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Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
Museé d’Orsay, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

A Century's Worth of Important Art History Is Going Online

Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
Museé d’Orsay, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

A century’s worth of art history research will soon be coming online. According to Artnet, the nonprofit Wildenstein Plattner Institute plans to digitize its extensive collection of art records.

The nonprofit WPI, founded in 2016, is a scholarly endeavor created by the billionaire art dealer Guy Wildenstein, who runs an international art-dealing empire that includes the Paris-based Wildenstein Institute. The Wildenstein Institute publishes catalogues raisonnés (comprehensive listings of every known artwork an artist has created), and the nonprofit arm, WPI is going to receive the rights to publish those catalogues. The research materials amassed by the Wildenstein family over the last 100 years will be digitized and made available online, the WPI announced this summer.

Though the institute hasn’t announced an exact timeline for this project, it plans to develop extensively researched online catalogues raisonnés for Impressionist artists like Claude Monet and Edouard Manet within the next few years. They will be regularly updated as new scholarship becomes available.

The institute will also have research on individual artworks, stock books from art galleries, collections of artists’ letters, annotated sale catalogues, and other materials vital to art historians. According to Artnet, this includes materials that were previously unavailable to the public or thought to have been destroyed. A full list of the materials available within the archives is scheduled to go online by the end of 2018, allowing researchers to request certain items from WPI for study.

“We are committed to using the latest technology to reveal the scope and richness of these holdings for the first time,” the WPI’s executive director, Elizabeth Gorayeb, says in a press release [PDF].

[h/t Artnet]

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Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
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Watch a Chain of Dominos Climb a Flight of Stairs
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Dominos are made to fall down—it's what they do. But in the hands of 19-year-old professional domino artist Lily Hevesh, known as Hevesh5 on YouTube, the tiny plastic tiles can be arranged to fall up a flight of stairs in spectacular fashion.

The video spotted by Thrillist shows the chain reaction being set off at the top a staircase. The momentum travels to the bottom of the stairs and is then carried back up through a Rube Goldberg machine of balls, cups, dominos, and other toys spanning the steps. The contraption leads back up to the platform where it began, only to end with a basketball bouncing down the steps and toppling a wall of dominos below.

The domino art seems to flow effortlessly, but it took more than a few shots to get it right. The footage below shows the 32nd attempt at having all the elements come together in one, unbroken take. (You can catch the blooper at the end of an uncooperative basketball ruining a near-perfect run.)

Hevesh’s domino chains that don't appear to defy gravity are no less impressive. Check out this ambitious rainbow domino spiral that took her 25 hours to construct.

[h/t Thrillist]

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Tulip fields in Holland, Claude Monet (1886)
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A Secret Room Full of Michelangelo's Sketches Will Soon Open in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Parents all over the world have chastised their children for drawing on the walls. But when you're Michelangelo, you've got some leeway. According to The Local, the Medici Chapels, part of the Bargello museum in Florence, Italy, has announced that it plans to open a largely unseen room full of the artist's sketches to the public by 2020.

Roughly 40 years ago, curators of the chapels at the Basilica di San Lorenzo had a very Dan Brown moment when they discovered a trap door in a wardrobe leading to an underground room that appeared to have works from Michelangelo covering its walls. The tiny retreat is thought to be a place where the artist hid out in 1530 after upsetting the Medicis—his patrons—by joining a revolt against their control of Florence. While in self-imposed exile for several months, he apparently spent his time drawing on whatever surfaces were available.

A drawing by Michelangelo under the Medici Chapels in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Museum officials previously believed the room and the charcoal drawings were too fragile to risk visitors, but have since had a change of heart, leading to their plan to renovate the building and create new attractions. While not all of the work is thought to be attributable to the famed artist, there's enough of it in the subterranean chamber—including drawings of Jesus and even recreations of portions of the Sistine Chapel—to make a trip worthwhile.

[h/t The Local]

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