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Stereokroma, Youtube

The Fascinating Science Behind How Neon Lights Are Made

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Stereokroma, Youtube

For almost 40 years, Gerald Collard of the Neon Family design studio in Montreal, has been hard at work crafting intricate neon signs of all shapes and sizes.

In its first 50 years as a documented art form, neon was considered a secret craft. Collard learned the ropes while studying under the benders at Claude Neon, the company of neon inventor George Claude.

In a recent episode of the Canadian series Oú Se Trouve by Stereokroma, Collard walked viewers through the step-by-step process of neon-making by building a pink "okay" sign. Among the interesting facts we learn: Not only is neon low-maintenance, but it can last up to 50 years, making it a desirable alternative for indoor lighting. Watch the full video below:

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History
A Brief History of Time
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iStock

You may have heard that time is a social construct, but that doesn’t stop it from having consequences in the real world. If you show up to a party 10 minutes before it’s scheduled to start, you’ll likely be the first one there, and if you arrive to an interview 10 minutes late, you likely won’t get the job. But how did humanity agree on when and how to observe certain times of day?

In their new video, the It’s Okay to Be Smart team explains how humans “invented” the modern concept of time. The increments we use to measure time, like seconds, minutes, and hours, come from the ancient civilizations of the Egyptians and the Babylonians. Early clocks, like sundials and water clocks, were pretty crude, so people couldn’t pinpoint a time like noon down to the second even if they wanted to. But as clocks became more accurate, the problem wasn’t being unable to tell time accurately, but deciding which clocks qualified as “accurate” in the first place.

In 1884, President Chester A. Arthur organized the International Meridian Conference with the intention of deciding on a uniform definition of time to be followed around the world. The attendees ended up choosing the meridian running through Greenwich, England as the official Prime Meridian, and all clocks would be measured against the clock in the town’s observatory. Greenwich Mean Time is still used as the standard world time today.

Check out the full story below.

[h/t It’s Okay to Be Smart]

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Melly Eats World
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Melissa Huang's Adorable Animal Macarons
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Melly Eats World
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Canadian baker Melissa Huang is inspired by all things adorable. Her macarons take up to six hours to make and come in a range of cute designs: There are sheep, pandas, chickens, and more. See more of Huang's cute creations on Instagram

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