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Bates Motel Recap, Episode 7: "The Man in Number 9"

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This week on Bates Motel: Dead deputies, dead dogs and dead dreams. Ah, idyllic White Pine Bay. Having fun! Wish you were here!

An Unexpected Outcome to the Blame Game

This week picks up pretty much where last week left off: with Deputy Shelby leaking vital bodily fluids all over the Bates’ steps. Sheriff Romero has just arrived on the rainy scene and carefully walks over and takes the gun from Dylan’s hand. You know, the one with which he shot Deputy Shelby through the eyeball. Romero rolls Shelby over and quickly discovers the gaping eye socket.

“We’d better talk,” he says.

Romero and the dysfunctional family move inside to the living room, where Norma comes clean about everything, from Summers' murder to Shelby's sex trade. She sits back and sniffs, apparently ready to lie in whatever bed she’s made. Romero lets it all sink in for a second.

“Here’s what the story’s gonna be,” he announces, and Norma narrows her eyes in confusion. To save face, Romero says they’re going to tell the town that he had suspected Shelby was a corrupt cop for a while, stemming from Summers’ mysterious death. He was just starting to close in when Shelby tried to move the girl from Summers’ boat, which led to the showdown at Bates Motel, wherein Romero killed Shelby. To hammer this point home, he picks up the murder weapon and smears his prints all over it. Dylan’s gunshot wound, Romero continues, was sustained when he “got in the way.”

Everyone seems quite pleased by this unexpected development—except for Dylan, who can’t believe his heroic role in this whole ordeal has been humiliatingly downgraded.

“That’s it? I risked my life to save all your asses and take that guy down, and that’s it? I got in the way of his showdown?”

“That’s it!” Norma says gleefully, then hugs Norman instead of the son who saved all of their lives.

In Which Everyone Avoids Someone

After she spent an eternity (okay, an episode) avoiding him, Bradley and Norman are finally making out again, this time in his spartan bedroom. Bradley is worried about Norma overhearing, but Norman does. Not. Care.

“She’s never gonna hear us. Trust me,” he promises.

Of course, Norma bursts in two seconds later. “What are you doing?” she asks, and Norman pulls his face out of a pillow, revealing that’s he’s all alone.

Norma, totally oblivious to the fact that her son was just making out with goose feathers, starts blathering about how she adores the sound of the birds chirping outside, then flits over to his armoire. Does it really surprise you that she still picks out Norman’s clothes? I guess he’s lucky that she’s not still making him wear “Mommy’s Little Snuggler” onesies.

They have seven days until the motel officially opens, we learn, although the reservation book is still glaringly empty. Norma asks her son to fix the lattice under the porch before he leaves for school. Norman gets dressed—and I do believe the shirt his mother picked out is layered underneath his sweater—then goes to make the repair. He pulls off a piece of the lattice to reveal a dirty little dog angrily defending its territory underneath the porch. Norman throws it the rest of his breakfast. “Come here,” he says softly, hammer clenched somewhat alarmingly in his hand. “Come here. I won’t hurt you.” The dog skitters away.

Inside, Norma is making Dylan breakfast to show her appreciation for him getting shot and killing a cop and all. “You know I’m still moving out, right?” he asks. Norma deflates like water wings after Labor Day.

“Even after everything I told you about your brother?” Dylan says yes—he isn’t sure how he can help with that situation, so the beach house is still happening. Norma starts angrily yanking the trash bag out of the garbage can, but it’s one of those models where you step on a lever to open the lid, and the trash bag always, always, always gets stuck in them. Dylan does know how to help with that, so he steps up to wrest the bag out of the container. “THANKS SO MUCH,” she hilariously yells at him.

Dylan takes the bag downstairs to the dumpster, where a man I’m pretty sure is Ed Begley, Jr. pulls up. Except it’s totally not Ed Begley, Jr. The actor’s name is Jere Burns and he’s on a bunch of critically-acclaimed shows, including Justified and Burn Notice. My apologies for the egregious error.

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“Can you tell me what happened to the Seafairer Motel?” he asks.

“New owners,” Dylan says. “It’s the Bates Motel now.”

Somewhat chagrined, not-Ed Begley, Jr. asks where Keith Summers is. Dylan informs the man of Summers’ untimely demise, and the mysterious man drives away.

