This Eco-Friendly Branding Can Cut Ink Usage in Half

Courtesy of Ecobranding
Courtesy of Ecobranding

When it comes to consumer goods, branding is everything. Apple’s little half-chewed fruit logo represents decades of innovation; the Golden Arches promise a reliably consistent fast-service dining experience. But because these logos are so ubiquitous, appearing on everything from cups to boxes, they can use up a tremendous amount of ink, which can have an adverse impact on the environment.

According to Adweek writer Tim Nudd, a solution is out there. Ecobranding, a Paris-based design project, can transform iconic company logos into ink-saving illustrations. By making the McDonald’s arches just slightly less solid, printers could use 34 percent less ink. Putting a little empty space in Nike’s “swoosh” logo would cut its ink usage down by 24 percent.

Brand logos are re-designed to use less link
Courtesy of Ecobranding

Reducing inks on these materials reduces a printer’s environmental footprint by lessening the chemical waste—including airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—created as a result of mass production [PDF]. Better yet, it’s also more economically appealing for companies that print coffee cups or other materials in the millions. Ecobranding is hoping these trial designs will catch the attention of brands looking to conserve resources: Taking a bigger bite out of Apple’s apple could be a win for everyone.

[h/t Adweek]

The World’s First Film Poster Is Up for Auction in London

Sotheby's
Sotheby's

Cinephiles, get your wallets out. Historic posters for some of the world’s most famous films are going up for sale as part of an upcoming auction at Sotheby’s London, including a rare promotional poster designed for the first-ever film screening, The Guardian reports.

The “Original Film Posters Online” auction is your chance to own a Henri Brispot-designed Cinématographe Lumière poster, advertising the first admission-based public film screening. The Lumière brothers’s December 1895 event at a Paris salon lasted approximately 20 minutes, showing off a number of the brothers’s short films using their specially made camera-projector, the cinématographe. The poster is worth an estimated $60,000 to $77,000.

A poster titled Cinema Lumiére shows an illustration of patrons milling around a cafe.
Lot 44 Cinématographe Lumière (1896) poster, French (est. £40,000-60,000)
Sotheby's

The auction also includes original posters for movies like Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Star Wars, 2001: A Space Odyssey, several James Bond movies, and King Kong. The array features signed posters, painted advertisements for silent-era films, and concept art, ranging in price from around $650 to almost $77,000. The Lumière brothers poster is the most valuable lot on offer.

The bidding opens on August 28. You can see all the items up for auction here or on display in London throughout this month.

[h/t The Guardian]

National Portrait Gallery Celebrates Aretha Franklin With Week-Long Exhibition

Courtesy of Angela Pham BFA
Courtesy of Angela Pham BFA

With the passing of Aretha Franklin on August 16, 2018, the world has lost one of its most distinctive voices—and personalities. As celebrities and fans share their memories of the Queen of Soul and what her music meant to them, the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery will pay tribute to the legendary songstress's life with a week-long exhibition of her portrait.

Throughout her career, Franklin earned some of the music industry's highest accolades, including 18 Grammy Awards. In 1987, she became the first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Nearly 30 years later, in 2015, the National Portrait Gallery fêted Franklin with the Portrait of a Nation Prize, which recognizes "the accomplishments of notable contemporary Americans whose portraits reside in the National Portrait Gallery collection." (Madeline Albright, Spike Lee, and Rita Moreno are among some of its recent recipients.)

Milton Glaser's lithograph of Aretha Franklin, which is displayed at The National Portrait Gallery
© Milton Glaser

Franklin's portrait was the creation of noted graphic designer Milton Glaser, who employed "his characteristic kaleidoscope palette and innovative geometric forms to convey the creative energy of Franklin's performances," according to the Gallery. The colorful lithographic was created in 1968, the very same year that the National Portrait Gallery opened.

Glaser's image will be installed in the "In Memoriam" section of the museum, which is located on the first floor, on Friday, August 17 and will remain on display to the public through August 22, 2018. The Gallery is open daily from 11:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. and admission is free.

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