Volkswagen Introduces Electric Version of Classic Microbus

Volkswagen
Volkswagen

Following the success of the compact Volkswagen Beetle, German automaker Volkswagen expanded its line in 1950 with the release of the Type 2. Customers preferred a less clinical name, opting to call it the camper, the bus, or the transporter. Able to tote mass quantities of counter-culture protesters, the Volkswagen bus became a symbol in antiwar movements of the 1960s before disappearing to the scrap heap of expired popular culture.

Recently, the company has doubled down on claims it would be revisiting it as a smaller vehicle. At a recent presentation at a Pebble Beach charity car expo, Volkswagen announced the bus—previously identified as the I.D. Buzz—would be returning in 2022 as a fully electric and consolidated version of the classic.

A look at the interior of the Volkswagen Microbus
Volkswagen

CEO Herbert Diess said that prototype versions of the vehicle on display at recent trade shows led to encouraging feedback that convinced the company to move forward. The I.D. Buzz is expected to have 369 horsepower, a considerable boost from the 25 of the original, and might implement self-driving elements. The concept car—which may or may not make it to roads with all of the same features—has a retractable wheel and movable seats when autonomy is engaged. The future of cars is looking more and more like a portable living room.

[h/t Inhabitat]

Email Regrets? Android Users Can Now Unsend Their Gmails

iStock
iStock

Users of America Online might remember an intriguing feature of the once-dominant internet portal: The ability to unsend email messages, so long as they remained unread by the recipient. It was the virtual equivalent of reaching into a snail mail box and retrieving an ill-advised or premature correspondence. The feature probably saved more than a few relationships and jobs from suffering permanent damage.

Popular mail service Gmail officially introduced a similar feature in 2015 for its desktop version, allowing users to open their Settings and opting in on an "Undo" feature that would give them up to 30 seconds to unsend an email. An iOS function followed. Now, The Next Web reports that Android users can benefit from the same do-over.

Once you've composed a message and hit "send," the app will notify you that you've got 10 seconds to change your mind. Tapping "Undo" will prevent Gmail from completing delivery, a welcome feature on phones that are prone to sending emails before you've finished due to a clunky touch screen interface.

If you're an Android user and don't see the feature, try updating Gmail to the latest version. Users who have spotted the feature aren't sure if all versions will be updated or if it's a slow rollout, so you might want to keep checking the app.

Don't use Gmail at all? Outlook also allows limited recall of messages, depending on which email provider you're using, and may allow you to tack on an apology note if you've accidentally sent something to the wrong recipient. Yahoo! users on Android and iOS can unsend emails, but they've only got three seconds to have a change of heart.

[h/t The Next Web]

GIPHY Is Launching the World's First All-GIF Film Festival

iStock
iStock

Think you’re a GIF master? GIPHY is looking to showcase the best in extremely short films with what it calls the world’s first GIF-only film festival, according to It’s Nice That. The GIF database and search engine company is teaming up with Squarespace to launch a contest dedicated to finding the best GIF-makers in America—the GIPHY Film Fest.

To enter your work for consideration in the festival, you’ll need an 18-second-or-less, looping film that tells a “compelling, creative, entertaining, professional-grade story,” according to the contest details. U.S.-based GIF artists can enter up to three mini-films in each of five categories: Narrative, Stop-Motion, Animated, Experimental, and Wild Card/Other. The films can have music (as long as you have the rights to use it) or be silent. All that matters is that they're between one and 18 seconds long.

The grand prize winner will receive $10,000, a five-year subscription to Squarespace (to host that amazing GIF on your website), and the chance to guest-curate an official Spotify playlist. All entries will be judged by a panel of professionals from across several creative industries, including film, animation, illustration, and design.

The GIPHY Film Fest is not the first uber-short film festival in existence. In 2013 and 2014, back when Vine still existed (RIP), the Tribeca Film Festival held a competition each year to find the best six-second films—a time limit that will make 18 seconds feel practically feature length.

Enter GIPHY’s contest here before the entry window closes on September 27, 2018. The winner will be announced on November 8, during a special New York City screening of each of the top films in each category.

[h/t It’s Nice That]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER