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Guy Hoffman
Guy Hoffman

This Cuddly Robot Can Help Teach Social Cues to Kids With Autism

Guy Hoffman
Guy Hoffman

When it sits still, Blossom resembles a handmade children's toy that's more basic than your average Barbie doll. But give it a moment and the soft, knitted body starts to move, bouncing and nodding in a way that doesn't make it seem any less warm and cuddly. Guy Hoffman of Cornell University designed Blossom to be a different type of robot, and he hopes his invention will eventually act as a social companion for kids with autism, Co.Design reports.

Kids who fall on the autism spectrum can have trouble picking up social cues like body language and facial expressions. Blossom could be used to demonstrate these interactions in an approachable way. Partnering with Google, Hoffman engineered his robot to watch YouTube videos and physically respond to the action on screen. By designing Blossom to detect and react to certain emotions, the idea is that it will teach the kids watching alongside it by example.

Hoffman understood that design is a crucial part of building an empathy robot. Instead of rigid metal, the skeleton is made from soft materials like rubber bands and silicon that make for imperfect, lifelike movements. The elements that are visible from the outside, like wooden ears and knitted wool, were chosen for their warmth and familiarity. Depending on how you dress it up, Blossom resembles a cat, a bunny, or an octopus.

Many of the items that make the device can be found around the household, and that's intentional. The goal is for families to one day build Blossoms of their own and pass them down generation to generation.

The project is still in its early stages, and details on when it will be introduced to kids—and how effective it will be—aren't yet clear.

For now you can experience Blossom's unconventional cuteness in the video below.

[h/t Co.Design]

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Live Smarter
This AI Tool Will Help You Write a Winning Resume
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iStock

For job seekers, crafting that perfect resume can be an exercise in frustration. Should you try to be a little conversational? Is your list of past jobs too long? Are there keywords that employers embrace—or resist? Like most human-based tasks, it could probably benefit from a little AI consultation.

Fast Company reports that a new start-up called Leap is prepared to offer exactly that. The project—started by two former Google engineers—promises to provide both potential minions and their bosses better ways to communicate and match job needs to skills. Upload a resume and Leap will begin to make suggestions (via highlighted boxes) on where to snip text, where to emphasize specific skills, and roughly 100 other ways to create a resume that stands out from the pile.

If Leap stopped there, it would be a valuable addition to a professional's toolbox. But the company is taking it a step further, offering to distribute the resume to employers who are looking for the skills and traits specific to that individual. They'll even elaborate on why that person is a good fit for the position being solicited. If the company hires their endorsee, they'll take a recruiter's cut of their first year's wages. (It's free to job seekers.)

Although the service is new, Leap says it's had a 70 percent success rate landing its users an interview. The rest is up to you.

[h/t Fast Company]

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NASA/JPL, YouTube
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Space
Watch NASA Test Its New Supersonic Parachute at 1300 Miles Per Hour
NASA/JPL, YouTube
NASA/JPL, YouTube

NASA’s latest Mars rover is headed for the Red Planet in 2020, and the space agency is working hard to make sure its $2.1 billion project will land safely. When the Mars 2020 rover enters the Martian atmosphere, it’ll be assisted by a brand-new, advanced parachute system that’s a joy to watch in action, as a new video of its first test flight shows.

Spotted by Gizmodo, the video was taken in early October at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Narrated by the technical lead from the test flight, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Ian Clark, the two-and-a-half-minute video shows the 30-mile-high launch of a rocket carrying the new, supersonic parachute.

The 100-pound, Kevlar-based parachute unfurls at almost 100 miles an hour, and when it is entirely deployed, it’s moving at almost 1300 miles an hour—1.8 times the speed of sound. To be able to slow the spacecraft down as it enters the Martian atmosphere, the parachute generates almost 35,000 pounds of drag force.

For those of us watching at home, the video is just eye candy. But NASA researchers use it to monitor how the fabric moves, how the parachute unfurls and inflates, and how uniform the motion is, checking to see that everything is in order. The test flight ends with the payload crashing into the ocean, but it won’t be the last time the parachute takes flight in the coming months. More test flights are scheduled to ensure that everything is ready for liftoff in 2020.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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