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Letting Eyewitnesses Sleep Could Make For More Accurate Testimony

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Despite what watching Law & Order might have taught you, eyewitness accounts of crimes are far from trustworthy. Human memory is fallible, and in fact, eyewitnesses are notoriously bad at providing accurate evidence. Misidentification by eyewitnesses has played a role in 70 percent of convictions overturned by DNA evidence in the U.S., according to the New York-based Innocence Project. But a new study suggests one way to help eyewitnesses provide more accurate evidence: sleep.

Published in the journal PLOS ONE and spotted by Futurity, the study finds that witness testimony is more accurate during police lineups if the person is well-rested.

In the study, Michigan State University students watched a video of a staged crime in which a man planted a bomb on a rooftop. They were then asked to look through several black-and-white lineups of six people, some of which included the perpetrator from the video, and some of which only had look-alike fillers. The participants had to wait 12 hours between watching the video and picking out the criminal from the lineup, but not all of them spent it the same way. Some watched the video in the morning and looked at the lineup at night, while others watched the video at night and then looked at the lineup in the morning, after they had slept.

The researchers found that when participants slept between seeing the “crime” and being presented with potential suspects, they were less likely to pick someone out of lineups that only included fillers. In other words, they were better able to reject innocent lookalikes, noting correctly that the perpetrator they had seen wasn’t present at all. People who had not slept misidentified an innocent person as the perpetrator 66 percent of the time compared to 42 percent of the people who had slept. That doesn’t seem like a huge difference, but even one misidentification in real life can have serious consequences for innocent people accused of crimes. The results track with existing research on sleep that has found that it plays an important role in cognitive processes like learning and memory.

However, sleep didn’t make the participants any better at identifying the correct suspect when he was in the lineup. Both groups could pick him out with about 50 percent accuracy. Essentially, sleep isn’t going to solve crimes, but it could help ensure that the wrong person doesn’t go to prison.

Previously, a 2016 study in Psychological Science found that it’s relatively easy for police to nudge witnesses into picking their prime suspect from a lineup by making sure that they’re the only person in the group with a particular distinguishing feature, like a beard. These unfair lineups not only resulted in misidentification, but participants who chose from them were more confident about their (incorrect) choice than people who saw more fair lineups.

Taking a long nap isn’t the only way to improve lineup accuracy. The criminal justice advocates at the Innocence Project recommend several methods to make sure that witness testimony is more accurate, such as making sure that the people shown in the lineups all roughly match the description of suspect (beard and all), having the lineup administered by an officer who doesn’t know which person in the lineup is the police’s suspect, and making sure the witnesses know that the perpetrator might not be in the lineup at all, and that the investigation will continue even if they don’t pick anyone.

[h/t Futurity]

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Bad Moods Might Make You More Productive
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Being in a bad mood at work might not be such a bad thing. New research shows that foul moods can lead to better executive function—the mental processing that handles skills like focus, self-control, creative thinking, mental flexibility, and working memory. But the benefit might hinge on how you go through emotions.

As part of the study, published in Personality and Individual Differences, a pair of psychologists at the University of Waterloo in Canada subjected more than 90 undergraduate students to a battery of tests designed to measure their working memory and inhibition control, two areas of executive function. They also gave the students several questionnaires designed to measure their emotional reactivity and mood over the previous week.

They found that some people who were in slightly bad moods performed significantly better on the working memory and inhibition tasks, but the benefit depended on how the person experienced emotion. Specifically, being in a bit of a bad mood seemed to boost the performance of participants with high emotional reactivity, meaning that they’re sensitive, have intense reactions to situations, and hold on to their feelings for a long time. People with low emotional reactivity performed worse on the tasks when in a bad mood, though.

“Our results show that there are some people for whom a bad mood may actually hone the kind of thinking skills that are important for everyday life,” one of the study’s co-authors, psychology professor Tara McAuley, said in a press statement. Why people with bigger emotional responses experience this boost but people with less-intense emotions don’t is an open question. One hypothesis is that people who have high emotional reactivity are already used to experiencing intense emotions, so they aren’t as fazed by their bad moods. However, more research is necessary to tease out those factors.

