CLOSE
The LEGO Group
The LEGO Group

Take a Virtual Peek Inside Denmark's New LEGO House

The LEGO Group
The LEGO Group

Grown-ups who wanted to live inside the LEGO-brick homes they built as a kid can now simulate the experience by visiting the Danish toy brand’s brand-new LEGO House in the company's hometown of Billund, Denmark.

As My Modern Met reports, the experiential playhouse opened its doors to LEGO loving fans of all ages on September 28, following seven years of planning and a four-year construction period. Danish architecture firm BIG designed the nearly 130,000-square-foot playhouse’s exterior to resemble a stack of 21 plastic bricks, with multi-colored rooftop terraces.

The LEGO House contains an official LEGO history museum as well as a Masterpiece Gallery area, featuring elaborate LEGO designs by fans around the world. It also features four color-coded playrooms—each designed to nurture a specific facet of play and learning—and three eateries, including the Mini Chef family restaurant, where customers can build their own orders out of bricks and have the real-life thing served on a conveyer belt by dancing robots.

“With LEGO House, we celebrate creativity and the strength of learning through play,” LEGO owner Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen said in a statement. “When they play, children learn the basic skills that they need, such as creativity, collaboration, and problem-solving abilities.”

The LEGO House is expected to have over 250,000 paid visitors per year, although fans can visit the site’s rooftop playgrounds, shop in the LEGO store, or dine at any of its restaurants without paying an entrance fee. Access to the house’s experiential zones costs around $31, and visits must be booked in advance through the LEGO House website due to space restrictions.

Check out some photos of the LEGO House below:

Facade of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark
Facade of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark
The LEGO Group

Aerial rooftop view of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark.
Aerial rooftop view of the LEGO Group's new LEGO® House in Billund, Denmark.
The LEGO Group

LEGO House visitors browse the Masterpiece Gallery, a display of works by members of the brand's artistic community.
LEGO House visitors browse the Masterpiece Gallery, a display of works by members of the brand's artistic community.
The LEGO Group

Oversize LEGO model sits on a LEGO House terrace in Billund, Denmark.
Oversize LEGO model sits on a LEGO House terrace
The LEGO Group

Children play near the Brick Builder Waterfall at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
Children play near the Brick Builder Waterfall at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
The LEGO Group

Children build LEGO flowers to plant in a special LEGO meadow at the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark.
Children build LEGO flowers to plant in a special LEGO meadow.
The LEGO Group

Kids visiting the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark, play with LEGOs in the World Explorer section, which has three themed islands filled with LEGO mini-figures.
Kids play with LEGOs in the World Explorer section, which has three themed islands filled with LEGO mini-figures.

The LEGO Group

At the MINI CHEF family restaurant, located inside the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark, customers build their own order out of LEGO bricks  and have them served by dancing robots.
The MINI CHEF family restaurant, where customers build their own order out of LEGO bricks and have them served by dancing robots.
The LEGO Group

[h/t My Modern Met]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Dan Bell
arrow
Design
A Cartographer Is Mapping All of the UK’s National Parks, J.R.R. Tolkien-Style
Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park
Dan Bell

Cartographer Dan Bell makes national parks into fantasy lands. Bell, who lives near Lake District National Park in England, is currently on a mission to draw every national park in the UK in the style of the maps in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Kottke.org reports.

The project began in September 2017, when Bell posted his own hand-drawn version of a Middle Earth map online. He received such a positive response that he decided to apply the fantasy style to real world locations. He has completed 11 out of the UK’s 15 parks so far. Once he finishes, he hopes to tackle the U.S. National Park system, too. (He already has Yellowstone National Park down.)

Bell has done various other maps in the same style, including ones for London and Game of Thrones’s Westeros, and he commissions, in case you have your own special locale that could use the Tolkien treatment. Check out a few of his park maps below.

A close-up of a map for Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park in central England
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Cairngorms National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Cairngorms National Park in Scotland
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Lake District National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Lake District National Park in England
Dan Bell

You can buy prints of the maps here.

[h/t Kottke.org]

All images by Dan Bell

nextArticle.image_alt|e
The North Face
arrow
Design
The North Face's New Geodesic Dome Tent Will Protect You in 60 mph Wind
The North Face
The North Face

You can find camping tents designed for easy set-up, large crowds, and sustainability, but when it comes to strength, there’s only so much abuse a foldable structure can take. Now, The North Face is pushing the limits of tent durability with a reimagined design. According to inhabitat, the Geodome 4 relies on its distinctive geodesic shape to survive wind gusts approaching hurricane strength.

Instead of the classic arching tent structure, the Geodome balloons outward like a globe. It owes its unique design to the five main poles and one equator pole that hold it in place. Packed up, the gear weighs just over 24 pounds, making it a practical option for car campers and four-season adventurers. When it’s erected, campers have floor space measuring roughly 7 feet by 7.5 feet, enough to sleep four people, and 6 feet and 9 inches of space from ground to ceiling if they want to stand. Hooks attached to the top create a system for gear storage.

While it works in mild conditions, the tent should really appeal to campers who like to trek through harsher weather. Geodesic domes are formed from interlocking triangles. A triangle’s fixed angles make it one of the strongest shapes in engineering, and when used in domes, triangles lend this strength to the overall structure. In the case of the tent, this means that the dome will maintain its form in winds reaching speeds of 60 mph. Meanwhile, the double-layered, water-resistant exterior keeps campers dry as they wait out the storm.

The Geodome 4 is set to sell for $1635 when it goes on sale in Japan this March. In the meantime, outdoorsy types in the U.S. will just have to wait until the innovative product expands to international markets.

[h/t inhabitat]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios