This Eco-Friendly Branding Can Cut Ink Usage in Half

Courtesy of Ecobranding
Courtesy of Ecobranding

When it comes to consumer goods, branding is everything. Apple’s little half-chewed fruit logo represents decades of innovation; the Golden Arches promise a reliably consistent fast-service dining experience. But because these logos are so ubiquitous, appearing on everything from cups to boxes, they can use up a tremendous amount of ink, which can have an adverse impact on the environment.

According to Adweek writer Tim Nudd, a solution is out there. Ecobranding, a Paris-based design project, can transform iconic company logos into ink-saving illustrations. By making the McDonald’s arches just slightly less solid, printers could use 34 percent less ink. Putting a little empty space in Nike’s “swoosh” logo would cut its ink usage down by 24 percent.

Brand logos are re-designed to use less link
Courtesy of Ecobranding

Reducing inks on these materials reduces a printer’s environmental footprint by lessening the chemical waste—including airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—created as a result of mass production [PDF]. Better yet, it’s also more economically appealing for companies that print coffee cups or other materials in the millions. Ecobranding is hoping these trial designs will catch the attention of brands looking to conserve resources: Taking a bigger bite out of Apple’s apple could be a win for everyone.

[h/t Adweek]

22 Whimsical Clear Phone Cases That Let You Show Off Your Favorite Art

Society6
Society6

It seems like Society6 is constantly coming up with more and more products that you can get emblazoned with your favorite artists' work. From notebooks to shower curtains, we're getting to a point where an entire apartment can be covered in artful sloths. And so can your phone.

The art print site's clear iPhone cases are transparent and incorporate the look of the phone underneath into the design. Often, the patterns look like stickers, but with the advantage of never peeling. The protective cases come in two versions: slim (a frosted plastic case) or tough (a two-piece, impact resistant case) and are available for $36 for iPhone 6 and later.

We collected all our favorite designs to give you a quick look at what's available.

1. WITCHCRAFT

2. BANANA!!

3. MY SLEEPY PET

4. FRIDA KAHLO

5. PUG YOGA

6. UNICORN LAND

7. NATURE WALKS

8. SNEAKY CAT

9. CACTUS OUTFIT

10. FLY ME TO THE MOON

11. GOLDEN CELESTIAL BUGS

12. HAMMERHEADS

13. I SHOW YOU THE STARS

14. FOR THE TREES

15. SKELETON

16. GREEN AND BLACK GARDEN WITH RED FLOWERS

17. CAT'S EYES

18. BABY AXOLOTL

19. SOLAR SYSTEM

20. BEAR GARDEN

21. TRICKSTERS

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

A version of this story first ran in 2017. It has been updated to reflect current availabilty.

Boston-Area Students Convince their City to Install 3D Crosswalks

iStock.com/olaser
iStock.com/olaser

Motorists driving through Medford, Massachusetts may notice something unusual on the street outside Brooks Elementary School. On April 22, the city installed a new pedestrian crosswalk painted to look like 3D objects raised from the ground. The new crossing path aims to make the intersection safer, and it's one of several set to debut around Medford, Curbed reports.

By painting additional, shaded shapes around the traditional white strips of a crosswalk, the city was able to create an optical illusion for drivers. From far away, the flat shapes look like blocks in the middle of the street. The effect is meant to make drivers slow down before they reach the crossing, and to make them more alert to pedestrians in the area.

Two students—a fourth- and a fifth-grader—worked with their teacher and the Brooks Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility to convince the city to add the safety feature. The 3D walkway, designed by Boston artist Nate Swain, will be painted outside three other elementary schools in the city.

Medford is the first city in the Boston area to experiment with 3D crosswalks, but the illusion has been used for years in other parts of the world. In 2016, Shakuntala Pandya and her daughter Saumya Pandya Thakkar designed their own version of the blocks for a highway in Ahmedabad, India, and in Chicago, the crosswalks have been around for nearly a decade.

[h/t Curbed]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER