Take a Virtual Peek Inside Denmark's New LEGO House

The LEGO Group
The LEGO Group

Grown-ups who wanted to live inside the LEGO-brick homes they built as a kid can now simulate the experience by visiting the Danish toy brand’s brand-new LEGO House in the company's hometown of Billund, Denmark.

As My Modern Met reports, the experiential playhouse opened its doors to LEGO loving fans of all ages on September 28, following seven years of planning and a four-year construction period. Danish architecture firm BIG designed the nearly 130,000-square-foot playhouse’s exterior to resemble a stack of 21 plastic bricks, with multi-colored rooftop terraces.

The LEGO House contains an official LEGO history museum as well as a Masterpiece Gallery area, featuring elaborate LEGO designs by fans around the world. It also features four color-coded playrooms—each designed to nurture a specific facet of play and learning—and three eateries, including the Mini Chef family restaurant, where customers can build their own orders out of bricks and have the real-life thing served on a conveyer belt by dancing robots.

“With LEGO House, we celebrate creativity and the strength of learning through play,” LEGO owner Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen said in a statement. “When they play, children learn the basic skills that they need, such as creativity, collaboration, and problem-solving abilities.”

The LEGO House is expected to have over 250,000 paid visitors per year, although fans can visit the site’s rooftop playgrounds, shop in the LEGO store, or dine at any of its restaurants without paying an entrance fee. Access to the house’s experiential zones costs around $31, and visits must be booked in advance through the LEGO House website due to space restrictions.

Check out some photos of the LEGO House below:

Facade of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark
Facade of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark
The LEGO Group

Aerial rooftop view of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark.
Aerial rooftop view of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark.
The LEGO Group

LEGO House visitors browse the Masterpiece Gallery, a display of works by members of the brand's artistic community.
LEGO House visitors browse the Masterpiece Gallery, a display of works by members of the brand's artistic community.
The LEGO Group

Oversize LEGO model sits on a LEGO House terrace in Billund, Denmark.
Oversize LEGO model sits on a LEGO House terrace
The LEGO Group

Children play near the Brick Builder Waterfall at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
Children play near the Brick Builder Waterfall at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
The LEGO Group

Children build LEGO flowers to plant in a special LEGO meadow at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
Children build LEGO flowers to plant in a special LEGO meadow.
The LEGO Group

Kids visiting the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark, play with LEGOs in the World Explorer section, which has three themed islands filled with LEGO mini-figures.
Kids play with LEGOs in the World Explorer section, which has three themed islands filled with LEGO mini-figures.

The LEGO Group

At the MINI CHEF family restaurant, located inside the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark, customers build their own order out of LEGO bricks  and have them served by dancing robots.
The MINI CHEF family restaurant, where customers build their own order out of LEGO bricks and have them served by dancing robots.
The LEGO Group

[h/t My Modern Met]

BioLite Has Designed a Headlamp That Won't Irritate or Slip Off Your Head

BioLite
BioLite

Headlamps are convenient in theory. Instead of fumbling with a flashlight or your phone in the dark, you can strap one to your head and walk your dog, do some late-night grilling, or venture around your campsite hands-free.

But in reality, the awkward design—with a bulky light that digs into your skin and slides down your forehead—cancels out much of the product's appeal. Luckily, it doesn't have to be this way, as the folks at BioLite have demonstrated with their reinvented headlamp.

The BioLite HeadLamp 330, which debuted on Kickstarter in 2018 and is now available on Amazon, promises to make you forget you're even wearing it. Inspired by modern wearables, BioLite has retooled various elements of the clunky traditional design to make it as comfortable as it is functional.

A man wearing a red HeadLamp 330
BioLite

The ultra-thin light sits flat against your skull, which means you won't have any painful marks in the middle of your forehead when you take it off. The band itself is made from a moisture-wicking fabric that feels good on your skin, even when you're working up a sweat. And unlike conventional headlamps, BioLite has redistributed the power source to the back of the head in its design, balancing the weight and taking care of any slippage issues.

As is the case with other BioLite products, technology is an essential part of the design. The 330-lumen lamp projects light up to nearly 250 feet in front of you. There are variable lighting settings, too: You can opt for either a white spot or floodlight, both with dimming options, or a strobe light feature; there's also a red floodlight. It can run for three and a half hours at maximum brightness or 40 hours at minimum brightness, and when it needs to be recharged, you can just plug it into a micro-USB source like a solar panel or powerbank.

Get your own BioLite Headlamp for $49 on Amazon. It's available in in ember red, ocean teal, sunrise yellow, or midnight gray.

Teal headlamp.
BioLite

Shanghai Is Now Home to the World’s Longest 3D-Printed Bridge

World's largest 3D-printed bridge in Shanghai, China.
World's largest 3D-printed bridge in Shanghai, China.
Tsinghua University

Small items like toys and shoes aren't the only things 3D printers can make. As a team of architects from China's Tsinghua University School of Architecture recently demonstrated, the machines can be used to print sturdy bridges large enough to span waterways.

As dezeen reports, at 86 feet in length, the new pedestrian bridge on a canal in Shanghai's Baoshan District is the longest 3D-printed bridge on Earth. Designed by the university's Zoina Land Joint Research Center for Digital Architecture (JCDA) and constructed by Shanghai Wisdom Bay Investment Management Company, it consists of 176 concrete units. The parts were printed from two robotic-arm 3D-printing systems over 19 days.

The 3D-printing technology cut down on costs as well as construction time. According to Tsinghua University, the project cost just two-thirds of what it would have using conventional materials and engineering methods.

Even though their approach was futuristic, the architecture team paid homage to a much older bridge in a different part of the country. The new bridge's arched structure is inspired by that of the 1400-year-old Anji Bridge in Zhaoxian, the oldest standing bridge in China (and the world's oldest open-spandrel arch bridge).

The bridge in Shanghai may be the longest 3D-printed bridge in the world, but it isn't the first. Last year, a 3D-printed steel bridge was unveiled in Amsterdam.

[h/t dezeen]

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