What Is the Jet Stream, and How Does It Work?

Trapped between two big high-pressure systems, Hurricane Harvey has stalled over Houston, to devastating effect. As the Washington Post notes, if the jet stream were to dip far enough south, it could push Harvey out. Unfortunately, that's not in the forecast.

But what is the jet stream?

A jet stream is a swift current of air that encircles the globe right around the cruising altitude of a commercial airplane. It's easy to forget that there are vast rivers of wind whooshing just a few miles above our heads at speeds that could put most hurricanes and tornadoes to shame, but jet streams affect us every day without our realizing it. These speedy winds drive or influence just about every weather system that we have the pleasure—or misfortune—of experiencing. Planes even use it to cut down on fuel consumption and travel times.

There are usually two jet streams in each hemisphere, the polar jet and the subtropical jet. When we talk about "the jet stream," we're generally talking about the stronger polar jet stream, because most of our weather is driven by it. It's typically found at the same latitude as the U.S.-Canadian border.

We're often guilty of oversimplifying weather events by blaming everything on a clash between warm air and cold air, but temperature gradients really do have an enormous impact on where the jet stream forms and how strong it is. Jet streams form as air in the upper atmosphere moves from south to north and gets deflected to the east by the Coriolis effect. The jet stream will get stronger if the warmer temperatures are to the south and the colder the air is to the north. This is why the jet stream strengthens and dips over the United States during the winter, while it weakens and retreats north into Canada during the heat of the summer.

The jet stream drives our weather through phenomena called troughing, ridging, and jet streaks. Troughs and ridges are curves in the jet stream that are analogous to low pressure (troughs) and high pressure (ridges). In the northern hemisphere, a trough is a southward dip in the jet stream and a ridge is a northward hump in the wind current. You can expect active weather ahead of a trough and quiet weather beneath a ridge.

A jet streak is an area of much faster winds within the jet stream itself. Winds in a jet stream routinely climb above 100 mph, but the wind in a jet streak can clock speeds of more than 200 mph in a boisterous weather pattern. Troughs and jet streaks often team up to create low-pressure systems at the surface, and that's what gives birth to most of our interesting weather. Winds don't flow in a straight line as they twist around a trough or speed in and out of jet streaks. Air collides going into a trough and diverges as it leaves a trough. The same goes for jet streaks.

The process of winds exiting a trough or a jet streak, known as divergence, creates a void in the upper atmosphere. Nature hates imbalance and will do just about anything to balance something that's out of whack. When winds diverge coming out of certain parts of the jet stream, air will rush up from lower altitudes to fill the void. This upward rush of air from the surface leaves lower air pressure at the surface, creating a low-pressure system that can trigger all sorts of nasty weather.

The jet stream is also one of those weather features that could feel the effects of climate change over the coming decades and centuries. Since these wind currents rely on sharp temperature gradients in order to form, a warmer atmosphere will lessen the temperature difference between north and south and possibly create weaker jet streams. A weaker jet stream could act more erratically, creating longer stretches of quiet weather—but also more frequent weather extremes.

12 Intriguing Facts About the Intestines

When we talk about the belly, gut, or bowels, what we're really talking about are the intestines—long, hollow, coiled tubes that comprise a major part of the digestive tract, running from the stomach to the anus. The intestines begin with the small intestine, divided into three parts whimsically named the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, which absorb most of the nutrients from what we eat and drink. Food then moves into the large intestine, or colon, which absorbs water from the digested food and expels it into the rectum. That's when sensitive nerves in your rectum create the sensation of needing to poop.

These organs can be the source of intestinal pain, such as in irritable bowel syndrome, but they can also support microbes that are beneficial to your overall health. Here are some more facts about your intestines.

1. The intestines were named by medieval anatomists.

Medieval anatomists had a pretty good understanding of the physiology of the gut, and are the ones who gave the intestinal sections their names, which are still used today in modern anatomy. When they weren't moralizing about the organs, they got metaphorical about them. In 1535, the Spanish doctor Andrés Laguna noted that because the intestines "carry the chyle and all the excrement through the entire region of the stomach as if through the Ocean Sea," they could be likened to "those tall ships which as soon as they have crossed the ocean come to Rouen with their cargoes on their way to Paris but transfer their cargoes at Rouen into small boats for the last stage of the journey up the Seine."

2. Leonardo da Vinci believed the intestines helped you breathe.

Leonardo mistakenly believed the digestive system aided respiratory function. In 1490, he wrote in his unpublished notebooks, "The compressed intestines with the condensed air which is generated in them, thrust the diaphragm upwards; the diaphragm compresses the lungs and expresses the air." While that isn't anatomically accurate, it is true that the opening of the lungs is helped by the relaxation of stomach muscles, which does draw down the diaphragm.

