Wireless Recording Device Captures Studio-Quality Songs on the Go

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iStock

When they aren’t near a studio, some musicians settle for recording snippets of songs on their smart phones during the writing process. Spire Studio offers a better way: Small enough to fit inside a purse, the recording device allows artists to record and mix professional-grade tracks without stepping foot inside a recording booth.

According to Fast Company, Spire Studio is a new product from iZotope, a Massachusetts-based company that’s been in the recording business for more than 15 years. The sleek, cylindrical gadget is designed to be a modern tool for making music. Using it is simple, with a button for one-touch recording and a studio-quality microphone built in. It automatically adjusts levels for a smoother sound and gives musicians the choice to layer tracks on top of one another.

Once the actual music has been captured, users can move to the Spire Studio app to edit it. The device wirelessly connects to a smartphone where mixing and polishing tracks is easy even for a beginner to do. And if a friend wants to improve upon the song further, the file can easily be shared for them to play with it.

Spire Studio is designed to be accessible to musicians of all experience levels, but that’s no reason for serious recording artists look down upon it. Some professional bands, including The Ultramods and Gorillaz, have composed entire albums using nothing but iPad apps. Songwriters looking to graduate past the Voice Memos app on their phone can purchase Spire Studio for $350 when it hits the market this fall.

[h/t Fast Company]

Watch an AI-Powered Robot Take the Fun Out of 'Where's Waldo'

YouTube
YouTube

"There's Waldo" is the name of an AI-powered robot that has been trained to swiftly suck all the fun out of the beloved children's books. As Popular Mechanics reports, the robot can pick Waldo's pom-pom beanie and striped shirt out of a crowd in just 4.45 seconds, "which is better than most 5-year-olds," according to the robot's maker.

Built by creative agency Redpepper, the robot is linked to Google's AutoML Vision service, which was fed 107 photos of Waldo from Google Images.

"I thought that wouldn't be enough data to build a strong model, but it gives surprisingly good predictions on Waldos that weren't in the original training set," Matt Reed, creative technologist at Redpepper, tells The Verge.

The robot's mechanical arm is equipped with a Vision Camera Kit, which lets it snap photos of the page and send them to AutoML Vision to be analyzed. Disconcertingly, the otherwise industrial-looking robot has a rubber hand that it uses to point to Waldo when it's at least 95 percent sure that the man on the page is, indeed, Waldo. Alas, once the machines take over, "Where's Waldo?" will just be one more phrase that future generations won't understand.

[h/t Popular Mechanics]

How to Rig Your Android Phone to Play Old Floppy Disk Games

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iStock

Owning a smartphone means you have thousands of games at your fingertips, but capturing the nostalgia of playing a game saved on a floppy disk isn't as simple as downloading an app. Reviving floppy disk games for the smartphone era is a bit more complicated, and YouTube vintage video game reviewer LGR shows you just how to do it step by step.

In this video, spotted by Kotaku, LGR takes an old floppy disk, the same kind you used in your computer class at school, and uses it to play a classic video game on a smartphone. This is made possible with an Android phone, a USB connector, an Android USB adaptor, and a portable floppy disk drive that's about as big as the phone itself. (The hardware doesn't work for iPhones, but if you're an Apple user there are plenty of ways to play old PC games online).

Just inserting the disk into the drive when it's connected to your phone isn't enough to start playing: You need to download a special app that mimics Microsoft's old disk operating system, like Magic Dosbox, for example. Once you have that on your phone, you can use it to open whatever game is saved to your floppy disk.

Because old PC games weren't made for touchscreens, the smartphone gameplay can be a little be a little awkward—but if you're willing to hook a floppy disk drive up to your phone, convenience likely isn't your goal. You can watch LGR's full instructions in the video below.

[h/t Kotaku]

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