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Harry Potter's Childhood Home Can Be Yours for $1.3 Million

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Carter Jonas

Harry Potter may have spent his childhood years sleeping in a cupboard under the stairs at 4 Privet Drive, but his origin story really begins at Godric’s Hollow, the quaint village where Harry's parents lived when he was a baby. There, Voldemort first met his downfall and Harry became “The Boy Who Lived.” Now, The Telegraph reports that the historic home that served as Godric’s Hollow in 2010's Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is on the market—giving fans the rare chance to own a fictional piece of wizarding history.

Known as the de Vere House, the historic home is located in the medieval village of Lavenham, in Suffolk, England. The country’s wealthiest non-royal family, the de Veres, owned the home from the 14th to the 17th centuries, and it’s said that King Henry VIII once paid a visit to the property during a hunting trip in 1498.

According to current homeowners Tony and Jane Ranzetta, Harry Potter producers used creative editing techniques to transform footage of the de Vere House into the village of Godric’s Hollow: "The crew arrived without actors and filmed both the front and the back in the height of summer,” Tony told The Telegraph in 2012. "They then used parts of the house like pieces of a massive three dimensional jigsaw, cutting and pasting them to form the streets of Godric's Hollow.”

Historic and pop culture credentials aside, de Vere House—a six-bedroom structure that's currently divided in two—is replete with entertaining spaces, and has two kitchens and a dining room. The backyard has a flower garden and an outdoor dining terrace, and the property also contains an old stable, garden shacks, and a kitchen garden.

This isn’t the first time de Vere House has hit the market: The Ranzettas first listed the home for sale in 2012, but for unknown reasons, it didn’t sell. That said, it’s naturally a magnet for tourists, so whoever purchases it will need to be comfortable with cameras—and with shelling out a cool £995,000 (about $1.3 million) for their magical new digs.

Check out some photos of Harry Potter’s “birthplace” below, or visit the home’s online listing for more details.

The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

 The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

 The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

 The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

 The historic De Vere House in Lavenham, Suffolk, which was used in the 'Harry Potter' films to create Godric’s Hollow, is for sale.
Carter Jonas

[h/t The Telegraph]

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Hamilton Broadway
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Food
A Hamilton-Themed Cookbook is Coming
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Hamilton Broadway

Fans of Broadway hit Hamilton will soon be able to dine like the Founding Fathers: As Eater reports, a new Alexander Hamilton-inspired cookbook is slated for release in fall 2017.

Cover art for Laura Kumin's forthcoming cookbook
Amazon

Called The Hamilton Cookbook: Cooking, Eating, and Entertaining in Hamilton’s World, the recipe collection by author Laura Kumin “takes you into Hamilton’s home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day,” according to the Amazon description. It also recounts Hamilton’s favorite dishes, how he enjoyed them, and which ingredients were used.

Recipes included are cauliflower florets two ways, fried sausages and apples, gingerbread cake, and apple pie. (Cue the "young, scrappy, and hungry" references.) The cookbook’s official release is on November 21—but until then, you can stave off your appetite for all things Hamilton-related by downloading the musical’s new app.

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fun
Never Buy Drawing Paper Again With This Endlessly Reusable Art Notebook
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Art supplies can get pricey when you’re letting your kid’s creativity run wild. But with an endlessly reusable notebook, you never have to worry about running out of paper during that after-school coloring session.

The creators of the erasable Rocketbook Wave have come out with a new version of their signature product meant especially for color drawings. The connected Rocketbook Color notebook allows you to send images drawn on its pages to Google Drive or other cloud services with your phone, then erase the pages by sticking the whole notebook in the microwave. You get a digital copy of your work (one that, with more vibrant colors, might look even better than the original) and get to go on drawing almost immediately after you fill the book.

An animated view of a notebook’s pages changing between different drawings.

There’s no special equipment involved beyond the notebook itself. The Rocketbook Color works with Crayola and other brands’ washable crayons and colored pencils, plus dry-erase markers. The pages are designed to be smudge-proof, so turning the page won’t ruin the art on the other side even if you are using dry-erase markers.

Rocketbook’s marketing is aimed at kids, but adults like to save paper, too. Break away from the adult coloring books and go free-form. If it doesn’t quite work out, you can just erase it forever.

The notebooks are $20 each on Kickstarter.

All images courtesy Rocketbook

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