3. Your intestines could cover two tennis courts ...

Your intestines take up a whole lot of square footage inside you. "The surface area of the intestines, if laid out flat, would cover two tennis courts," Colby Zaph, a professor of immunology in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at Melbourne's Monash University, tells Mental Floss. The small intestine alone is about 20 feet long, and the large intestine about 5 feet long.

4. ... and they're pretty athletic.

The process of moving food through your intestines requires a wave-like pattern of muscular action, known as peristalsis, which you can see in action during surgery in this YouTube video.

5. Your intestines can fold like a telescope—but that's not something you want to happen.

Intussusception is the name of a condition where a part of your intestine folds in on itself, usually between the lower part of the small intestine and the beginning of the large intestine. It often presents as severe intestinal pain and requires immediate medical attention. It's very rare, and in children may be related to a viral infection. In adults, it's more commonly a symptom of an abnormal growth or polyp.

6. Intestines are very discriminating.

"The intestines have to discriminate between good things—food, water, vitamins, good bacteria—and bad things, such as infectious organisms like viruses, parasites and bad bacteria," Zaph says. Researchers don't entirely know how the intestines do this. Zaph says that while your intestines are designed to keep dangerous bacteria contained, infectious microbes can sometimes penetrate your immune system through your intestines.

7. The small intestine is covered in "fingers" ...

The lining of the small intestine is blanketed in tiny finger-like protrusions known as villi. These villi are then covered in even tinier protrusions called microvilli, which help capture food particles to absorb nutrients, and move food on to the large intestine.

8. ... And you can't live without it.

Your small intestine "is the sole point of food and water absorption," Zaph says. Without it, "you'd have to be fed through the blood."

9. The intestines house your microbiome. 

The microbiome is made up of all kinds of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoans, "and probably used to include worm parasites too," says Zaph. So in a way, he adds, "we are constantly infected with something, but it [can be] helpful, not harmful."

10. Intestines are sensitive to change.

Zaph says that many factors change the composition of the microbiome, including antibiotics, foods we eat, stress, and infections. But in general, most people's microbiomes return to a stable state after these events. "The microbiome composition is different between people and affected by diseases. But we still don't know whether the different microbiomes cause disease, or are a result in the development of disease," he says.

11. Transferring bacteria from one gut to another can transfer disease—or maybe cure it.

"Studies in mice show that transplanting microbes from obese mice can transfer obesity to thin mice," Zaph says. But transplanting microbes from healthy people into sick people can be a powerful treatment for some intestinal infections, like that of the bacteria Clostridium difficile, he adds. Research is pouring out on how the microbiome affects various diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, and even autism.

12. The microbes in your intestines might influence how you respond to medical treatments.

Some people don't respond to cancer drugs as effectively as others, Zaph says. "One reason is that different microbiomes can metabolize the drugs differently." This has huge ramifications for chemotherapy and new cancer treatments called checkpoint inhibitors. As scientists learn more about how different bacteria metabolize drugs, they could possibly improve how effective existing cancer treatments are.

This 3D-Printed Sushi is Customized For You Based on the Biological Sample You Send In

Open Meals
Open Meals

Many high-end restaurants require guests to make a reservation before they dine. At Sushi Singularity in Tokyo, diners will be asked to send fecal samples to achieve the ideal experience. As designboom reports, the new sushi restaurant from Open Meals creates custom sushi recipes to fit each customer's nutritional needs.

Open Meals is known for its experimental food projects, like the "sushi teleportation" concept, which has robotic arms serving up sushi in the form of 3D-printed cubes. This upcoming venture takes the idea of a futuristic sushi restaurant to new extremes.

Guests who plan on dining at Sushi Singularity will receive a health test kit in the mail, with vials for collecting biological materials like urine, saliva, and feces. After the kit is sent back to the sushi restaurant, the customer's genome and nutritional status will be analyzed and made into a "Health ID." Using that information, Sushi Singularity builds personalized sushi recipes, optimizing ingredients with the nutrients the guest needs most. The restaurant uses a machine to inject raw vitamins and minerals directly into the food.

To make things even more dystopian, all the sushi at Sushi Singularity will be produced by a 3D-printer with giant robotic arms. The menu items make the most of the technology; a cell-cultured tuna in a lattice structure, powdered uni hardened with a CO2 laser, and a highly detailed model of a Japanese castle made from flash-frozen squid are a few of the sushi concepts Open Meals has shared.

The company plans to launch Sushi Singularity in Tokyo some time in 2020. Theirs won't be the first sushi robots to roll out in Japan: The food delivery service Ride On Express debuted sushi delivery robots in the country in 2017.

[h/t designboom]

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