Coming to London Next Year: Frida Kahlo's Fashionable Clothes

In addition to being an artist and activist, Frida Kahlo—with her corsets, hand-embroidered silk skirts, and flower-adorned hair— was also a fashionista. Now, more than 60 years after the 47-year-old Mexican painter’s death in 1954, The Telegraph reports that the Victoria & Albert Museum in London is planning an exhibition dedicated to Kahlo’s eclectic sense of style.

Called Frida Kahlo’s Wardrobe, the exhibition is slated to run in 2018 from June 16 to November 4. Highlights will include the artist’s trademark Tehuana dress as well as paintings like My Dress Hangs There (1933); and hand-painted plaster corsets, which Kahlo—who was badly injured in a traffic accident when she was 18— wore to support her weakened spine.

Together, these statement pieces “will explore the development of Kahlo’s style as an amalgam of traditional Mexican garments, fashion from Europe and beyond, and demonstrate how her wardrobe was expressive of the complex relationship between her Mexican and Western heritage,” according to a press release for the exhibit. The museum calls its pairing of her wardrobe and self-portraits "unprecedented."

A self-portrait by Frida Kahlo shows her from the shoulders up.
Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Red and Gold Dress, 1941, Oil on canvas, 39 x 27.5 cm
© Gerardo Suter/ The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and The Vergel Foundation

In addition to Kahlo’s garments and accessories, the exhibition will also include personal items that provide context for some of the artist's sartorial choices, including orthopedic devices and medicines, prosthetics (Kahlo's leg was amputated shortly before her death due to surgery-induced gangrene), and photographs and letters.

Frida Kahlo’s Wardrobe is billed as the first exhibition outside Mexico to feature Kahlo’s clothing and personal items. After Kahlo’s death, her husband, the Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, locked away his late wife's belongings in a bathroom in their Mexico City home, requesting that it stay sealed until 15 years after his death. Rivera himself passed away three years later, but the room would remain shuttered far longer than his initial request. The Frida Kahlo Museum didn't began to catalog the hundreds of items inside until 2004. They’ve since been displayed within Mexico, but this will be their first appearance internationally.

[h/t The Telegraph]

Pantone’s 2019 Color of the Year is 'Sociable and Spirited' Living Coral

iStock.com/Thornberry
iStock.com/Thornberry

Goodbye violet, and hello coral. Pantone has named “Living Coral” its Color of the Year for 2019, but you still have the rest of the month to wear out this year’s shade of “Ultra Violet.”

The orange-pink hue (officially PANTONE 16-1546) is a response to an environment in flux and the human need to feel connected to other people, even as technology becomes more and more embedded in our daily lives, according to Pantone. "Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity,” the company writes on its website. “Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.”

As the world’s leading authority on color, Pantone’s picks for Color of the Year have been informing the worlds of interior decorating, fashion, graphic design, and other creative fields since 1999. The company’s Color Institute chose cerulean blue as its very first prediction for the year ahead (2000), according to the history section of Pantone’s website.

The intensive process of predicting the next color to take over the design world begins with noticing the hues that are starting to appear more prominently in new fashion lines, films, cars, art, and the streets of some of the world’s trendiest places, like London, Paris, and Milan.

In 2014, Leatrice Eiseman—executive director of the Pantone Color Institute—told Glamour that Pantone’s color experts are trained to look at “macro influences” around the world. “You can’t look just in the category that’s of specific interest,” Eiseman said. “You might manufacture clothing, but you have to know what’s happening in the bigger world around you so you know what color to choose.”

For those more interested in practical interior design trends than all-encompassing color schemes, paint brand Benjamin Moore has also revealed its color of the year for 2019. A cool gray hue (called Metropolitan AF-690) was chosen for the “calming role” it plays in our lives and our homes.

There’s a Snowman Hiding In These Snowflakes—Can You Spot It?

Gergely Dudás is a master of hidden image illustrations. The Hungarian artist, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his inventive designs, going all the way back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015.

In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. So what would the holiday season be without yet another Dudolf brainteaser? At first glance, his latest image (click on the post above to see a larger version) looks like a brightly colored field of snowflakes. But look closer—much, much closer—and you'll find a snowman hiding in there. Or you won't. But we promise it's there. (Dudolf has thoughtfully included a link to the solution on his Facebook page, so that you can either confirm your brilliance or just skip the brain strain altogether.)

If you like what you see here, Dudolf has an entire holiday-themed book of hidden images, Bear's Merry Book of Hidden Things: Christmas Seek-and-Find, which has been described as "Where’s Waldo? for the next generation." He also regularly posts new images to both his blog and Facebook page.

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