What the First Year of Life Looks Like Through the Eyes of a Baby

iStock
iStock

A baby's vision undergoes a series of significant developments during its first year of life, and these developments have been visually replicated, month by month, in a recent video from Tech Insider.

The unfortunate news for any parent who has ever felt like their newborn was gazing into their eyes: Until the third month, babies can't actually identify facial features, which include eyes and mouths. Also, they can't focus their eyes on any subject more than 10 inches from their face for the first three months.

At the 6-month mark, babies are finally able to construct a 3D view of the world—something that later comes in handy at 9 months, when their eye-hand coordination is finally developed enough to grab hold of objects.

Though humans' eyes aren't fully developed until age 2, babies do have a leg up on adults in one area: A 2016 study found that babies between the ages of 3 and 4 months old can see slight differences in images caused by changes in illumination, while adults cannot.

Watch the video from Tech Insider below:

[h/t: Tech Insider]

21 Widespread Myths About Animals, Debunked

YouTube
YouTube

No, that nasty-looking wart on your finger didn't come from a toad. And yes, giraffes really do need more than 30 minutes of shut-eye in a day. Chances are that one of the "facts" you've come to know about your favorite animal isn't a fact at all. (Cats can swim and dogs do see colors—though in a different way than you probably do.)

Since our fuzzy, furry, finned, and winged friends can't always speak for themselves, Mental Floss Editor-in-Chief Erin McCarthy is here to clear up 21 widespread animal myths. So gather up your pets and check out this week's all-new edition of the Mental Floss List Show. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

17 Signs That You’d Qualify as a Witch in the 1600s

YouTube
YouTube

Are you a woman? Do you have a birthmark? Do you enjoy spending quality time with friends without a chaperone? You might just be a witch! At least that's how the thinking went in the 1600s, when now completely normal behaviors could have seen you accused of witchcraft.

Grab your broom and the pointiest black hat you can find, and join Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy as she shares 17 signs that might have branded you a witch during the 17th century in this week's all-new edition of the Mental Floss List Show. You can check out the full episode below:

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

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