Witness a Century of Rising Earth Temperatures

Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Antti Lipponen, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Predictions about the future tend to dominate the conversation surrounding global warming. You may have heard that Arctic temperatures are expected to increase by 7° to 13°F over the next century, or that sea levels could rise by as much as 6 feet in that same amount of time. But you don't need to look ahead to see the impact of climate change on our planet—just take glance at the temperature data from the last 100 years.

Co.Design recently spotlighted an animated infographic designed by Antti Lipponen, a senior scientist at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The visualization pulls from NASA data to illustrate the dramatic ascent of average global temperatures between 1900 and 2016.

The circular graph includes one bar for each of the world’s countries. Their colors shift from blue to red, with red representing years far hotter than that nation’s average. As the century progresses, the graphic unfurls into a deep red sunburst of temperature anomalies which acts as both a stunning piece of art and a sobering educational tool.

Lipponen isn't the first scientist to use climate statistics to make a visually captivating statement. Check out Jill Pelto's "Glaciogenic Art," which combines hard data with watercolors of natural landscapes in peril.

[h/t Co.Design]

The Best and Worst Airports, Airlines, and Routes to Fly on Thanksgiving

iStock.com/simonkr
iStock.com/simonkr

Traveling around the holidays is always stressful, but depending on where you're starting out and where you're headed, it could be particularly bad. Especially if you're flying out of Oakland, Dallas, or Chicago, according to new data compiled by Treetopia, an online retailer devoted to artificial Christmas trees and wreaths.

Treetopia crunched some numbers to discover the worst airports, airlines, and days to travel around the Thanksgiving holiday, discovering that certain travelers have a much better better shot of having a smooth airport experience than others. In some cases, it could be a matter of going to the airport across town, even. Based on data from last November's holiday travel, here are the worst places to fly out of in late November:

A map of the airports in the U.S. with the worst flight delays on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

In Chicago, for instance, Midway faces some of the worst delays in the country around Thanksgiving, but O'Hare has one of the best track records. In the D.C. area, you're much better off flying out of Dulles (No. 5 on the Best Airports list) than the Baltimore-Washington airport (No. 9 on the Worst Airports list). And in the Bay Area, you want to avoid going to either Oakland (the country's worst airport for Thanksgiving travel, and a regular on most-delayed lists) or San Jose (the fifth worst). Hopefully you can fly out of San Francisco instead.

If you're looking for the most reliable travel experience, below are the best airports and airlines to fly that week, according to Treetopia's numbers.

A map of the best airports for Thanksgiving travel
Treetopia

However, your likelihood of delay is also affected by which airline you're flying with and what route you're traveling on. Shorter routes in particular seem to be at risk of delays—especially if you're flying within California.

Charts of the best and worst air travel routes to fly around Thanksgiving
Treetopia

And here are the airlines you should avoid and the ones you should gravitate toward if you're looking to get to Thanksgiving dinner on time:

Charts of the best and worst airlines to travel with on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

Best of luck at the airport this holiday season! And get ready: Christmas/holiday-travel season is just a few short weeks away.

The Most-Googled Thanksgiving Recipe in Each State

iStock.com/VeselovaElena
iStock.com/VeselovaElena

Each year when November rolls around, novice cooks start frantically searching for answers to all their turkey-related questions. When should it be thawed? Is an oven or deep fryer better? What’s the best recipe? Hotlines like Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line get flooded with hundreds of thousands of calls each holiday season.

So it’s no surprise that turkey was the most-Googled Thanksgiving dish across America last November, according to Satelliteinternet.com’s new analysis of food-related Google searches. But not every cook was looking for turkey advice last Thanksgiving. There was plenty of regional variation in the recipes people were searching for, as the map below shows.

Green bean and corn casseroles were the next most-searched items after turkey last year, having amassed a particularly large fan base in the Midwest. Other searches are more unique. Vermonters seem to love ambrosia salad, while Louisianans can be expected to serve up a lot of cornbread dressing. Meanwhile, residents of Maryland, Virginia, Mississippi, and Illinois wanted to know how to make a copycat version of Popeyes Cajun turkey. (If you happen to be one of them, you can view a recipe here.)

A color-coded map of the U.S.
Satelliteinternet.com

Meanwhile, in Idaho and Utah, Jell-O is apparently a very popular dish in the month of November. Perhaps people were whipping up something like Allrecipe.com's Thanksgiving Jell-O Salad, which is made from crushed pineapple, cottage cheese, lime Jell-O, and whipped topping.

Previous analyses have found even more variation in what Americans eat on Thanksgiving. Back in 2014, The New York Times looked into the most uniquely popular Thanksgiving dish in each state, excluding common dishes like turkey. Deer jerky, sweet potato dumplings, asparagus casserole, turkey enchiladas, and something called frog eye salad were a few of the top search results.

Those dishes aren’t nearly as weird as some of the Thanksgiving dishes that were served up several decades ago, though. Creamed onions, cranberry salad with mayonnaise, and jellied turkey-vegetable salad are among some of the more off-putting vintage recipes we’ve dug up.

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