At school, Norman can barely contain his excitement when he sees that Bradley has returned. “You’re back at school,” he states.

“Can’t hide behind death forever,” she says. As her friends usher her on—they did her book report on The Odyssey for her, by the way—Norman asks if he can see her later. Bradley sort of shrugs and spreads her arms, shaking her head apologetically.

The Man in Number 9

Suited up in her professional best, Norma is delivering brochures to businesses in hopes that they’ll help promote the motel. She'll do the same in return.

“We really don’t do that kind of thing so much,” says Liz Morgan, restaurant manager, not even trying to explain the full display of travel brochures visible to her left. “I’m selective about the businesses I promote in my restaurant,” Morgan continues, handing a brochure back to Norma. She goes on to say that the whole town knows everything that happened up at the motel. “People talk, and especially in a small town—it’s just kind of tainted the place." Norma has the gall to look surprised.

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She returns to the motel to check the reservations again, but there's still zip. Someone wants a room, however, because she’s getting ready to lock up when she sees a shadowy figure jiggling a key at the door to room #9. It’s the man from earlier—Jake Abernathy, he says—and he’s trying to figure out what happened to his every-other-month “standing room reservations” at the Seafairer.

Norma informs him that she had the locks changed when she took over the motel, and that although they’re not officially open for another week, he’s welcome to stay. “I’d be happy to get you a new key,” she says.

“To number nine,” Abernathy insists. Norma doesn’t care what room he stays in—she’s just thrilled to have a customer who is neither a wildly corrupt police officer nor an unconscious sex slave. She gets the key and bids him a good night.

Moments later, Dylan pulls up as Norma is finishing locking up and asks who's staying at the motel. Norma explains the whole standing reservations thing, and Dylan reports that he ran into the same man earlier, just sitting in his car, staring at the motel. “He was weird,” he concludes. “You got all of his info and everything already?”

I’m pretty sure that in Motel Ownership for Dummies, one of the first chapters is about making people pay for their rooms. Norma must have skipped that part, because she didn’t. Dylan offers to take care of it and knocks at Abernathy's door holding a very official-looking clipboard. When Abernathy opens up, Dylan requests a driver’s license and a credit card.

“My information is already in the system,” Abernathy says, but after Dylan explains that their system is different than the Seafairer system, he reluctantly hands his license over. While he’s writing down the info, Dylan asks what kind of business Abernathy’s in.

“Sales,” is the vague answer.

“What kind?” Dylan asks.

“Different kinds.”

Finished with copying the ID information, Dylan asks for a credit card. Abernathy hesitates, then reaches into his wallet and counts out at least five hundred dollar bills.

“That ought to be enough for the next few nights, won’t it?” he asks.

It sure is. Dylan takes the cash. En route to the house, he finds Norma on the outside steps with a bucket and scrub brush. She’s attempting to clean up the Shelby stain, but Dylan gives her a little Geology 101 lesson: “Stone’s porous. You can’t scrub blood out of it. It’ll wear off in time.” He adds that no one’s going to know that’s what the stain is.

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“I’m gonna know," she insists. "Every time I walk out the door it’s gonna be, ‘Oh, what a beautiful day. Heeeey, that’s where Deputy Shelby bled to death.'” She tells him what the restaurant manager said and worries about being the laughingstock of White Pine if the business fails. “That’s not what I moved here for,” she says, and resumes her futile scrubbing.

“You can’t get blood out of stone, Norma,” Dylan repeats, and tosses the wad of hundreds down to her bucket.

Strange Stares and Strange Noises

As they're picking up painting supplies, Norman tells Dylan that he can’t move in with him while their mother is in such a fragile state. The conversation trails off when he sees Bradley getting out of someone’s convertible; a goofy smile spreads over his face. Both brothers stare at her.

She spots Norman, looks a bit uncomfortable, but walks over to say hi anyway. She reports that she’s picking up some takeout because her mom’s out of town for a few days.

“Oh, you’re all by yourself there??” Norman asks, a little too excitedly.

“Yeah, it’s okay,” she says, then turns her attention to Dylan. “You work for Gil, right? My dad used to work with him. His name was Jerry Martin.”

Dylan makes the connection and offers her his condolences.

“Thanks,” Bradley says, and the two of them lock eyes until Norman interrupts.

