The Funniest Word in the English Language? 'Booty,' According to New Survey

iStock
iStock

Some words, regardless of their meaning, are simply more chuckle-worthy than others. To determine which expressions in the English language are truly the most comical, Smithsonian reports that psychologists at the University of Warwick in the UK conducted a survey in which they asked people to rate the “humor value” of a sampling of chosen words. They recently published their findings in the journal Behavior Research Methods.

The researchers selected nearly 5000 words, and then used Amazon’s online crowdsourcing tool Mechanical Turk to ask more than 800 individuals to rank the humor value of 211 randomly chosen words from the list, on a scale from 1 (humorless) to 5 (humorous). Likely not surprising to anyone with younger siblings, the funniest word ended up being “booty,” with an average ranking of 4.32. In descending order, the remaining top 12 words—which all received a score of 3.9 or higher—were “tit,” “booby,” “hooter,” “nitwit,” “twit,” “waddle,” “tinkle,” “bebop,” “egghead,” “ass,” and “twerp.”

Why these words are so funny remains fuzzy. But when they analyzed their findings according to age and gender, the researchers did find that sexually suggestive words like “orgy” and “bondage” tended to tickle the funny bones of men, as did the words “birthmark,” “brand,” “chauffeur,” “doze,” “buzzard,” “czar,” “weld,” “prod,” “corn,” and “raccoon.”

Meanwhile, women tended to laugh at the words “giggle,” “beast,” “circus,” “grand,” “juju,” “humbug,” “slicker,” “sweat,” “ennui,” “holder,” “momma,” and “sod.” As for people under the age of 32, they were amused by “goatee,” “joint,” and “gangster,” while older participants liked “squint,” “jingle,” “burlesque,” and “pong.” Across the board, all parties were least amused by words like “rape,” “torture,” and “torment.”

Although humor is complex and dependent on elements like syntax and delivery, the study's researchers say that breaking comedy down to single-word units could demystify its essence.

“The research initially came about as a result of our curiosity,” said Tomas Engelthaler, the study’s lead author, in a press release. “We were wondering if certain words are perceived as funnier, even when read on their own. It turns out that indeed is the case. Humor is an everyday aspects of our lives and we hope this publicly available dataset allows future researchers to better understand its foundations.”

[h/t Smithsonian]

JELL-O's New Edible Slimes Are As Fun to Eat As They Are to Play With

JELL-O/The Kraft Heinz Company
JELL-O/The Kraft Heinz Company

JELL-O has good news for anyone who has ever gotten hungry watching slime videos on YouTube. As MovieWeb reports, the snack brand has added two new products to their JELL-O Play line: Monster Slime and Unicorn Slime, both of which are 100 percent edible.

JELL-O edible slime starts as a powdered mix. At home, kids and parents can stir three scoops of the powder together with one scoop of warm water for 30 seconds then add an additional tablespoon of warm water to make the slime.

Like the slime you find in toy stores or the DIY kind, this slime is meant to be played with. "The slime stretches if you pull it slowly, but snaps if you pull it apart fast," the product description reads. "It's firm if you squeeze it, but it can also pour and drip like a liquid!" And after they're done playing with their slime, kids (and fun-loving adults) can eat it. As for the slime that does't get eaten and ends up on clothes and hands, JELL-O says it washes off easily with soap and water.

The JELL-O slime comes in two flavors, lime for Monster Slime and strawberry for Unicorn Slime, and will be available in select stores beginning in December. It's part of a line of interactive snack products from JELL-O, which includes pudding pop molds and dirt cups kits.

[h/t MovieWeb]

A Home Alone-Themed Clothing Line Has Arrived Just in Time for Holiday Party Season

RSVLTS
RSVLTS

Little Nero’s Pizza isn’t fiddlin’ around, and neither are The Roosevelts. Just in time for holiday party season, the apparel company—more popularly known as RSVLTS—has launched a clothing line based on Home Alone, the John Hughes-penned 1990 family classic starring Macaulay Culkin.

The logo for Little Nero’s, the fictional pizza chain that Kevin ordered from in the film, has been printed on a red ball cap and a long-sleeved T-shirt. The latter has logos on both the front and back, with the tagline—"No Fiddlin’ Around!"—printed on the sleeve. You can even order a replica of the jacket worn by the pizza delivery kid who was verbally assaulted by a recording of a shoot-'em-up gangster movie.

A long-sleeve shirt with "No Fiddlin' Around" written on the sleeve
RSVLTS

A jacket with "Little Nero's Pizza" written on the back
RSVLTS

A couple of button-up Oxfords are also available. One features everyone's favorite inept burglars, Harry and Marv, in various stages of distress, like being lit on fire or smacked in the face with a red-hot iron (against a sky blue backdrop, no less). Another design features tiny Home Alone-themed icons: an airplane, a pizza, the Eiffel Tower, a bucket of paint, and more of the Wet Bandits, of course.

A button-down shirt with Home Alone-themed icons on it
RSVLTS

Lastly, there’s a “battle plan” hoodie featuring Kevin’s hand-drawn blueprint for outsmarting the burglars. All of the items are officially licensed by 21st Century Fox and range in price from $30 to $75.

If you want to peruse more pop culture-themed apparel, check out RSVLTS's Bob Ross, Rocky, and The Sandlot collections.

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