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There’s an Easier Way to Clean Your Microwave

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No appliance breeds more workplace resentment than the office microwave. One employee's minestrone spatter is another person's reason to post passive-aggressive notes about courtesy, professionalism, and the mythical kitchen fairy. But peace is attainable, even without scrubbing. All it takes is a bowl, tap water, and one lemon, and the beleaguered microwave will do the rest.

You’ll essentially be steam-cleaning the gunk off the microwave walls. The added acid from the lemon juice acts as a detergent, breaking down the crust of last week’s curry explosion.

Photo of two lemons, one sliced in half.
André Karwath, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.5

The Kitchn explains how to do it.

Step one: Gather a microwave-safe bowl, one lemon, and a dishcloth or a wad of paper towels.

Step two: Pour about a half-cup of water into the bowl.

Step three: Slice the lemon in half. Squeeze both halves into the water, then add them to the bowl.

Step four: Microwave the whole setup on high for three minutes, until the water boils, then let it stand, with the door closed, for another five.

Step five: Remove the bowl carefully. Use your towel to easily wipe the microwave's inner surfaces clean.

Step six: Write another passive-aggressive note. (Who are we trying to kid? Lemons can't resolve this drama.)

[h/t The Kitchn]

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How to Spot the Convincing New Phishing Scam Targeting Netflix Users
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Netflix may send customers the occasional email, but these messages will never ask you to provide them with personal or payment info. You'll want to keep this in mind if you encounter a new phishing scam that The Daily Dot reports is targeting the video streaming service's subscribers in Australia and the UK.

MailGuard, an Australian email security company, was the first to take notice of the fraudulent emails. While similar scams have targeted Netflix users in the past, this current iteration appears to be more convincing than most. At first (and perhaps even second) glance, the messages appear to be legitimate messages from Netflix, with an authentic-looking sender email and the company’s signature red-and-white branding. The fake emails don’t contain telltale signs of a phishing attempt like misspelled words, irregular spacing, or urgent phrasing.

The subject line of the email informs recipients that their credit card info has been declined, and the body requests that customers click on a link to update their card's expiration date and CVV. Clicking leads to a portal where, in addition to the aforementioned details, individuals are prompted to provide their email address and full credit card number. After submitting this valuable info, they’re redirected to Netflix’s homepage.

So far, it’s unclear whether this phishing scheme has widely affected Netflix customers in the U.S., but thousands of people in both Australia and the U.K. have reportedly fallen prey to the effort.

To stay safe from phishing scams—Netflix-related or otherwise—remember to never, ever click on an email link unless you’re 100 percent sure it’s valid. And if you do end up getting duped, use this checklist as a guide to safeguard your compromised data.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

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7 Science-Backed Ways to Improve Your Memory
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Being cursed with a bad memory can yield snafus big and small, from forgetting your gym locker combination to routinely blowing deadlines. If your New Year's resolution was to be less forgetful in 2018, it's time to start training your brain. The infographic below, created by financial website Quid Corner and spotted by Lifehacker Australia, lists seven easy ways to boost memory retention.

Different techniques can be applied to different scenarios, whether you're preparing for a speech or simply trying to recall someone's phone number. For example, if you're trying to learn a language, try writing down words and phrases, as this activates your brain into paying more attention. "Chunking," or separating long digit strings into shorter units, is a helpful hack for memorizing number sequences. And those with a poetic bent can translate information into rhymes, as this helps our brains break down and retain sound structures.

Learn more tips by checking out the infographic below.

[h/t Lifehacker.com.au]

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