“Your food’s gonna get cold,” he announces, which breaks Bradley out of her reverie.

Once Norman is in the truck, she shares one more lingering glance with Dylan.

“Is that the girl that texted you the other night? The one I told you to sleep with?” Dylan asks. Norman confirms that it is, but says that they haven’t really seen each other since.

“You know, her dad died. She’s got stuff going on,” Norman replies.

“Sure,” Dylan says unconvincingly.

At home, Norma is in bed when she hears a strange noise. She heads downstairs to investigate. In the dark. Alone. Will she ever learn? The back door leading out from the kitchen is banging open and shut in the wind. Norma grabs a knife, just in case something other than the wind opened that door. As she closes the door, she looks around outside. Nothing’s there.

Emma and Norma Join Forces

Emma comes over to see if Norman can come out to play.

Norma says she’ll go upstairs and get him. “Did you get a dog?” Emma asks, and they both look at the plate of food on the porch. Norma says she’s not aware of one, then goes to retrieve Norman. Turns out he’s is too busy pining for Bradley to waste time on Emma.

“You know that sweet girl likes you, right?” Norma asks.

“Maybe it’s nicer not to lead someone on,” he replies pointedly. His mother doesn’t miss the thinly-veiled accusation, and she’s suddenly giving him hell for leaving food out for stray animals.

She thunders downstairs to tell Emma that Norman is “sick,” but Emma’s no fool. She's headed out the door with tears in her eyes when Norma offers to buy lunch in exchange for directions to an interior decorating store.

On the way there, Norma probes for information on Norman.

“You wouldn’t happen to know what he’s so preoccupied with, would you?” she asks Emma.

Ummm, let’s see. Could it the move to a new town? His mom’s rape? The sex slave he rescued, who was later hunted down and killed on Bates property? The Deputy Shelby standoff? The fact that he thinks his mom might have killed his dad? That little notion his mom planted about him imagining things that aren’t really there?

Nah, it’s just Bradley. “I don’t know how fast he’s gonna get over her,” Emma tsks.

“Is he sleeping with this girl?” Norma is quick to ask.

“I - I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know.” I’m impressed with the variety of inflections in her voice. It’s the perfect teen denial. Norma asks what Bradley is like.

“She’s like a locomotive of sexual energy.” (Quote of the week.) Norma wonders how a high school girl could possibly be such a big deal. Clearly Norma has been out of that scene for a while, because my (also not-so recent) recollection is that popular teenage girls are forces to be reckoned with.

“I can show her to you after we go get the window sheers,” Emma offers. “She takes a yoga class by our shop. But ... that’s crazy, right?” Mrs. Bates never met a crazy plan she didn’t like, so they're immediately lurking outside of the yoga class, hiding from view about as well as my toddler hides during peek-a-boo.

After Emma points her out (“Blonde. Perfect. Two o’clock.”), Norma remembers that Bradley showed up on her doorstep for a “study date” the day after they moved in. After picturing Norman and Bradley doing some things you probably shouldn’t picture your son doing, Norma looks physically ill. They leave.

The Birds and the Bees, by Norma Bates

At home, Norman has coaxed the stray dog up onto the motel porch using the breadcrumb method.

“You have to come get this one, Juno,” he says, holding out his hand. Cautiously, the newly-named mutt comes forward to take the tasty morsel. Norman looks delighted—until the dog runs off as Norma approaches.

“You don’t know where she’s been or what she’s been doing. Stay away from her,” Norma snaps, and she’s mostly not talking about about the dog.

Up at the house, as mother and son are washing dishes together, Norman gives his pitch for keeping the dog. “She’s lost. She has no home. She’s lonely. I always wanted a dog. All families have a dog. It’s what you’re supposed to do. It’s normal.”

“Normal” is the magic word—Norma gives in, but says she’s not taking care of the dog. Then she springs The Talk on him. “Sex is a serious thing, Norman,” she says, clutching his hand. “You don’t know that girl well enough to be screwing her.”

“She’s a nice girl, mother.”

“Well, that remains to be seen. Personally, I don’t think nice girls come to your doorstep looking for a guy one day after he moves in, or sleep with someone they barely know at the age of 17, no less.”