[h/t Big Think]

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7 Reasons Why You Should Let Your Kid Get Bored This Summer
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No matter how excited kids are for summer break, after a few weeks without school, they can start to feel a little bored. But as a parent, you shouldn't drive yourself crazy scheduling playdates, lessons, and other organized activities for your restless progeny. Instead, turn off the iPad, put down the camp brochure, and let them sit around the house moaning “I'm bored”—it can be good for them.

1. BOREDOM PROMOTES CREATIVITY ...

Research suggests the experience of boredom can lead to greater creativity because it allows minds to wander. In one 2014 study, researchers asked a group of participants to undertake boring activities like copying down telephone numbers from a directory. Then, they were tested for creativity—they had to come up with as many uses for a pair of foam cups as they could think of. The participants who had endured the boring tasks ended up thinking up more uses for the cups than those who hadn't. Boredom, the researchers wrote, "can sometimes be a force for good."

This isn't an entirely new idea. Another study conducted in Canada in the 1980s provides further evidence that boredom isn't always a bad thing: It found that kids who lived in towns with no televisions scored higher on imagination-related tests than kids who had TVs. Imagine what disconnecting from all of the screens available now could do for a kid's creativity.

2. ... AND MAKES THEM MORE INDEPENDENT.

Boredom can force kids to generate their own ideas about what they'd like to do—and what's feasible—then direct their own activities independently. "If parents spend all their time filling up their child's spare time, then the child's never going to learn to do this for themselves," Lyn Fry, a child psychologist, told Quartz in 2016. "Being bored is a way to make children self-reliant."

3. BOREDOM FOSTERS PROBLEM SOLVING.

In The Boredom Solution: Understanding and Dealing with Boredom, teacher and author Linda Deal advises that it's important to let kids learn to deal with their boredom themselves because it helps them learn to make decisions about how to use their free time. They need to learn to "see the problem of boredom as one within their control," she writes, which can help them come up with constructive ways to solve it rather than simply getting hopeless or angry about it, as kids sometimes do in situations they don't have control over. Kids learn that boredom isn't an insurmountable obstacle.

4. IT MOTIVATES THEM TO SEEK NEW EXPERIENCES.

In a 2012 study published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, researchers sought to define what, exactly, boredom is. "At the heart of it is our desire to engage with the world or some other mental activity, and that takes attention," co-author Mark Fenske, an associate professor at the University of Guelph, explained at the time. "When we cannot do this—that seems to be what leads to frustration and the aversive state we call 'boredom.'" When kids (and adults) are bored, especially with activities that were once engaging, they're motivated to try new things.

5. BOREDOM CAN HELP THEM MAKE FRIENDS ...

According to a pair of psychologists from Texas A&M University, boredom might have a social role. They argue that it "expresses to others that a person is seeking change and stimulation, potentially prompting others to respond by assisting in this pursuit." Being bored can push kids to go out and be more social, and have fun through activities. When there's not much to do, hanging out with the new kid down the block (or even your little brother) suddenly seems a lot more appealing.

6. ... AND FIGURE OUT THEIR INTERESTS.

Both at school and at home, kids are often required to participate in a range of activities. Having the time and space to do nothing can help kids figure out what they actually like to do. "Children need to sit in their own boredom for the world to become quiet enough that they can hear themselves," psychologist Vanessa Lapointe writes at the Huffington Post. This downtime allows kids to direct their own activities without adult input. Pressed to come up with their own entertainment, they might discover a love of writing plays, baking cookies, biking, crafting, or perfecting their jump shot.

7. IT CAN HELP THEM FIND MEANING IN THEIR LIVES.

According to one 2011 study, boredom forced people to reflect on meaning in their lives, prompting them to seek out meaningful activities like donating blood. While the study only examined adults, who may be more inclined to search for purpose, boredom can nonetheless push kids to undertake activities they might otherwise find unappealing—whether that means helping out with the dishes or agreeing to go volunteer for the day—or could even inspire them to make the world a better place.

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