Flickr: Sue-W.
Flickr: Sue-W.

These Destroyed-Looking Buildings Are Actually Fine

Flickr: Sue-W.
Flickr: Sue-W.

All kinds of weird and terrible things can happen to a building during a natural disaster, but just because a building looks like it has gone through an earthquake, tornado, or even some type of bizarre wormhole doesn't mean the structure is unsound or that anything ever even happened to the building. In some cases, architects were merely taking a risk and designing structures that are only meant to look damaged. One example is Chile's Errante Guest House, seen above.

Perhaps some of the most famous examples of this concept are a few of the Ripley's Believe It or Not Museums around the country. It's hard to think of any building exterior that says "believe it or not" more than a functioning museum that looks like it has completely flipped over (complete with a car crushed under its weight).

You can see more buildings like this over at io9.

Primary image courtesy Flickr user Sue-W.

ICON, New Story
These $10,000 Concrete Homes Are 3D-Printed in Less Than 24 Hours
ICON, New Story
ICON, New Story

What makes housing so expensive? Labor costs, for one. According to a 2014 Census Bureau survey, the average single-family home takes about six months to construct, and that's a lot of man-hours. A new type of home from Austin, Texas-based startup ICON and the housing nonprofit New Story is hoping to change that. Their homes can be built from the ground up in 12 to 24 hours, and they cost builders just $10,000 to construct, The Verge reports.

ICON's construction method uses the Vulcan 3D printer. With concrete as the building material, the printer pipes out a structure complete with a living room, bedroom, bathroom, and porch that covers 600 to 800 square feet. That's a little less than the size of the average New York apartment and significantly larger than a typical tiny home.

The project, which was revealed at this year's SXSW festival in Austin, isn't the first to apply 3D printing to home construction. Moscow, Beijing, and Dubai are all home to structures assembled using the technology. What makes ICON and New Story's buildings remarkable is what they intend to do with them: Within the next 18 months, they plan to set up a community of 100 3D-printed homes for residents of El Salvador. If that venture is successful, the team wants to bring the printer to other places in need of affordable housing, including parts of the U.S.

ICON wants to eventually bring the $10,000 price tag down to $4000. The 3D-printed houses owe their affordability to low labor costs and cheap materials. Not only is cement inexpensive, but it's also sturdier and more familiar than other common 3D-printed materials like plastic. The simple structure also makes the homes easy to maintain.

“Conventional construction methods have many baked-in drawbacks and problems that we’ve taken for granted for so long that we forgot how to imagine any alternative,” ICON co-founder Jason Ballard said in a release. “With 3D printing, you not only have a continuous thermal envelope, high thermal mass, and near-zero waste, but you also have speed, a much broader design palette, next-level resiliency, and the possibility of a quantum leap in affordability."

After printing and safety tests are completed, the first families are expected to move into their new 3D-printed homes sometime in 2019.

[h/t The Verge]

At Long Last, Someone Bought Longaberger's Basket-Shaped Office

For more than 20 years, Newark, Ohio, has been home to what is likely the world's biggest picnic basket. Built in 1997, the former headquarters of The Longaberger Company is a seven-story architectural masterpiece made to look like the company’s signature woven picnic baskets. Unfortunately, not many other businesses want to work inside a picnic basket. The Longaberger Company has been trying to offload the office building since 2015, with few bites. Now, finally, someone has agreed to buy the building—towering handles and all.

At long last, someone bought the building in late 2017, according to Columbus Business First. Sadly, the oddly shaped building won't be going to a company that makes blankets or light snacks appropriate for eating on grassy lawns. The Louisville, Ohio-based developer Coon Restoration paid $1.2 million for the property, agreeing to pay the $800,000 in back taxes the Longaberger Company owes on it. The final price is a far cry from the $7.5 million it was once listed for, and even further away from the $32 million it took to build it in 1997 (that’s $49.4 million in 2018 dollars).

Coon Restoration owner Steve Coon has yet to reveal what he plans to do with the building, but he has said that he plans to renovate it, potentially to turn it into a mixed-use office building or a hotel. “I have a big vision in mind to bring it back to life and keep the Longaberger story alive,” Coon said in a statement regarding the sale. He has already hired Cleveland’s Sandvick Architects, designers who specialize in historic preservation, to work on the project. We can’t wait to see what they do with those handles.

[h/t Country Living]


More from mental floss studios