Then, Norma launches into this whole weird explanation about how having sex is apparently similar to mixing Coke and Mentos. “Having sex with a woman literally affects her physical being. There are chemicals that are released in a woman’s body during and after sex that actually alter her. It’s like a science experiment. It affects her mind, okay? That’s dangerous stuff. That’s not something you want to be dabbling around in for fun.”

Norman says that he’s not dabbling—he really likes her. Awkward pause.

“Ohhhh,” Norma finally says. She smiles kind of condescendingly, then acts like she's changing the subject, telling Norman that she hired Emma for a few days a week because she needs help running her utterly vacant motel.

Norman sees through this charade and accuses his mother of matchmaking.

“It’s not like Bradley’s your girlfriend,” Norma snarks. “You don’t go out or anything.”

“It’s because her dad died, okay?” Norman gets defensive and storms out of the house.

“Normaaaaaan!” she screams through the night. I love that scream. I might make it my ringtone.

Romance is Dead, and so is Juno

Norman is, of course, headed to Bradley’s house. He creeps on her through a window for a while, then finally gets up the guts to knock on the door. Bradley is not as elated to see him as he had probably been hoping. He tells her they need to talk, but she claims to have a lot of homework. Norman either can’t read between the lines or doesn’t want to, because he plows ahead anyway.

“You’ve been through a lot. And I understand this. I lost my father too,” he says. “I know it can be confusing. But I also know that what happened to us was real.”

Bradley’s attempts to stop him before he further humiliates himself fall on deaf ears. My roommate in college had this endearing/annoying habit of changing the channel whenever something embarrassing was about to happen. She doesn’t watch <em>Bates Motel</em>, but if she did, she would be infuriating me right ... about ... now.

“I know we have a connection. You know, ‘cause I can feel it. Everytime I see you, it’s there. And that night we spent together was... and I know it was the same for you because you were there with me, right? So I don’t know what’s holding you back. You haven’t answered my texts. Maybe you haven’t broken up with Richard yet or something. But you should. Because you and I—we’re together, right?”

Finally able to get a word in edgewise, Bradley tells Norman that it was all a mistake. She doesn’t feel that way about him.“I shouldn’t have done it with someone—like you,” she says.

“Someone like me,” Norman repeats. His eyes turn dark and dangerous; he stalks off. “Personally, I don’t think nice girls come to your doorstep looking for nice guys one day after he moves in,” he recites to himself in the exact same tone of voice his mother used. “Or sleeps with someone they barely know at the age of 17, no less. I mean, really, what kind of a girl does that, invites you over to have sex with them after their dad dies?”

Bradley has been chasing him. When she catches up and asks him if he’s okay, he glowers at her. “I don’t think you’re a nice girl,” he says. She wraps him in a hug and apologizes. Norman goes home.

At the motel, Norma is reviewing the non-existent reservations again when Abernathy pushes open the door. He compliments her on the renovations and offers to spread the word about her business. He'd also like to book all of the rooms—all of them—for the first week of every other month.

Norma is elated, until something dawns on her. “It’s not anything illegal, right?”

“No, it’s not illegal.” They share a little chuckle.

Outside, Norman is almost back home when he sees Juno the dog across the street. He could use a friend right now, so he crouches down and calls her—just as a car approaches.

The “special effect” of the dog being hit is not realistic in the least. It looks exactly like a firmly-stuffed plushie falling over on the road, and for that I am grateful. Norma runs out of the house at the sound of the screeching tires.

“I killed my dog,” Norman cries, and my heart breaks. “I’m taking her to Emma’s dad. He can fix dead things.” Ummm.

“She’s dead, Norman,” Norma says. “No one can fix her.”

“I’m not gonna leave her in the street! I’m taking her to Emma’s!”

“This is crazy,” she protests.

“IT’S NOT CRAZY,” he screams (totally crazily). Norma relents, hugging him and offers to drive him to Emma’s house.

“I was wrong, mother,” Norman says, calmly. “About everything.”

Next week’s episode is called “A boy and his dog,” so I suspect that we’re going to witness the true birth of Norman’s obsession with taxidermy. Get excited!

Notes:

- “Seafairer” is the series’ misspelling, not mine. Think they did it on purpose? A reference to the White Pine Bay “eye for an eye” concept of fair? Yeah, it’s probably just a typo.

- Bedford House Restaurant = reference to John Bedford, a man in an Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode who is accused of murdering his wealthy aunt. To scare a confession out of Bedford, an investigator hires an actress to pretend to be the ghost of the dead woman. Hmmm.

- Likewise, Abernathy is the name of a man in “Martha Mason, Movie Star,” another Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode.

- So, Juno the dog. The Roman goddess Juno is way too complicated to dissect in this already-lengthy recap, but here are the highlights: she was a protector, is associated with eternal youthfulness and was known for the complexity and multiplicity of her personality. Or maybe Norman just really likes Diablo Cody.

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9 Things We Know About Stranger Things Season 3
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[Warning: There are lots of Stranger Things season two spoilers ahead.]

Stranger Things season two is in the books, and like we all hoped, it turned out to be a worthy follow-up to an addictive debut season. Now, though, we’re left with plenty of questions, mysteries, and theories to chew on as the wait for a third season begins. But for everything we don’t know about what the next season of Stranger Things will bring us (such as an actual release date), there are more than enough things we do know to keep those fan theories coming well into 2018. Since it was officially greenlit for a third season by Netflix in December 2017, new details have been trickling out. Here’s everything we know about Stranger Things season three so far.

1. THERE WILL BE ANOTHER TIME JUMP.

The third season of Stranger Things won’t pick up right where the second one left off. Like the show experienced between the first two seasons, there will be a time jump between seasons two and three as well. The reason is simple: the child actors are all growing up, and instead of having the kids look noticeably older without explanation for year three, the Duffer Brothers told The Hollywood Reporter:

“Our kids are aging. We can only write and produce the show so fast. They're going to be almost a year older by the time we start shooting season three. It provides certain challenges. You can't start right after season two ended. It forces you to do a time jump. But what I like is that it makes you evolve the show. It forces the show to evolve and change, because the kids are changing.”

2. THE IDEA IS TO BE SMALLER IN SCALE.

If the series’s second season was about expanding the Stranger Things mythology, the third season won't go bigger just for the sake of it, with the brothers even going so far as to say that it will be a more intimate story.

“It’s not necessarily going to be bigger in scale,” Matt Duffer said in an interview with IndieWire. “What I am really excited about is giving these characters an interesting journey to go on.”

Ross Duffer did stress, though, that as of early November, season three is basically “… Matt and me working with some writers and figuring out where it’s going to go.”

3. THE MIND FLAYER WILL BE BACK.

The second season ended on a bit of a foreboding note when it was revealed that the Mind Flayer was still in the Upside Down and was seen looming over the Hawkins school as the winter dance was going on. Though we know there will be a time jump at the start of next season, it’s clear that the monster will still have a big presence on the show.

Executive producer Dan Cohen told TV Guide: "There were other ways we could have ended beyond that, but I think that was a very strong, lyrical ending, and it really lets us decide to focus where we ultimately are going to want to go as we dive into Season 3."

What does the Mind Flayer’s presence mean for the new crop of episodes? Well, there will be plenty of fan theories to ponder between now and the season three premiere (whenever that may be).

4. PLENTY OF LEFTOVER SEASON TWO STORYLINES WILL BE IN SEASON THREE.

The Duffer Brothers had a lot of material for the latest season of the show—probably a bit too much. Speaking with Vulture, Matt Duffer detailed a few details and plot points that had to be pushed to season three:

"Billy was supposed to have a bigger role. We ended up having so many characters it ended up, in a way, more teed up for season three than anything. There was a whole teen supernatural story line that just got booted because it was just too cluttered, you know? A lot of that’s just getting kicked into season three."

The good news is that he also told the site that this wealth of cut material could make the writing process for the third season much quicker.

5. THERE WILL BE MORE ERICA.

Stranger Things already had a roster of fan-favorite characters heading into season two, but newcomer Erica, Lucas’s little sister, may have overshadowed them all. Played by 11-year-old Priah Ferguson, Erica is equal parts expressive, snarky, and charismatic. And the Duffer Brothers couldn’t agree more, saying that there will be much more Erica next season.

“There will definitely be more Erica in Season 3,” Ross Duffer told Yahoo!. “That is the fun thing about the show—you discover stuff as you’re filming. We were able to integrate more of her in, but not as much you want because the story [was] already going. ‘We got to use more Erica’—that was one of the first things we said in the writers’ room.”

