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Adventurous Drinkers Fall for ‘Cheese Tea’

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It’s normal for baristas to ask if you take your tea with milk or honey. But at a growing number of cafes around the world, they’ll want to know if you like it with a dollop of cheese on top. According to Food & Wine, cheese tea is slowly gaining popularity in the U.S.

The beverage originated in shops in Asia. To make it, baristas start by brewing a traditional tea variety like green tea. After that, the signature topping is added: What looks like harmless whipped cream is actually cheese that’s been blended into a light, fluffy state. The drinks can lean savory, with combos like white cheddar cheese and Himalayan pink salt, or they can fall on the sweeter side, like cream cheese and condensed milk.

Cheese tea can be found in China, Malaysia, and Taiwan, and it just recently began appearing on menus in the U.S. In late 2016, the Happy Lemon tea shop opened in Queens, New York, where customers can buy drinks topped with foam made from milk, whipped cream, or cream cheese and finished with rock salt. The Little Fluffy Head Cafe in downtown Los Angeles is the newest arrival to the American cheese tea scene. Along with their saltier options, they also make conventionally sweet, non-cheese toppings like creme brûlée cream with crushed Oreo.

If you don’t have a cheese tea cafe in your neighborhood, you’ll have no problem finding the trendy drink on Instagram where it's approaching Unicorn Frappuccino-level fame. Appreciating it from afar might also be the best option for people squeamish about drinking something that tastes like a cheese plate.

[h/t Food & Wine]

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Job Alert: The UK Needs a Chicken Nugget Taste-Tester

Do you like highly-processed chicken molded into mushy, breaded bites? Are you willing to relocate to England? Can your palate distinguish a savory nugget from a mediocre one? Your dream job awaits, AJC.com reports.

British retail chain B&M recently posted a job listing calling for a "chicken nugget connoisseur" to help the company get feedback on their new line of frozen food products. The chosen applicant—or applicants—will get a monthly voucher worth £25 ($34) to spend on frozen goods. Job duties consist of eating nuggets and other items and then providing B&M feedback.

The post describes the position as "temporary," so it's unlikely there's opportunity for advancement. If you care to apply, B&M will accept a paragraph describing yourself and why you’d be good for the job—though if you actually have a CV full of previous nugget-related positions, we're confident they'd love to see it.

[h/t AJC.com]

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Animals
Switzerland Just Made It Illegal to Boil Live Lobsters
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No, lobsters don’t scream when you toss them into a pot of boiling water, but as far as the Swiss government is concerned, they can still feel pain. The path most lobsters take to the dinner plate is supposedly so inhumane that Switzerland has banned boiling lobsters alive unless they are stunned first, The Guardian reports.

The new law is based on assertions from animal rights advocates and some scientists that crustaceans like lobsters have complex nervous systems, making death by boiling incredibly painful. If chefs want to include lobster on their menus, they’re now required to knock them out before preparing them. Acceptable stunning methods under Swiss law include electric shock and the “mechanical destruction” of the lobster’s brain (i.e. stabbing it in the head).

The government has also outlawed the transportation of live lobsters on ice or in icy water. The animals should instead be kept in containers that are as close to their natural environment as possible until they’re ready for the pot.

Proponents of animal rights are happy with the decision, but others, including some scientists, are skeptical. The data still isn’t clear as to whether or not lobsters feel pain, at least in the way people think of it. Bob Bayer, head of the University of Maine’s Lobster Institute, told Mental Floss in 2014 that lobsters “sense their environment, but don’t have the intellectual hardware to process pain.”

If you live in a place where boiling lobsters is legal, but still have ethical concerns over eating them, try tossing your lobster in the freezer before giving it a hot water bath. Chilling it puts it to sleep and is less messy than butchering it while it’s still alive.

[h/t The Guardian]

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