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Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to Launch Mobile Interactive Art Museum

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Since not everyone in America has easy access to first-class culture, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts wants to bring it to them: As Smithsonian reports, the Richmond-based institution plans to launch an interactive mobile museum in fall 2018.

Called “VMFA on the Road,” the museum-on-wheels will visit rural schools, community centers, colleges, retirement homes, and small museums. At each stop, art lovers can enjoy lectures, distance learning opportunities, and rotating virtual reality tours of the museum's exhibitions.

The mobile museum is a modern offshoot of another VFMA initiative, the Artmobile, which was launched by the late architect and VMFA director Leslie Cheek Jr. From 1953 to 1994, the museum loaded tractor-trailers with works by artists like Monet, Rembrandt, and Picasso, and toured the state's remote areas to compensate for their lack of art institutions.

By the 1990s, the Artmobile program had swelled to include four high-tech Chevrolet tractor-trailers, each one laden with historic art treasures. Eventually, though, the VMFA discontinued its Artmobiles due to conservation and financial issues, including the challenges of protecting the artworks on the road.

As the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports, the VMFA's new traveling museum will be a specially designed, 53-foot Volvo tractor-trailer, paid for with corporate funds, foundation grants, and donations. It's been dubbed "Artmobile 2.0"—a fitting nickname for a high-tech take on a decades-old public service.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
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fun
There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

A hidden image illustration by Gergely Dudás, a.k.a. Dudolf
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

Gergely Dudás is at it again. The Hungarian illustrator, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his hidden image illustrations, going back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015. In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. For his latest brainteaser, which he posted to both his Facebook page and his blog, Dudolf is asking fans to find a pet ghost named Sheet in a field of white bunny rabbits.

As we’ve learned from his past creations, what makes this hidden image difficult to find is that it looks so similar to the objects surrounding it that our brains just sort of group it in as being “the same.” So you’d better concentrate.

If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding.

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Design
Graphic Design Series Shows Which Fonts Your Favorite Logos Use

Unless you’re a dedicated design geek, you probably can’t recognize the fonts used in the logos of some of the most recognizable companies in the world—even if you see them every day. Enter graphic designer Emanuele Abrate, whose latest project, Logofonts, illuminates the favorite fonts of the brands you see every day.

As we spotted on Adweek, Logofonts takes a logo—like, for instance, Spotify’s—and replaces the company’s name with the font in which it's written. Some fonts, like Spotify’s Gotham, might be familiar, while others you may never have heard of. Nike’s and Red Bull’s Futura is so commonplace in signage in logos that it’s the subject of an entire book called Never Use Futura. (Other companies that use it include Absolut Vodka and Domino’s Pizza, and many more.) But you most likely aren’t familiar with Twitter’s Pico or Netflix’s Bebas Neue.

Abrate is a managing partner at grafigata, an Italian blog and online academy focused on graphic design. In his work as a freelance designer, he focuses on logo design and brand identities, so it wasn’t hard for him to track down exactly which fonts each brand uses.

“When I see a logo, I wonder how it was conceived, how it was designed, what kind of character was used and why,” Abrate tells Mental Floss. The Logofonts project came from “trying to understand which fonts they use or which fonts have been modified (or redesigned) to get to the final result.”

The Nike logo reads 'Futura.'

The Twitter logo reads 'Pico.'

The Red Bull Logo reads 'Futura BQ.'

The Netflix logo reads 'Bebas Neue.'

You can check out the rest of the Logofonts project and Abrate’s other work on his Behance or Facebook pages, and on his Instagram.

[h/t Adweek]

All images courtesy Emanuele Abrate

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