CLOSE
iStock
iStock

How to Make Slime With Glue

iStock
iStock

The well-stocked back-to-school section in most stores means one thing to most kids: The Elmer's glue shortage is officially over!

In 2016, school glue became a hot commodity when the "slime" craze hit classrooms across the U.S. With a simple mixture of glue, water, and a few other ingredients, kids can create a textured blob that's fun to knead, stretch, mold, and shape. Adding glitter, dye, and scented oils allows crafters to customize the sensory stuff to their liking, but that's just the beginning: Other additives can make slime magnetic, glow-in-the-dark, heat-responsive, and more.

But there's more to slime than glitter and eye-popping colors; there's a surprising amount of science behind the stuff. For starters, the substance is a non-Newtonian fluid, a liquid that doesn't conform to "normal" models of viscosity, meaning that its viscosity is affected by not temperature but force or stress. Making slime is a fantastic way for kids to experiment with the way non-Newtonian fluids act.

Then there's the science of how the glue reacts with other ingredients. Glue is a type of polymer, made of long chains of polyvinyl acetate molecules, which slide around and allow the glue to be squeezed out of the bottle. Adding Borax—also known as sodium borate or sodium tetraborate—to the mix results in cross-linking between the glue's protein molecules and the borate ions. The reaction links large molecules together, creating even bigger molecules that prevents them from sliding as easily and creates the slime texture. [PDF]

Though most of the original recipes included Borax, which is primarily used as a cleaning agent, reports quickly surfaced of kids suffering from serious chemical burns after submerging their hands in the substance for too long.

To avoid any mishaps, we've rounded up three of the best basic slime recipes that don't require the use of Borax. Grab the Elmer's while it's still on the shelves, and put a couple of these slime recipes to the test.

CONTACT LENS SOLUTION SLIME

After conducting their own tests to determine a safe way to create slime, Elmer's came up with a concoction that uses contact lens solution.

First, mix together 4 ounces of Elmer's white school glue with a 1/2 tablespoon of baking powder and a 1/2 tablespoon of baking soda. Knead the slime until you get your desired viscosity, adding drops of contact lens solution until you're happy with the result. Add dye, glitter, or other additives as desired.

CORNSTARCH SLIME

For slime that's less ooey-gooey and more fluffy-puffy, try a combination of a 1/2 cup of shampoo and a 1/4 cup of cornstarch. Add 1 tablespoon of water and stir. Mix in 5 more tablespoons of water, one tablespoon at a time, stirring well after each addition. If your slime is too sticky, knead in more cornstarch until you get it to a dough-like consistency.

SHAVING CREAM SLIME

Using shaving cream will give this version an extra fluffy feel. Mix a tablespoon of baking soda with just enough contact lens solution to cover it. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl, fold together a 1/2 cup of glue with a 1/2 cup of shaving cream. If you want colorful slime, add food coloring before folding. Add the baking soda solution and mix until putty-like. Knead the slime for about three minutes, then place in a sealed container. It should be ready to play with in an hour or two. 

nextArticle.image_alt|e
arrow
fun
Game Boy Will Be the Latest Classic Nintendo Console to Receive an Upgrade
Koisny, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In 2016, Nintendo delighted nostalgic gamers with the release of the NES Classic. The miniature console was too popular for its own good, selling out faster than stores could restock it. The success of the SNES Classic in fall 2017 proved that the retro console trend isn't limited to the NES. Now, peripheral manufacturer Hyperkin is revamping one of Nintendo's most iconic classic consoles before the Japanese gaming giant beats them to it. As Gizmodo reports, a new and improved Game Boy is currently in development.

Hyperkin announced the gadget, tentatively named the Ultra Game Boy, at this year's Consumer Electronics Show. It's modeled after the Game Boy Pocket and includes the same volume and contrast dials and 8-bit screen players remember.

But they will also notice some major upgrades. The body is made from sturdy aluminum, making it more resistant to dents and scratches if dropped. Hyperkin plans to add a third dial that will let users adjust the backlit LCD display, or they can turn it off completely if they want to play the way they did in 1996. Other new features include a built-in 6-hour battery, USB-C port for charging, and left and right audio output connections. Listening to mono sound through a fancy sound system may not make a big difference to most gamers, but the update will make it easier for musicians to use the console to create chiptunes.

The biggest feature that's missing is the built-in games aspect offered by the NES and SNES. Because the Ultra Game Boy is coming from Hyperkin, not Nintendo, users will need to provide the original cartridges to play it. But if you've been holding on to your game collection for the past 20 years, the new console may be a smart purchase. It's set to retail for less than $100 when it hits stores as anticipated in late summer 2018.

[h/t Gizmodo]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
LEGO
arrow
fun
Make Your Own Ship in a Bottle With a New LEGO Set
LEGO
LEGO

Building a ship in a bottle doesn’t need to be a stodgy affair, as LEGO’s latest release proves. LEGO Ideas is coming out with a new, 962-piece set called Ship in a Bottle based on the design of an Idaho-based fan named Jake Sadovich.

Sadovich spent three weeks designing his own version of a ship in a bottle using 1400 LEGO bricks before uploading images of the finished result to the LEGO Ideas site in November 2016. His project received the 10,000 supporters it needed to garner a review from the LEGO team in less than two months, and in August 2017, LEGO green-lit plans to build and sell an official set based on his design.

A product shot of a LEGO ship in a bottle against a white background
LEGO

Placed inside a bottle made of transparent bricks, the miniature ship boasts an outsize number of features for its 5-inch-long size, including three sails, six cannons, a crow’s nest, a compass (sorry, it isn’t a working one), and a flag. There's a wax-sealed cork built out of LEGO bricks, too, as well as small LEGO pieces designed to serve as the water beneath the ship.

“There was room to do some crazy building techniques and sneak in some elements in cool colors,” LEGO designer Tiago Catarino told the LEGO Ideas blog, so we expect the set to be a delight to put together. Hopefully, it won’t take you three weeks to build, though.

Some of the other fan-submitted LEGO Ideas projects the company has brought to life include a Women of NASA set, a LEGO version of the Beatles' Yellow Submarine, and a design for a fishing store.

The Ship in a Bottle set goes on sale February 1 and will cost $70.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER