Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Witness a Century of Rising Earth Temperatures

Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Predictions about the future tend to dominate the conversation surrounding global warming. You may have heard that Arctic temperatures are expected to increase by 7° to 13°F over the next century, or that sea levels could rise by as much as 6 feet in that same amount of time. But you don't need to look ahead to see the impact of climate change on our planet—just take glance at the temperature data from the last 100 years.

Co.Design recently spotlighted an animated infographic designed by Antti Lipponen, a senior scientist at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The visualization pulls from NASA data to illustrate the dramatic ascent of average global temperatures between 1900 and 2016.

The circular graph includes one bar for each of the world’s countries. Their colors shift from blue to red, with red representing years far hotter than that nation’s average. As the century progresses, the graphic unfurls into a deep red sunburst of temperature anomalies which acts as both a stunning piece of art and a sobering educational tool.

Lipponen isn't the first scientist to use climate statistics to make a visually captivating statement. Check out Jill Pelto's "Glaciogenic Art," which combines hard data with watercolors of natural landscapes in peril.

[h/t Co.Design]

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN
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iStock
How Rich the U.S. Is Compared to the Rest of the World, Visualized
iStock
iStock

The U.S. is often called the richest country in the world. But how rich is it, really? A new infographic from How Much, spotted by Digg, explores the average household income across the 36 countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). As you can see in the graphic below, the U.S. is, on average, quite rich compared to most other countries.

The infographic explores finances on two different levels. The size of each bubble corresponds to household wealth: in other words, assets minus debts. That means it takes into account savings, stocks, and other financial assets as well as loans. (It doesn't include property holdings due to a lack of data, so it doesn't encompass the big boost of wealth that comes from say, owning a penthouse overlooking Central Park in New York City.) As you can see, the U.S.'s bubble is a pretty big outlier. On average, U.S. families have a net worth of $176,100, compared to just $128,400 in the second-wealthiest country on the map, Switzerland.

Colored bubbles represent household income and wealth across the OCED
How Much

The colors of the bubbles correspond to "household net adjusted disposable income," as the OECD refers to it, which has to do with the money you bring in each year rather than what you own. That takes into account salary, income from things like stock dividends and rental properties, and government benefits (like Social Security, unemployment, food stamps, or housing subsidies). It also takes into account what each household pays in taxes, providing a snapshot of the take-home pay people actually have available to spend, rather than their pre-tax salary.

The U.S. has relatively high salaries, at $44,000 a year (the top of the scale) in disposable income. Only Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Norway have disposable income levels greater than $35,000. Mexico falls at the bottom of the scale, with average adjusted disposable incomes of less than $15,000. Most of Western Europe falls within the $25,100 to $30,000 range, while income in Eastern Europe, Israel, South Korea, and New Zealand is a little lower.

There could be a lot going on behind this data, though. The U.S. has an increasingly stratified economic system, so while the averages seem fairly high, that's probably because the few billionaires among us are skewing the numbers. The U.S. also doesn't have the social safety net offered by governments in much of the rest of the world, meaning that while we have relatively high salaries and pay lower taxes in some cases, we have to pay for things like healthcare and retirement on our own.

Read more about the OECD numbers here.

[h/t Digg]

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