The Commodore 64 Will Return as a Mini Console With Dozens of Games

Retro Games Limited
Retro Games Limited

Today’s video games may be more innovative than ever, but that doesn’t stop many from returning to the old-school games that remind them of their childhood. Following Nintendo’s massive success with the NES Classic in 2016 and the SNES Classic in September, the Commodore 64 is set to be the next vintage gaming device to get a miniature makeover. As Nerdist reports, Retro Games Limited will release a plug-and-play version of the 1982 bestseller in 2018.

The C64 Mini will be half the size of the original Commodore 64 computer and will feature 64 retro 8-bit titles, including Impossible Mission, Armalyte, Paradroid, and California Games. The kit will include a joystick, an HDMI cable for hooking up the console to your TV, and a USB power cable for charging it.

The console will have two USB ports that can be used to connect an extra joystick or plug in a full-sized keyboard to use the C64 Mini for simple coding. This could be especially useful when you get bored of the pre-loaded games and want to program a new one of your own from scratch.

The C64 Mini is set to retail for around $70 when it hits shelves in 2018, making it $10 cheaper than the newly-released SNES classic. Retro Games also plans to revive a full-sized version of the original Commodore 64 to sell in 2018. For an idea of what that might look like, check out this classic Commodore 64 how-to video from 1982.

[h/t Nerdist]

Chucky Got a Makeover, and the Original Child's Play Creator Isn't Happy About It

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

In early July, horror movie fans got word that a reboot of Child’s Play was in the works at MGM with Polaroid director Lars Klevberg and It producers David Katzenberg and Seth Grahame-Smith. While the team has been pretty quiet about what to expect from new film (production is only just now getting off the ground in Vancouver), the biggest question on fans’ minds is: What will Chucky look like? They got their answer late last week when Entertainment Weekly shared a sneak peek photo from the film.

While the photo only showed half of Chucky’s face (the other half was obscured by the knife the homicidal doll was holding), it was clear that this isn’t the same Good Guy doll so many fans have come to know and love (and fear). Klevberg told EW that they’ll be using both practical and digital effects to render Chucky 2.0 and that, “Our Chucky will be our Chucky and he will be presented when the movie comes out.”

One person who wasn’t thrilled with this news? Filmmaker Don Mancini, who turned what was supposed to be a congenial ginger doll into a murderous maniac with the release of the original Child’s Play in 1988. In the 30 years since, Chucky has become a major horror icon, thanks in large part to the full-blown horror franchise that Mancini inadvertently created—not to mention Brad Dourif, who has voiced Chucky in all seven films.

In July, Mancini told EW that he was offered the opportunity to get an executive producer credit on the reboot, but declined as he was concerned that the new film might “muddy” the brand. The sneak peek photo doesn’t seem to have eased his mind.

Shortly after EW’s image dropped, Mancini took to Twitter to give his take on the Chuckster’s new look:

Friends ‘til the end … or until a digital makeover.

The Most Popular Halloween Candy in Each State

If you've ever argued that no one actually likes candy corn, you're probably not from Alabama, Iowa, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Nevada, or Rhode Island. The controversial confection is a favorite treat among residents in those states, according to sales data from online candy retailer CandyStore.com.

As they've done for more than a decade, the bulk candy retailer combed through 11 years of data (with a particular focus on the months leading up to All Hallows' Eve) to gauge America’s top-selling sweets. They created the interactive map below to display their results.

Source: CandyStore.com.

In addition to the divisive—yet classic—candy corn, Skittles, M&Ms, Snickers, Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, and Starburst were among the nation's favorite candies. Hot Tamales, Tootsie Pops, Jolly Ranchers, and Sour Patch Kids have all earned some candy lovers' devotion, too.

Some states are unique in their top candy choices: Mississippi was the only state to name 3 Musketeers the best, while Connecticut opted for Almond Joy and West Virginia showed their love of Blow Pops. Meanwhile, trick-or-treaters in Kentucky have a sweet tooth for Swedish Fish, Louisianans love Lemonheads, and Delawareans would die for Life Savers.

After seeing which treat is number one in your state, check out the chart below to learn how many pounds of each top-ranking candy are consumed in each state (and then go buy a new toothbrush).

Source: CandyStore.com

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