Welsh Designer Spends Months Turning His Resume Into a LEGO Minifig

There are a lot of creative resumes out there, from a CV designed as a working online video game to a Pinterest job application that looked exactly like the website. For his latest resume, recent design school grad Andy Morris turned his likeness into a toy, as we learned from Lost at E Minor.

Morris, a Welsh designer and artist whose past exhibition Little Big Art recreated famous pieces of art in LEGO, decided to make himself into a unique Andy Morris LEGO minifigure.

The LEGO version of Andy comes in a box that lists Morris as a 34-year-old designer. The back side of the package—designed to look just like what an actual LEGO minifig might come in—contains a brief cover letter with more information about him and his qualifications, including that his art exhibitions have broken gallery attendance records. The minifig itself wears a flat cap and carries a miniature plastic laptop and a teeny tiny CV sheet.

The back side of a mock-LEGO minifig package.

Morris spent two months gathering all the separate LEGO pieces to make a minifig that looked like him, and now has enough to make 100 individual figures to send out to potential employers.

“While conventional CVs are great for conveying past accomplishments, they’re limited on what personality, creativity, and innovation you can inject into them,” Morris tells Mental Floss. “Plus, who doesn’t want to receive some LEGO through the post!”

Morris isn't the only person to turn to the brick-like toys for resume help. In 2014, an internship seeker used LEGO’s Digital Designer to create a LEGO version of herself at Miniland scale to pitch her skills, for instance. (Yes, she got the gig.)

As for Morris, his job application is sure to stand out by serving as a pretty good desk toy.

[h/t Lost at E Minor]

All images by @shotbygoldcut

Hundreds of Kangaroos Roam the Green at This Australian Golf Course

burroblando/iStock via Getty Images
burroblando/iStock via Getty Images

Anglesea Golf Club has all the makings of a regular golf club: an 18-hole golf course, a mini golf course, a driving range, a clubhouse, and a bistro. But the kangaroo mobs that hop around the holes add an element of surprise to your otherwise leisurely round of one of the slowest games in sports.

Person takes photo of a kangaroo
Anglesea Golf Club

According to Thrillist, the kangaroos have been a mainstay for years, and the club started giving tours a few years ago to ensure visitors could observe them in the safest way possible. For about 25 minutes, a volunteer tour guide will drive a golf cart with up to 14 passengers around the course, sharing fun facts about kangaroos and stopping at opportune locations for people to snap a few photos of the marsupials, which are most active in late afternoon and early morning. Kangaroos are friendly creatures, but Anglesea’s website reminds visitors that “they can also be quite aggressive if they feel threatened.”

Post-graduate students and academic staff from Melbourne University’s zoology department have been researching Anglesea’s kangaroo population since 2004, and some of the animals are marked with collar and ear tags so the researchers can track movement, growth, survival, and reproduction patterns throughout their life cycle.

One of the reasons kangaroos have continued to dwell on land so highly trafficked by people is because of the quality of the land itself, National Geographic reports. The golf course staff regularly sprinkles nitrogen fertilizer all over the green, which makes the grass especially healthy.

Kangaroos graze on Anglesea Golf Course
Anglesea Golf Club

If you decide to plan a trip to Anglesea Golf Club, you can book a kangaroo tour here—adult tickets are $8.50, and children under 12 can come along for just $3.50 each.

[h/t Thrillist]

From Downton Abbey to Friends: How Much Your Favorite TV Homes Would Cost In Real Life

If you've ever wanted to live like the lords and ladies of Downton Abbey, you'd better be prepared to shell out some serious cash. With 61 bedrooms to accommodate the Abbey's many residents—not to mention the regular procession of notable house guests (and the occasional group of convalescing soldiers)—£137 million, or $173.9 million, for Downton Abbey's grand estate almost seems like a steal.

If you're really serious about buying Tony Soprano's spread, you can: the North Caldwell, New Jersey home hit the market earlier this year with an asking price of $3.4 million (despite the fact that, as global construction supplier Burton Roofing points out, comparable houses in the area tend to sell for about half that price).

But living like the characters in your favorite TV series doesn't have to cost a fortune. To prove it, Burton Roofing crunched the numbers to determine just how much your favorite television homes would cost in real life, in case you want to start socking away for that down payment. (If you're thinking about taking up residence in Walter White's cozy Albuquerque abode from Breaking Bad, just be prepared to budget in a little extra for what it will take to clean all those fan-thrown pizzas off the roof.)

show homes infographic
Burton Roofing

show homes infographic \
Burton Roofing

show homes infographic
Burton Roofing

show homes infographic
Burton Roofing

show homes infographic
Burton Roofing

show homes infographic
Burton Roofing

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