Feeling Antisocial? Your Immune System Might Be to Blame

iStock
iStock

When you're feeling under the weather, there's a reason you'd rather stay in and watch a movie alone than visit a theater with friends. And it isn't necessarily due to your nagging cough, or because you'd be forced to put on pants: As the SciShow's Hank Green explains in the video below, our immune systems—which are connected to our brains—may affect our social behavior.

The brain is linked to the immune system through the vagus nerve, a vast network of fibers that connects to parts of our body like the gut or lymph nodes. This nerve can detect compounds called cytokines, which control various inflammatory responses. Your immune system releases cytokines when you're battling an illness, and your brain can sense them through this complex communication chain, resulting in you becoming more withdrawn.

Learn more about the science of why you feel like flying solo on sick days—and on the flip side, how some immune responses can make some people more social—by watching the video below.

Study Finds Hot Baths May Be as Effective as Exercise in Helping Depression

iStock.com/karelnoppe
iStock.com/karelnoppe

Though some dermatologists believe showers can be better for your skin by helping it to retain some naturally occurring oils, baths are still symbolic of relaxation. Luxuriating in standing water provides a break in routine and allows people to unwind.

Now, scientists may have found evidence that there’s a more substantial benefit to bathing: It might actually help alleviate depression.

In a study [PDF] out of Freiburg University in Germany and published by the preprint repository bioRxiv, 45 subjects with moderate to severe depression as measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) were instructed to either exercise for 45 minutes twice each week or take 30-minute hot baths (at 104°F) and then relax with hot water bottles and a warm blanket for 20 minutes twice a week. The subjects were then retested with HAM-D after eight weeks. Those who bathed reported a six-point drop in their score, which averaged 21.7 on a scale of 1 to 50 at the outset. Exercise patients saw only a three-point drop.

There are some significant caveats to this study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed. In addition to the sample size being small, 13 of the 23 people assigned to the exercise group failed to complete the study because they were unable or unwilling to continue physical activity.

Some researchers suggest that soaking can address one's mood by helping to normalize a person’s body temperature and circadian rhythms, which help regulate the sleep-wake cycle. (The hot water bottles provided a continued spike in body temperature.) A 2017 study led by the University of Madison-Wisconsin demonstrated that regularly raising a individual's core temperature to 101.3°F led to a 4.27-point reduction in the HAM-D score after six weeks (though the findings from the small-scale study were controversial).

While it’s too early to conclude whether hot baths should be a prescription for depression, or that their benefits are equal to those of exercise, they have almost no side effects and are likely to result in more adherence than an exercise regimen.

[h/t New Scientist]

Fart All You Want—These 'Flatulence Jeans' Were Designed to Absorb the Smell

Shreddies
Shreddies

Like it or not, everyone farts, and they do it far more than you’d think. Healthy people pass gas up to 20 times a day, and, as we recently learned, even if you try to hold your farts in, they’ll come out one way or the other—possibly through your mouth. Depending on what you eat and where you pass it, that can get pretty smelly. That is, unless you’re wearing fart-proof pants. A UK-based company called Shreddies makes “flatulence filtering” jeans that promise to eliminate your worst smells before they can escape into the wider world, Business Today reports.

Shreddies products are lined with activated charcoal, a substance that’s great at absorbing odors and gases—so much so that it’s a go-to ingredient for home air filters and purifiers. According to Shreddies, the odor-absorbing qualities of the fabric last around two to three years, at which point you’d probably be buying new jeans, anyway.

A shirtless man wearing Shreddies jeans
Shreddies

You still have to mind your farts, though. The company says that to be effective, the jeans have to fit tightly against the skin, ensuring that your gas is absorbed directly into the fabric. “To avoid flatulence escaping around the filter we recommend that you stand with your legs together and try to let your wind out slowly,” the Shreddies website instructs (emphasis theirs). “When sitting, keep your knees together so that flatulence escapes through the carbon panel.” As long as the jeans fit correctly, the filter should absorb all the foul odors leaking out of your body.

The jeans, available for men and women, cost roughly $130 (£100) plus shipping, a price that probably seems worth it to the people in your life who have to deal with your noxious toots.

Not a jeans person? Fear not. The company also makes fart-filtering underwear and pajamas. There are gift options, too, for all of your favorite flatulence-prone friends.

[h/t Business Today]

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