meaning Behind "420"?
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Whether or not you’re a marijuana enthusiast, you’re probably aware that today is an unofficial holiday for those who are. April 20—4/20—is a day when pot smokers around the world come together to, well, smoke pot. Others use the day to push for legalization, holding marches and rallies.

But why the code 420? There are a lot of theories as to why that particular number was chosen, but most of them are wrong. You may have heard that 420 is police code for possession, or maybe it’s the penal code for marijuana use. Both are false. There is a California Senate Bill 420 that refers to the use of medical marijuana, but the bill was named for the code, not the other way around.

As far as anyone can tell, the phrase started with a bunch of high school students. Back in 1971, a group of kids at San Rafael High School in San Rafael, California, got in the habit of meeting at 4:20 to smoke after school. When they’d see each other in the hallways during the day, their shorthand was “420 Louis,” meaning, “Let’s meet at the Louis Pasteur statue at 4:20 to smoke.”

Somehow, the phrase caught on—and when the Grateful Dead eventually picked it up, "420" spread through the greater community like wildfire. What began as a silly code passed between classes is now a worldwide event for smokers and legalization activists everywhere—not a bad accomplishment for a bunch of high school stoners.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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