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What to Put in Your Go-Bag in Case of an Emergency

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From forest fires to floods, natural disasters have dominated the news of late. But even if your region hasn’t been afflicted by tropical storms or scorching flames, it’s always a smart idea to prepare for the worst while still hoping for the best. One way to stay safe in the midst of a sudden crisis is by packing a go-bag, an emergency carryall with just-in-case supplies. A go-bag’s contents will vary according to your own personal needs, but experts typically suggest including a few staple items.

We don’t recommend becoming a walking grocery store, but every go-bag should include at least a three-day food supply, and at least one gallon of water per person per day. That said, don’t just raid your pantry for leftover bags of chips or Lunchables and stash them in a duffel bag. Opt instead for healthy non-perishables, like pouches or cans of tuna and beans (don’t forget a manual can opener!) and protein or granola bars.

Pre-packaged nuts, trail mix, beef jerky, and peanut butter are other good options, as they’re packed with energy-boosting protein. You’ll also need plenty of water for both hydration and sanitation purposes, but if you don’t want to weigh down your pack with multi-gallon bottles, consider bringing water-purifying tablets, mini-filters, or a reusable water bottle equipped with a filter.

Additional go-bag items include a prepackaged first aid kit (customize it by adding your prescription medicines to the mix), an emergency whistle, a wrench or pliers (for turning off water valves, circuit boxes, and gas appliances), a flashlight and extra batteries, a battery- or hand-powered radio, and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert. These items are all likely available at your local big box outdoors store.

Other less obvious—but no less important—supplies include a dust mask (it helps filter contaminated air), plastic sheeting and duct tape (to construct a makeshift shelter), and wet wipes, trash bags, and plastic ties (to stay clean and hygienic in the absence of showers and routine garbage collection).

Cell phones can be just as useful in a crisis as they are for checking social media feeds, but you should pack some old-fashioned local maps along with extra chargers and phone batteries. That way, if you lose service, you won’t be stuck relying on a malfunctioning Google Maps page to find your way.

While shopping for your go-bag (it should be durable, yet lightweight), look for a large waterproof pouch to store money, credit cards, and essential documents, including copies of your passport and visas; your driver’s license; and your marriage, birth, adoption, and naturalization certificates. If you have pets or an older relative, you may also want to purchase and pack a second bag just for them.

While essential, these go-bag suggestions are by no means comprehensive. Feel free to add extra supplies, or tweak the ones above as needed. But since disasters can strike at any time, do consider packing three separate go-bags: one for home, one for work, and another for your car. Hopefully, you’ll never need them—but it’s always worth your peace of mind to have them.

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REM-Fit
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Stop Your Snoring and Track Your Sleep With a Wi-Fi Smart Pillow
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REM-Fit

Everyone could use a better night's rest. The CDC says that only 66 percent of American adults get as much sleep as they should, so if you're spending plenty of time in bed but mostly tossing and turning (or trying to block out your partner's snores), it may be time to smarten up your sleep accessories. As TechCrunch reports, the ZEEQ Smart Pillow improves your sleeping schedule in a multitude of ways, whether you're looking to quiet your snores or need a soothing lullaby to rock you to sleep.

After a successful Kickstarter in 2016, the product is now on sale and ready to get you snoozing. If you're a snorer, the pillow has a microphone designed to listen to the sound of your snores and softly vibrate so that you shift positions to a quieter pose. Accelerometers in the pillow let the sleep tracker know how much you're moving around at night, allowing it to record your sleep stages. Then, you can hook the pillow up to your Amazon Echo or Google Home so that you can have your favorite smart assistant read out the pillow's analysis of your sleep quality and snoring levels the next morning.

The pillow is also equipped with eight different wireless speakers that turn it into an extra-personal musical experience. You can listen to soothing music while you fall asleep, either connecting the pillow to your Spotify or Apple Music account on your phone via Bluetooth or using the built-in relaxation programs. You can even use it to listen to podcasts without disturbing your partner. You can set a timer to turn the music off after a certain period so you don't wake up in the middle of the night still listening to Serial.

And when it's time to wake up, the pillow will analyze your movements to wake you during your lightest sleep stage, again keeping the noise of an alarm from disturbing your partner.

The downside? Suddenly your pillow is just another device with a battery that needs to charge. And forget about using it in a place without Wi-Fi.

The ZEEQ Smart Pillow currently costs $200.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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Learn to Tie a Tie in Less Than 2 Minutes
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For most men—and Avril Lavigne-imitators—learning to tie a tie is an essential sartorial skill. Digg spotted this video showing how you can tie one the simple way, with a tabletop method that works just as well if you’re going to wear the tie yourself or if you're tying it together for someone else who doesn't share your skills.

The whole technique is definitely easier to master while watching the video below, but here's a short rundown: As laid out by the lifehack YouTube channel DaveHax, the method requires you to lay the tie out on a table, folded in half as if you're about to loop it around your neck.

With the back of the tie facing up, you loop over each end, then twist the thinner of the two loops around itself so it ends up looking like a mini-tie knot itself. You'll end up nestling the two loops together and snaking the thin tail of the tie through the whole thing. Then, essentially all you have to do is pull, and you can adjust the tie as you otherwise would to put it over your head.

Unfortunately, this won't teach you how to master the art of more complicated neckwear styles like the fancier Balthus knot or even a bow tie, but it's a pretty good start for those who have yet to figure out even the simplest tie fashions.

[h/t Digg]

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