“I thought she’s very GIF-able, if that’s a word,” Matt Duffer added. “She was great.”

6. EXPECT KALI TO RETURN.

The season two episode “The Lost Sister” was a bit of an outlier for the series. It’s a standalone episode that focuses solely on the character Eleven, leaving the central plot and main cast of Hawkins behind. As well-received as Stranger Things season two was, this episode was a near-unanimous miss among fans and critics.

The episode did, however, introduce us to the character of Kali (Linnea Berthelsen), who has the ability to manipulate people’s minds with illusions she creates. Despite the reaction, the Duffers felt the episode was vital to Eleven’s development, and that Kali won’t be forgotten moving forward.

“It feels weird to me that we wouldn’t solve [Kali’s] storyline. I would say chances are very high she comes back,” Matt Duffer said at the Vulture Festival.

7. OTHER "NUMBERS" MIGHT SHOW UP.

We're already well acquainted with Eleven, and season two introduced us to Eight (a.k.a. Kali), and executive producer Shawn Levy heavily hinted to E! that there are probably more Hawkins Laboratory experiments on the horizon.

"I think we've clearly implied there are other numbers, and I can't imagine that the world will only ever know Eleven and Eight," Levy said.

8. THERE MIGHT NOT BE MANY SEASONS LEFT.

Don’t be in too much of a rush to find out everything about the next season of Stranger Things; there might not be many more left. The Duffer Brothers have said in the past that the plan is to do four seasons and end it. However, Levy gave fans a glimmer of hope that things may go on a little while longer—just by a bit, though.

“Hearts were heard breaking in Netflix headquarters when the Brothers made four seasons sound like an official end, and I was suddenly getting phone calls from our actors’ agents,” Levy told Entertainment Weekly. “The truth is we’re definitely going four seasons and there’s very much the possibility of a fifth. Beyond that, it becomes I think very unlikely.”

9. CARY ELWES AND JAKE BUSEY HAVE JOINED THE CAST.

The cast of Stranger Things is growing for season three, and two of the most high-profile additions announced so far are Cary Elwes and Jake Busey. Elwes—of The Princess Bride and Robin Hood: Men in Tights fame—will be playing Mayor Kline, who is described as "Your classic ’80s politician—more concerned with his own image than with the people of the small town he governs." All we know about Busey’s character is that he’ll be named Bruce and is described as "a journalist for the The Hawkins Post, with questionable morals and a sick sense of humor."

In March, it was also announced that Maya Hawke, daughter of Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawke, landed a role in the upcoming season. According to Variety, she’ll play an "'alternative girl' bored with her mundane day job. She seeks excitement in her life and gets more than she bargained for when she uncovers a dark secret in Hawkins, Ind."

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New LEGO Set Recreates Jurassic Park's Iconic Velociraptor Chase Scenes
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LEGO

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the fifth installment in the Jurassic Park franchise, is skulking into theaters on June 22. That makes now the perfect time to revisit the original film in LEGO form.

This LEGO set, spotted by Nerdist, depicts some of the most suspenseful scenes from the 1993 movie. There's the main computer room where Ariana Richards's Lex shows off her hacker skills while Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) struggle to keep a hungry dinosaur from barging in. Just like in the film, the door features a deadbolt lock that's velociraptor-proof (though, unfortunately for the characters, the detachable window is not). Other Easter eggs hidden in this part include a map of Isla Nublar and a screener saver of LEGO Dennis Nedry (Wayne Knight).

In the neighboring room, you'll find the cold storage unit where the dinosaur embryos are kept, along with the fake shaving cream can Nedry uses to steal them. The final section is the kitchen, where Tim (Joseph Mazzello) and Lex are stalked by the velociraptor. There's less room for them to hide in the LEGO version compared to the movie set, but there is at least one functioning cabinet for Lex to tuck herself into. Closer inspection reveals even more details from the film, like the lime-green Jello Lex is eating when the raptors first arrive and the step ladder the gang uses to escape into the air ducts during the final chase.

LEGO Jurassic Park set.

LEGO Jurassic Park set.

LEGO Jurassic Park set.

The Jurassic Park Velociraptor Chase set is currently available from the LEGO shop for $40.

[h/t Nerdist]

All images courtesy of LEGO.

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